Online Courses


Undergraduate & Graduate Online Courses Fall 2017

Registration for Fall 2017 opens Monday, July 17th for Online courses. Fall Courses will be listed on Monday, June 26th for advising purposes. Syllabi will be uploaded as they are submitted and approved.

Syllabi Information

Syllabi will be added as they are approved.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the term. Prior to that day, all questions should be directed to the Online Learning Office at 860.632.3070. Note: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Comprehensive Examinations for Fall 2017:

Graduate students wishing to complete their program of study by taking the comprehensive exam during the Fall semester must sign up for it by registering for the Fall 2017 Comprehensive Examination Resource’ and paying the $275 exam/graduation fee during the spring course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

Tuition & Financial Aid:

For information regarding tuition, fees, refund policy and financial aid, please visit Tuition & Financial Aid

APO 512 Apologetics (Prof. Patrick Madrid) This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.

APO 520 Adapting Evangelization to Hispanic Cultural Contexts (Margaret Posner) This course focuses on Hispanic cultural contexts as integral to effective evangelization models. Traditional evangelization strategies do not acknowledge the cultural differences between the particular pastoral needs of multiple Hispanic populations. Broadening the evangelist’s scope of specific themes, central to Hispanic perspectives, is crucial to effectively personalize the faith message.

CHH 263 The Catholic Response during WWII (Prof. Heather Voccola) This course examines the Catholic response during World War II. Topics include a review of the Papal response, including Pius XI and Pius XII; the martyrdom of St. Maximilian Kolbe and St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross; and exposure to the holocaust in literature and film.

CHH 501 Historical Knowledge & Human Good (Dr. John BequetteThis course explores the relationship between historical knowledge and human flourishing, both temporally and eternally. What key historical events, figures, controversies and concepts should an adult retain after having left college? How ought a mature, Christian adult view history? What role does historical knowledge play in establishing a flourishing social life? Is there a connection between a proper historical consciousness and eternal salvation?

DTH 101 Fundamental Theology (Prof. Randy Watson) This course introduces the sources, topics, and history of theology as a foundation for further study. Attention is given to the origins of doctrine and its form, important to almost all branches of theology.

ENG 131 Poetry (Prof. Cynthia Gniadek) This course introduces students to classics in poetry and focuses on close-reading and interpretative skills of representative authors. Particular attention is given to the lyric tradition with Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, C. Rossetti, Dickinson, and Hopkins.

ENG 181 Research and Writing (Prof. Jason Braun)

ENG 221 Novels, Short Stories, & Literary Research (Prof. Cynthia Gniadek) This course examines classic and contemporary novels and short stories. Each student will write a paper with guidance through the research and drafting processes.

FPA 311 Western Art Humanities: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Music and Dance (Fr. Peter Kucer) Students study western civilization through the medium of important art. The studies are supported by visual graphics. The class emphasizes oral questioning, working in groups, student presentations, and linking what is taught to the student’s background and life experiences.

GRK 201 Greek I (Prof. John Hornyak) This course emphasizes basic grammar and vocabulary drawn from philosophic and biblical Greek texts, and provides a working vocabulary of terms used in both Attic and Koine dialects.

HIS 201 American History (Fr. Gregoire Fluet) The course surveys Pre-Columbus America and ends with the Civil War. Students examine the process of colonization, the Revolutionary War, the growth of the American Republic, and the issues that led to the secession of the south. This course will then continue with the history of the United States of America from the Reconstruction to the election of 2000. The student focuses on the persons who moved that history, seeing them as human being with both flaws and great talents.

HIS 203 Western Civilization I (Dr. John BequetteThis course covers the history of Western civilization from the dawn of civilization through the Council of Trent. The intent of this course is for the student to develop an understanding of both the flow of history as an integrated whole, as well as an understanding of the significant part played by the Catholic Church in building Western civilization.

HUM 103 Humanities in the Ancient World (Fr. Peter Kucer) This course introduces the origin and development of the humanities, with an emphasis in the classical world. These branches of learning concerned with human thought and relations are distinguished from the sciences.

