Online Courses


Undergraduate & Graduate Online Courses Summer 2017

Registration for Summer 2017 opens soon.

The following Online courses are available for the Summer 2017 semester.

Syllabi for courses will be uploaded as they are submitted and approved.

Syllabi Information

Syllabi will be added as they are approved.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the term. Prior to that day, all questions should be directed to the Online Learning Office at 860.632.3070. Note: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Comprehensive Examinations for Summer 2017:

Graduate students wishing to complete their program of study by taking the comprehensive exam during the summer semester must sign up for it by registering for the ‘Summer 2017 Comprehensive Examination Resource’ and paying the $275 exam/graduation fee during the spring course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

Tuition & Financial Aid:

For information regarding tuition, fees, refund policy and financial aid, please visit Tuition & Financial Aid

APO 512 Apologetics (Prof. Patrick MadridThis course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.

CHH 300 Church History (Prof. Heather Voccola) This course examines the history of the Catholic Church as a point of evangelization. Topics to be examined will include development of the early Church, the Age of the Fathers, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Reformation period, and the Modern Era.

ENG 131 Poetry (Dr. Hilary Finley)  This course introduces students to classics in poetry and focuses on close-reading and interpretative skills of representative authors. Particular attention is given to the lyric tradition with Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, C. Rossetti, Dickinson, and Hopkins.

ENG 151 Drama (Dr. Hilary Finley) This course surveys Western dramatists from Ancient Greece to the modern day. Dramas will be studied such as, but not exclusive to, the following: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Lorca and St. John Paul II.

ENG 221 Novels, Short Stories, and Literary Research (Cynthia GniadekThis course examines classic and contemporary novels and short stories. Each student will write a paper with guidance through the research and drafting processes.

GRK 203 Greek III (Prof. John Hornyak) This course is third in a series of courses on Koine Greek, and continues the exploration of the language with selections from the New Testament, Septuagint, and Early Christian Writers. Short, project-based assessments help each student build a personalized Linguistic Toolkit.

HIS 101 Western Civilization I (Dr. John BequetteThis course studies the peoples of the Old Testament, the rise and fall of Greek and Roman civilizations, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, the developments in the middle ages, the crusades, the Black Death, the Protestant reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation.

HIS 200 American History (Fr. Gregoire Fluet) The course surveys Pre-Columbus America and ends with the Civil War. Students examine the process of colonization, the Revolutionary War, the growth of the American Republic, and the issues that led to Southern secession.

HIS 351 Eastern Civilization II (Fr. Peter Kucer) This course covers the foundational thought and beliefs of Eastern Civilization stemming from its ancient history.  These essential concepts and beliefs will be studied from a Catholic perspective with special reference to magisterial documents and papal writings.

HUM 104 Humanities in the Early Christian & Medieval World (Dr. John Bequette) This course covers the emergence and spread of Christianity as primary cultural phenomena from the time of Christ until the late middle ages, and introduces the major branches of the humanities–for example, the literature, philosophy, arts and architecture.

LAT 301 Latin III (Dr. Philippe Yates) This course transitions from learning the grammar and basic vocabulary to translating significant texts of ecclesiastical Latin. This course builds on LAT 101 and LAT 102.

MTH 300 Moral Theology (Prof. Jacob Torbeck) This course introduces the foundational concepts of Catholic moral theology, and seeks to provide a mastery of the questions: What is moral theology? What are its underlying precepts? How can we use these to help ourselves and others lead a moral life?

MTH 380 [Marriage and] Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson) This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage.

PAS 161 Catechism Pillars I & II (Prof. Steve Schultz) This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PAS 162 Catechism Pillars III & IV (Prof. Steve Schultz) This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study parts three and four of the Catechism, “Life in Christ” and “Christian Prayer,” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PHE 450 Ethics (Prof. Christopher Apodaca) This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics.

PHH 304 History of Medieval Philosophy (Dr. Jonathan Kirwan) This course will introduce students to medieval philosophy and, in addition to focusing on major thinkers such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham, examine its importance today in such topics as the nature and existence of God, the relationship between faith and reason, and the human soul and its faculties.

PHS 450 Philosophical Anthropology (Prof. Christopher Apodaca) This course will study human nature from two perspectives: 1. We will begin with an examination of the humanity in light of the twentieth century Catholic philosophical tradition, one which begins its examination of the human person in light of lived experience. 2. We will then proceed to understand human nature as developed in the Medieval Catholic tradition, especially as it is presented through the work of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor. You will be expected to apply what you have learned to modern challenges to the dignity of the human person.

PHS 490 Metaphysics (Dr. Jonathan Kirwan) Metaphysics is that most general investigation of philosophy that attempts to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian and Thomistic metaphysics. Topics included are the nature of metaphysics as a science and its subject matter; the distinction between being and essence; and the analogy of being.

SAS 451 Synoptic Gospels (Fr. Randy Soto)  This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

SAS 471 Letters of St. Paul (Fr. William Mills) This course studies the major themes of the Pauline corpus with consideration of the form of writing known as the epistles. Concentration is on I Thessalonians, I Corinthians, Galatians, and Romans.

SCM 101 Mathematics Among the Liberal Arts (Dr. Heric Flores By using game theory and its relation with other mathematical topics including probability, statistics, algebra, and geometry, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation.

SCM 301 Anatomy and Physiology I (Prof. Adam Riso) 

Master of Arts in Theology

New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians. You may take any core course at the same time.

*** Please note that all Pastoral Studies courses qualify as electives for the Master of Arts in Theology program. ***

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • DTH 600 Introduction to Theology (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course explains why modern European ideas both within and outside the Catholic Church have led to the conclusion that faith is contrary to reason; examines the relationship of theology, the science of faith, to reason, emphasizing why theology is the queen of the sciences identifying its nature and method; and shows the nature of the act of faith itself and how it relates to other kinds of human knowledge.
  • PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.

Core Courses Offered

  • DTH 731: One and Triune God (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course studies God, One and Three. It considers the divine nature and the trinity of persons in God, attending particularly to the theology of St. Augustine, of St. Thomas Aquinas, and of the contemporary Church.
  • DTH 751 Christology (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas.
  • MTH 611: Fundamental Moral Theology I (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. . Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience.
  • SAS 651 Synoptic Gospels (Fr. Randy Soto) This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

Courses Offered by Concentration

Apologetics

  • APO 512 Apologetics (Prof. Patrick MadridThis course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.
  • APO 620 Evolution and Catholic Thought (Elective) (Dr. Donald SparlingThis course explores the theory of evolution and sources of Catholic teaching regarding whether evolution is an ‘acceptable’ concept within the Church. Can also be used for credit in CHH 620.
  • APO 652 New Athiesm (Dr. Sebastian Mahfood, OP and Dr. Donald SparlingThis course focuses on the nature of the New Atheism and the attempt it is making to secure political power in its assault against the faith.

Bioethics

  • BIE 625 Catholic Bioethics (For non-NCBC students) (Prof. Judith Babarsky and Dr. Hermann Frieboes) This interdisciplinary course prepares students for pastoral service through an intensive review of the teachings of the Catholic Church regarding the sanctity and dignity of human life from the moment of conception until natural death. Topics include the most challenging and difficult moral and medical issues in the field of contemporary bioethics. Can also be used for credit in MTH 625.
  • BIE 639 Bioethics and the Law (Elective) (Deacon Thomas Davis) This course introduces basic constitutional, statutory, and regulatory law related to bioethics. United States Supreme Court case law is a central component of the course. The course will examine the development of constitutional substantive due process, privacy, individual autonomy, and equal protection. The structure of American constitutional government, the separation of powers, the protection of individual liberties, and related political and philosophical foundations are examined.
  • BIE 661: Biology and Biotechnologies for Ethicists (Drs. Laura & Hermann Frieboes) This course studies the basic biological principles related to ethical issues such as in vitro fertilization and other reproductive technologies, embryonic and adult stem cells, artificial contraception, and genetic engineering from the standpoint of the Catholic faith.

Church History

  • CHH 671 Documents of Vatican II (Fr. Gregoire Fluet) This course introduces the history of Vatican II and the content of the documents. Topics include the background of the Council, the nature of the Church, inner spiritual renewal, the Church and the world, and the effects of the Council.
  • CHH 700 Church History (Dr. Christopher Bellitto

Dogmatic Theology

  • DTH 641 Protology & Eschatology (Dr. Marianne Siegmund) This course studies God as the Creator of all things and the relation of created things to Him. The four last things (death, judgment, heaven and hell) are related to Him as the fulfillment of man and nature, the end of His saving plan. (Elective)
  • DTH 645 Nature and Grace (Fr. Brian Mullady, O.P.) This course examines the natural desire to see God; the controversy over the desire to see God; the state of human nature; the nature of the law; the new law of Christ – sanctifying grace; and the nature, necessity and effects of sanctifying grace.
  • DTH 760 Ecclesiology and Ecumenism (Dr. Marianne SiegmundThis course investigates the nature and characteristics of the Church, its attributes, its structures, its mission and its relation to the world, and the development of Catholic thought concerning ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue.
  • DTH 765 Mariology (Elective) (Fr. Peter Kucer, M.S.A.) This course examines Marian doctrine in its scriptural, historical, and modern contexts using infallible statements, Lumen gentium, and post-conciliar documents.