LAT 201 Latin I (Dr. Philippe Yates) This course introduces the student to the basics of Latin, with the aim of enabling the student to approach medieval and modern ecclesiastical Latin texts. It is the first of three courses designed to give the student the skills to read modern ecclesiastical Latin.

LLT 300 Introduction to Liturgy (Fr. Gregoire Fluet) This course explains that all theology is derived from the sacred Liturgy, the heart of Catholic faith and life. It will look at Liturgy as the starting point and the greatest teacher, opening to the mysteries of the Catholic faith.

LLT 453 Liturgical Theology (Fr. Dennis Kolinski) This course demonstrates how the Liturgy is the source and summit of the Christian Life as found in Sacrosanctum concilium, 10. Students examine liturgical theology especially in terms of its theological and spiritual dimensions, while integrating pastoral and canonical applications.

MTH 425 Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)

PAS 161  Catechism I (Prof. Steven Schultz) This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PAS 162 Catechism II (Prof. Steven Schultz) This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study parts three and four of the Catechism, “Life in Christ” and “Christian Prayer,” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PHH 301 History of Ancient Philosophy (Dr. Peter Mango) This course studies the most representative thinkers of ancient philosophy, beginning with Plato, Socrates and Aristotle and ending with St. Augustine and Boethius.

PHS 121 Logic (Dr. Philippe YatesThis undergraduate course introduces the basic structures of sound thinking, analytic reading, and the evaluation of arguments, achieving the latter through practice in Aristotelian logic and examination of the three acts of the mind in Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy.

PHS 414 Epistemology (Dr. Philippe Yates) This course gives an insight into classical answers to Aristotelian, Socratic, and Platonic questions and give students the tools to devise their own responses.

PHS 415 Philosophy of God (Prof. Christopher Apodaca) Natural Theology, the highest of the sciences, is the reasoned, philosophical study of the existence of God and His attributes. In this course, we will begin by exploring various types of atheism and then move on to the study of St. Thomas’ famous Five Ways for proving God’s existence. Next we will learn about the various Divine Attributes which one can discover by reason alone, and finally, students will demonstrate their understanding of the topics covered in this course by developing a presentation on a book relating to theism and the challenges of atheism.

PHS 450 Philosophical Anthropology (Prof. Christopher Apodaca) In this course you will study human nature from the perspective of Catholic phenomenological and existential insights taught by. The second half of the course will be from the perspective of the perennial tradition of Catholic philosophy.

SAI 213 Theology of the Icon (Rita Sawaya & Chady Elias) This course explores the canonical Scriptures and Apocrypha and their influence on Christian iconography. It analyzes various Christian artworks from both the pseudo-canonical and scriptural standpoints, enabling students to understand the Bible as main source of inspiration fundamental to Christian iconography, as well as the Apocrypha and their enduring significance in Christian art both in rhetorical and pictorial forms. We will investigate selected Christian icons and artwork to develop an understanding the theological foundation, interpretation and finality of Christian iconography.

SAI 372/PHS 471 Aesthetics in Sacred Art (Dr. Michaela Ferri) This course explores the various elements of Aesthetics in “Sacred Christian Art”, in comparison with secular Christian Arts of religious themes, and in comparison with Art in general. We learn the specifics of Christian theological, doctrinal, theosophical and philosophical thought foundations as they relate to Aesthetics in Sacred Arts and examine their evolution through the ages. Students will recognize and develop an appreciation for the uniqueness of the Aesthetics used in Christian Arts through their multiple facets, intended relation, and effect on the human senses both cognitively, symbolically and spiritually.

SAI 427 Hagiography from Sacred Art to Liturgy (Rita Sawaya & Chady Elias) This course explores the life of saints through their representation in figurative sacred artwork. It explains the relation between iconographic hagiography in its liturgical and scriptural contexts. Its main purpose is to enable the students to understand, appreciate, study and interpret hagiographic iconography and its meaning and uses in sacred space and time within liturgy.

SAS 101 Sacred Scripture (Fr. Randy Soto) This course treats in detail the Biblical inspiration, canonicity, texts, versions, hermeneutics, literary genre, and the ongoing sanctifying activity of the Holy Spirit through the use of the Holy Scripture both by individuals and by the Church officially.

SAS 471 Letters of St. Paul (Fr. William Mills) This course studies the major themes of the Pauline corpus with consideration of the form of writing known as the epistles. Concentration is on I Thessalonians, I Corinthians, Galatians, and Romans.

SCM 171 Biology (Dr. Don Sparling) This course is an introduction to the biological sciences directed toward non-science majors. Topics include elements of biochemistry, cell structure and function, reproduction, genetics, evolutionary theory, plant and animal diversity, elements of physiology, and a brief examination of ecology.

SCM 200 Mathematics among the Liberal Arts (Dr. Heric Flores) By using game theory and its relation with other mathematical topics including probability, statistics, algebra, and geometry, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation.

SCM 301 Anatomy and Physiology I (Adam Riso) This course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture topics include an introduction of anatomical terminology and an overview of cellular processes and tissue classification. Students then learn the gross and microscopic anatomy of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, and muscular system. Section 2 of this course includes discussion of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

SCM 302 Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (Adam Riso) This course will introduce students to the concepts, principles and fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology. In this course, you will familiarize yourself with scientific thinking and techniques and will enable you to explore of some key principles of human anatomy. You will be asked to assess your knowledge, which eventually can be put to practical or experimental use. Experiments in this course will involve studying the different body tissues, the skeletal system, and the muscular system.

SOC 253 Political Science (Prof. J. Joseph Jordan) The course surveys ideas in the study of government and politics, examines the perennial questions in political life (Who should rule? and Is it good to have power? and Do truth and right change in the course of history?), and explores the various fields of political science.

SOC 325 Catholic Formation & New Media (Prof. Cynthia GniadekThis course examines Catholic spiritual formation in light of new forms of media, including social media and online communication. Approaches to Catholic spiritual direction and spiritual formation are introduced, and the promise and problem of online approaches to formation are examined. 

Master of Arts in Theology

New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians. You may take any core course at the same time.

*** Please note that all Pastoral Studies courses qualify as electives for the Master of Arts in Theology program. ***

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • DTH 600 Introduction to Theology (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course explains why modern European ideas both within and outside the Catholic Church have led to the conclusion that faith is contrary to reason; examines the relationship of theology, the science of faith, to reason, emphasizing why theology is the queen of the sciences identifying its nature and method; and shows the nature of the act of faith itself and how it relates to other kinds of human knowledge.
  • PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.

Core Courses Offered

  • DTH 731: One and Triune God (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course studies God, One and Three. It considers the divine nature and the trinity of persons in God, attending particularly to the theology of St. Augustine, of St. Thomas Aquinas, and of the contemporary Church.
  • DTH 751 Christology (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas.
  • MTH 611: Fundamental Moral Theology I (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. . Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience.
  • SAS 651 Synoptic Gospels (Dr. Matthew Ramage) This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