Moral Theology

  • MTH 612 Fundamental Moral Theology II (Fr. Brian Mullady, O.P.This course examines the nature of moral habit, virtue, and sin with the purpose of preparing priests and religion teachers, spiritual advisors, or other Christians to engage accurately in moral evaluation and formation.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.
  • MTH 851 Comtemporary Moral Issues (Elective) (Dr. Marianne SiegmundThis course researches and evaluates selected significant moral questions confronting the Church and the world today, including such issues as abortion and euthanasia in their contemporary aspects, pressing issues in social justice, issues in business, environment, and media ethics, and critical issues in sexual ethics.

Sacred Scripture

  • SAS 638 Torah and Old Testament Historical Books (Elective) (Dr. Matthew Ramage
  • SAS 661 Gospel of John (Fr. William MillsThis course studies the Gospel of John considering the historical, religious, and cultural background of this gospel and major themes such as covenant, Kingdom of God, grace, redemption, wisdom, prophecy, creation, Trinity, faith, angels, resurrection and priesthood.
  • SAS 671 Letters of St Paul (Fr. William Mills) This course studies the composition, structure, purpose, historical background and theological themes of the Pauline letters with an exegesis of selected passages.
  • SAS 681 Hebrews (Elective) (Fr. Randy SotoThis course teaches the Theology of the Priesthood in the Letter to the Hebrews. The first two modules illuminate the Sitz im Leben, the third is a meditation via lectio divina, and the fourth relates the Priesthood of Jesus Christ to the Priesthood in the Catholic Church. 

Summative Evaluation

  • ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing (Prof. Cynthia Gniadek and Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Master of Arts in Philosophy


New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHH 605 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. You may take any core course at the same time.

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • PHH 605 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Dr. Timothy Smith) This course covers some of the most important figures and themes of Ancient and Medieval philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, the nature of man, education, the ultimate end of human activity, the meaning of life, God, Providence, and faith and reason.
  • PHH 620 Modern and Contemporary Philosophy (Dr. Randall ColtonThis course is an historical introduction to the thought and texts of principal modern philosophers from Descartes to Hegel and of principal contemporary philosophers from Kierkegaard to the present.

Core Courses Offered

  • PHE 610 Ethics (Dr. Francisco Carrasquillo) This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics.
  • PHS 611 Logic and Epistemology (Dr. Philippe Yates) This course surveys twin foundations upon which all philosophy depends relying on Aristotelian insights as developed by the great Christian philosophers of the Middle Ages, and develops these in the light of contributions from modern and contemporary philosophy.
  • PHS 621 Philosophy of Nature & Metaphysics (Dr. Timothy SmithThis course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods, along with the metaphysics of Aristotle; presuppositions of metaphysics, the subject matter of metaphysics, the scandal of generality, substance and essence, from finite to Infinite Being, the nature of existence, the names of God.

Concentration Courses Offered

Christian Wisdom

  • PHS 741 St. Thomas Aquinas on Being and Nothingness (Dr. Robert Delfino) This course will help students to learn the most important metaphysical doctrines of St. Thomas. It presents an understanding of reality from Being itself (God) to nothingness (complete absence of being). We shall mostly focus on primary texts from Aquinas, but, when appropriate, we shall read selections from other thinkers who have influenced Aquinas, such as Aristotle and St. Augustine.