Courses Offered by Concentration

  • APO 512 Apologetics (Prof. Patrick MadridThis course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.
  • APO 520 Adapting Evangelization to Hispanic Cultural Contexts (Margaret Posner) This course focuses on Hispanic cultural contexts as integral to effective evangelization models. Traditional evangelization strategies do not acknowledge the cultural differences between the particular pastoral needs of multiple Hispanic populations. Broadening the evangelist’s scope of specific themes, central to Hispanic perspectives, is crucial to effectively personalize the faith message.
  • APO 565 Reading Science in the Light of Faith (Non-Seminarians) (Dr. Stacy TrasancosThis course teaches the non-scientist layperson how to articulate developments in current research in biological or biochemical fields (with particular emphasis on evolutionary biology, genetics, or neuroscience) by reading scientific papers and how to classify the conclusions in the scientific papers as neutral, contradictory, or consistent with the tenets of Catholic faith.
  • APO 565 Reading Science in the Light of Faith (Seminarians) (Dr. Stacy TrasancosThis course teaches the non-scientist layperson how to articulate developments in current research in biological or biochemical fields (with particular emphasis on evolutionary biology, genetics, or neuroscience) by reading scientific papers and how to classify the conclusions in the scientific papers as neutral, contradictory, or consistent with the tenets of Catholic faith.
  • BIE 796 Bioethics in the Post-Christian Culture (Dr. Hermann FrieboesThis course covers the development of bioethics in the post-Christian culture.  Fundamental philosophical and theological notions underlying the concept of bioethics from a Catholic perspective include human life, freedom, love, truth, reason, and human fulfillment.  These notions have long-standing meaning rooted in the teaching of Christ as proclaimed by His apostles and have formed the basis for the development of the Christian culture in the western world for almost two millennia. Fruits of this culture have included concepts such as respect for human life, human rights, and the human family, all of which form the basis for Catholic bioethics.
  • CHH 501 Historical Knowledge & Human Good (Dr. John BequetteThis course explores the relationship between historical knowledge and human flourishing, both temporally and eternally. What key historical events, figures, controversies and concepts should an adult retain after having left college? How ought a mature, Christian adult view history? What role does historical knowledge play in establishing a flourishing social life? Is there a connection between a proper historical consciousness and eternal salvation?
  • CHH 631 Mystical Theology and the Church Fathers (Dr. Alphonso Pinto) This course focuses on selected writings of representative Eastern and Western Church Fathers to gain a better understanding of and appreciation for their teachings on contemplative prayer and the journey of the soul to Divine Union.
  • CHH 661 Catholic Modernism (Fr. Gregoire Fluet)  This course reviews Catholic modernism and addresses the intellectual causes of modernism and its major components. The study includes magisterial statements of Pius X concerning modernism and exposure to the works of several important Catholic modernists.
  • CHH 670 Great Personalities in Church History (Fr. Gregory Lockwood)
  • CHH 700 Church History (Dr. Christopher BellittoThis course surveys Church history, studying the major forces, events and persons shaping the growth and development of Christianity in the East and West.
  • CHH 881 Patristics (Fr. Brian Mullady. O.P.) This course surveys selected writings from the principal Fathers of the Church. The focus is on the development of Catholic Doctrine from the Apostolic Fathers to St. Gregory the Great, with emphasis on the Trinitarian and Christological questions.
  • DTH 760 Ecclesiology and Ecumenism (Dr. Marianne SiegmundThis course investigates the nature and characteristics of the Church, its attributes, its structures, its mission and its relation to the world, and the development of Catholic thought concerning ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue.
  • DTH 765 Mariology (Elective) (Fr. Gregory Lockwood) This course examines Marian doctrine in its scriptural, historical, and modern contexts using infallible statements, Lumen gentium, and post-conciliar documents.
  • DTH 800 The Seven Sacraments (Fr. Gregoire FluetThis course explores the concept and nature of “sacrament” in general and then each of the seven sacraments of the Church in particular (the fundamentals of each sacrament’s doctrine and theology, the rites for celebrating the sacraments, the historical development of each sacrament and current issues and debates surrounding the sacraments).
  • DTH 930 Soteriology (Fr. Randy Soto
  • DTH 950 Protology and Eschatology (Dr. Mariane SiegmundThis course studies God as the Creator of all things and the relation of created things to Him. The four last things (death, judgment, heaven and hell) are related to Him as the fulfillment of man and nature, the end of His saving plan.
  • MTH//PAS 620 Marriage and Family in Secular Culture (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
  • MTH 659 Moral Magisterium of John Paul II (Fr. Brian Mullady, O.P.This course is devoted to the teachings of the Blessed Pope John Paul II in the area of moral theology. Specific topics addressed in this course include the sacred sources of Christian moral teaching, a correct understanding of human freedom, conscience and its application, Veritatis splendor; Evangelium vitae, and the theology of the body.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.
  • SAS 602 Methods of Theology & Scripture Analysis (Fr. Randy Soto) The course examines concepts and criteria used in Biblical and Theological Sciences: word, Revelation, transmission, Truth in Scripture, Canonicity, Authenticity, Integrity, Magisterium, Tradition, etc., and acquaints the students with the Books of the Bible per se: languages; traditions.
  • SAS 621 Prophetic Literature (Dr. Matthew Ramage) This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in Israel, and surveys early “non-writing” prophets, and classical prophets in their historical contexts to uncover their theological message and understand the development of prophecy into eschatology and apocalypse.
  • SAS 661 Gospel of John (Fr. William MillsThis course studies the Gospel of John considering the historical, religious, and cultural background of this gospel and major themes such as covenant, Kingdom of God, grace, redemption, wisdom, prophecy, creation, Trinity, faith, angels, resurrection and priesthood.

Summative Evaluation

Master of Arts in Philosophy


New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHH 605 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. You may take any core course at the same time.

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • PHH 605 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (Dr. Timothy Smith) This course covers some of the most important figures and themes of Ancient and Medieval philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, the nature of man, education, the ultimate end of human activity, the meaning of life, God, Providence, and faith and reason.
  • PHH 620 Modern and Contemporary Philosophy (Dr. Randall ColtonThis course is an historical introduction to the thought and texts of principal modern philosophers from Descartes to Hegel and of principal contemporary philosophers from Kierkegaard to the present.

Core Courses Offered

  • PHS 621 Philosophy of Nature & Metaphysics (Dr. Timothy SmithThis course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods, along with the metaphysics of Aristotle; presuppositions of metaphysics, the subject matter of metaphysics, the scandal of generality, substance and essence, from finite to Infinite Being, the nature of existence, the names of God.

Concentration Courses Offered

  • PHE 615 Nicomachean Ethics (Dr. Richard GeraghtyThe course will consist of large selected portions of The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle The intent is to show the pagan material which aided St. Thomas Aquinas in his formulation of his Christian Moral Theology and Moral Philosophy.
  • PHE 617 Personalism of John Paul II (Fr. Pawel TarasiewiczThe course teaches about the philosophical personalism of St. John Paul II/Karol Wojtyła. It seeks to present St. John Paul II/Karol Wojtyła as an original thinker who can be satisfactorily classified neither as fully Thomist nor fully phenomenologist. The series of lectures starts with the introduction of John Paul II’s personalist formation (Polish Romanticism, Jan Tyranowski, St. John of the Cross, St. Thomas Aquinas, Lublin Philosophical School, Immanuel Kant, Max Scheler, Stefan Cardynal Wyszynski), and then continues by focusing on such topics as the human person’s essence, dignity, subjectivity, consciousness & efficacy, self- determination, fullfilment, body & emotions, love & responsibility, participation and education.
  • PHE/MTH 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course introduces Catholic sexual ethics using the work of John Paul II, and examines the significant philosophical thought of Karol Wojtyla on this topic in his Love and Responsibility and Theology of the Body.
  • PHE 775 Political Philosophy (Dr. Jon Kirwan This course seeks to introduce students to political philosophy by undertaking a critical historical study of the most influential works (ancient, medieval, and modern) of the Western tradition. Students will study and analyze the fundamental issues that have shaped the debate throughout the centuries, including the nature of justice, law and liberty, power and authority, political equality, human rights, and the relation of Church and the state. Within this context various forms of governments will be examined, such as democracy, monarchy, and socialistic and communistic states.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.
  • PHE 960 Politics: Scholasticism and the Enlightenment (Dr. John Hittinger) 
  • PHH 650 Recent Catholic Philosophy (Dr. Alan Vincelette) This course introduces important Catholic philosophers of the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries who responded to the cultural, scientific, philosophical, and theological ideas of the times, and defended the philosophical underpinnings of the Catholic faith.
  • PHH 651 Aristotle (Dr. Richard Geraghty)  This course will cover selections from Aristotle’s works of the Categories, the Physics, the De Anima, the Metaphysics, and the Nicomachean Ethics in order to show that reading Aristotle is still the best introduction to philosophy there is. The reason is that Aristotle, inspired by his teacher Plato who in turn was inspired by Socrates, showed that the ability to philosophize is natural to man. In pursuing an understanding of this, we will employ the Pagan Aristotle and the Christian Aquinas as our guides.
  • PHH 781 Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas (Dr. Jon KirwanThis course covers Aquinas on medieval education, the rise of universities, faith and reason, Aristotelian thought, Aquinas on the world and man, man as a moral agent, the meaning of life, the ultimate end of human action, difference between knowledge and faith; God.
  • PHS 657 Phenomenology (Dr. John FinleyThis course introduces phenomenology as a way of doing philosophy, and in particular, as a study of human experience.
  • PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians (Fr. Brian Mullady, OPThis course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.
  • PHS 731 The One and the Many (Dr. Peter RedpathThis course is a study of the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas concerning the nature of the metaphysical principles of unity and multiplicity and the essential role that these principles play in the existence of things and all other principles of being, becoming, and knowing, including those of experience, art, philosophy, science.
  • PHS 761 The Good, the Bad, the Beautiful, & the Ugly (Dr. Peter RedpathThis course is a study of the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas about good and its opposite, evil, and the beautiful and it opposite, the ugly, in relationship to unity and multiplicity, being and non-being, and truth and error, and different kinds of good and evil, beauty and ugliness, considered in themselves and in relation to their existence within human knowing faculties, appetites, and in relationship to God.
  • PHS 781 Thomistic Personalism: Knowledge and Love (Fr. Pawel TarasiewiczThis course focuses on the creative growth of Thomism known as Thomistic personalism. It provides the general landscape of Thomistic personalism by exploring a selected set of topics, namely cognition, freedom, love, society, dignity, culture and religion. In discussing them, the student is assisted by a broad range of outstanding Thomistic personalists including St. Pope John Paul II (Karol Wojtyla). The course is recommended for those who want to gain a better understanding of human life, of their own and of others, from the perspective of Christian philosophy.