Ethics

  • PHE 663 Natural Law (Dr. David Arias) This course includes topics such as enlightenment jurisprudence and the “Culture of Death,” the foundations of the natural law, how the natural law works, natural law as a basis for good laws, and natural law in Catholic moral teaching.
  • PHE/MTH 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course introduces Catholic sexual ethics using the work of John Paul II, and examines the significant philosophical thought of Karol Wojtyla on this topic in his Love and Responsibility and Theology of the Body.
  • PHE 775 Political Philosophy (Dr. Jon Kirwan This course seeks to introduce students to political philosophy by undertaking a critical historical study of the most influential works (ancient, medieval, and modern) of the Western tradition. Students will study and analyze the fundamental issues that have shaped the debate throughout the centuries, including the nature of justice, law and liberty, power and authority, political equality, human rights, and the relation of Church and the state. Within this context various forms of governments will be examined, such as democracy, monarchy, and socialistic and communistic states.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.

History of Philosophy

  • PHH 651 Aristotle (Dr. Richard Geraghty)  This course will cover selections from Aristotle’s works of the Categories, the Physics, the De Anima, the Metaphysics, and the Nicomachean Ethics in order to show that reading Aristotle is still the best introduction to philosophy there is. The reason is that Aristotle, inspired by his teacher Plato who in turn was inspired by Socrates, showed that the ability to philosophize is natural to man. In pursuing an understanding of this, we will employ the Pagan Aristotle and the Christian Aquinas as our guides.
  • PHH 681 Arabic Philosophy (Dr. Francisco Romero Carrasquillo) This course examines the historical and systematic development of philosophy as an aid to theology produced in the Arabic-speaking world during the classical period of Arabic scholasticism from alKindi (in the early 9th century) to Ibn Rushd (in the late 12th century).

Systematic Philosophy

  • PHS 641 Reason in the Theology of St. Thomas (Dr. Peter MangoThis course explores and applies as a solution to some of the most acute problems discussed in modern theology Aquinas’s third way, expressed in the Summa Theologica (I, q. 32 a. 1), of using reason in sacred theology, the first two ways being explained in the Summa Contra Gentiles involving Natural Theology and a movement from principles of Faith revealed through Jesus Christ.
  • PHS 657 Phenomenology (Dr. John FinleyThis course introduces phenomenology as a way of doing philosophy, and in particular, as a study of human experience.
  • PHS 671 Aesthetics (Dr. Michela FerriThe discipline of Aesthetics emerged in the modern period consequent upon the separation of the transcendental qualities True, Good, and Beautiful from each other, and the emergence of a notion of “fine art” dedicated to beauty. We will argue that this differentiation is a good thing, provided we can begin to see these three in their complex interrelationship and relate fine art to the broader human capacity of making.

Electives

  • PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP) This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.

Summative Evaluation

  • ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing (Prof. Cynthia Gniadek and Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies

(MAPS courses may be taken as electives within the MA in Theology Degree Program)

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

Core Courses Offered

  • PAS 511 Mission & Evangelization (Dr. Marianne Siegmund)
    This course explores biblical-theological foundations of mission, the forms of evangelization, education for evangelization, specific missionary vocation, challenges in evangelization and an exploration of St. John Paul II’s call for new ardor, expression, and method in evangelization.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.

Concentration Courses Offered

  • PAS 621 Pastoral Care of Marriage and Family (Fr. Gregory Lockwood) This course will explore marriage as a spousal covenant from the biblical and traditional perspectives and consider how to minister to families, using as a basic text, John Paul II’s Magisterial Document, Familiaris consortio. Modern challenges to marriage will also be addressed.
  • PAS 671 Spiritual Direction: Skills and Practice (Fr. Dominic AnaetoThis course equips the participants with the technical skills for spiritual direction, skills which enable the participants go through personal discernment and help others in both personal and communitarian discernment for discovery of personal vocation and decision making.
  • MTH/PAS/ PHE 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson) This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage.
  • PAS 791 Morals and Psychology (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP This course concerns the mutual influence of the life of reason and the emotions on moral practice with emphasis on the nature of emotions, repressive and affirmation neuroses, freedom of the will in neurotics, and the influence of moral practice on the prevention of neuroses.

Summative Evaluation

  • ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing (Prof. Cynthia Gniadek and Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Registration Forms

Printable Course Registration Forms

(To print: click the button, select file on your internet browser, and click print)

Degree Plans

Undergraduate Degree Plans

  • Associate of Arts – Theology with Normative Distribution of Transfer Credits from the Angelicum Academy and Adler-Aquinas Institute*

Pre-Theology Intellectual Formation Equivalency

Graduate Degree Plans

Master of Arts in Theology with a concentration in (choose one of the following):

Master of Arts in Philosophy with a concentration in (choose one of the following):

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies with a concentration in (choose one of the following):


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