Summative Evaluation

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies

(MAPS courses may be taken as electives within the MA in Theology Degree Program)

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

Core Courses Offered

  • PAS 511 Mission & Evangelization (Dr. Marianne SiegmundThis course explores biblical-theological foundations of mission, the forms of evangelization, education for evangelization, specific missionary vocation, challenges in evangelization and an exploration of St. John Paul II’s call for new ardor, expression, and method in evangelization.
  • MTH/PAS/PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-WilsonThis course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.

Concentration Courses Offered

  • PAS 602 Fundamentals of Practical Theology (Dr. Gregory Popcak
  • PAS 605 Intercultural Competencies (Dr. Sebastian Mahfood) This course explores the nature of intercultural competencies and engage the learner in methods concerning their development and cultivation within a community of faith.
  • PAS 621 Pastoral Care of Marriage and Family (Fr. Gregory Lockwood) This course will explore marriage as a spousal covenant from the biblical and traditional perspectives and consider how to minister to families, using as a basic text, John Paul II’s Magisterial Document, Familiaris consortio. Modern challenges to marriage will also be addressed.
  • PAS 671 Spiritual Direction: Skills and Practice (Fr. Dominic AnaetoThis course equips the participants with the technical skills for spiritual direction, skills which enable the participants go through personal discernment and help others in both personal and communitarian discernment for discovery of personal vocation and decision making.
  • MTH/PAS/ PHE 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson) This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage.
  • PAS 700 Christian Life Together in the Presence of Human, Physical, and Intellectual Impairments (Dr. Marc TumeinskiThis course will draw us into a deeper understanding of Christian faith, vocation, catechesis, ministry & ecclesiology – in light of the presence and reality of physical & intellectual impairment among disciples. As part of the core of Christian life or ministry, our focus is pastoral & ecclesial; rather than clinical, medical, legal or psychological.
  • PAS 891 Methods in Teaching (Dr. Sebastian Mahfood & Dr. Michela Ferri) This course is designed to engage students in the study of teaching methods for face-to-face and online learning environments.

Summative Evaluation

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