On Campus Courses


On Campus Courses

Syllabi Information

Syllabi will be added as they are approved.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the termNote: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Required Texts

You may locate the books you are required to purchase by downloading and opening the syllabus for each of your courses. The course syllabus may be downloaded by clicking on the Title of the course located on this page.

Comprehensive Examinations:

Graduate students wishing to complete their program of study by taking the comprehensive exam during the Spring semester must sign up for it by registering for the Spring 2018 Comprehensive Examination Resource’ and paying the $300 exam/graduation fee during the spring course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

Tuition & Financial Aid:

For information regarding tuition, fees, refund policy and financial aid, please visit Tuition & Financial Aid

DTH 520 – Introduction to the Spirituality of St. John of the Cross, O.C.D.

This course will give students an overview of the spirituality of St John of the Cross with a specific focus on his major work The Ascent of Mt Carmel. Students will be asked to apply St John of the Cross’s teaching to their particular spiritual development and will also develop a presentation to help others understand some aspect of St John of the Cross’s teaching.

ENG 515 – Writing and Composition

This course is designed to support students in the skill of writing with the goal that practice will give them a greater confidence so as to enjoy the art of composition in the English language.

HIS 102 – Western Civilization II

This course continues the study of Western Civilization: the Hundred Years’ War as nations fought to restore a united Christendom, the Enlightenment, the revolutions in France and America, the Napoleonic Age, the two world wars, Vatican II, and into the present day. 

HUM 104 – Humanities in the Early Christian and Medieval World

In this course the emergence and spread of Christianity are viewed as primary cultural phenomena from the time of Christ until the late middle ages. The student is introduced to the major branches of the humanities–for example, the literature, philosophy, arts and architecture as they continue to develop among the civilized peoples of Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa with some emphasis on the culture of Western Europe. An examination of representative ideas and themes, selected texts, and cultural institutions and artifacts provides the data for a cultural overview of the period.

HUM 531 – Great Composers and Their Works

This course will emphasize the personal lives and music of the great composers beginning with the middle to high Baroque of Vivaldi, Handel and Bach and continuing with the music of Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Brahms, etc. 

MTH 580 – Theology of the Body

This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage. 

PAS 162 – Catechism II

This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study parts three and four of the Catechism, “Life in Christ” and “Christian Prayer,” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PHE 450 – Ethics

This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics. 

PHH 401 – History of Modern Philosophy

This course examines the classical modern philosophers beginning with Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, and ending with the 19th century idealist Hegel. 

PHS 414 – Epistemology

This course gives an insight into classical answers to Aristotelian, Socratic, and Platonic questions and give students the tools to devise their own responses. 

PHS 415 – Philosophy of God (Pre-Req: PHS 551 or PHS 530)

Natural Theology, the highest of the sciences, is the reasoned, philosophical study of the existence of God and His attributes. In this course, we will begin by exploring various types of atheism and then move on to the study of St. Thomas’ famous Five Ways for proving God’s existence. Next we will learn about the various Divine Attributes which one can discover by reason alone, and finally, students will demonstrate their understanding of the topics covered in this course by developing a presentation on a book relating to theism and the challenges of atheism.

PSY 200 – Psychology

This course studies foundational questions about psychology. We will ask: what kind of discipline is psychology? What is the content of the study of psychology – mind, will, soul, behavior, character? What is the purpose of the study of psychology? What is the relation of psychology to science, philosophy, and religion? We will examine areas in psychology such as behavioral and cognitive approaches, emotion, development, psychoanalytic and humanistic approaches, and personality. Assessment and cultural diversity will be studied throughout the areas. No prerequisites necessary.

SAS 465 – Johannine Writings

This course covers the Fourth Gospel, the three Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation. Topics include the unique character of John’s Gospel in relation to the Synoptics and theories of authorship. Specifics of Johannine spirituality highlighted by patristic authors is also discussed.

SAS 535 – Women in the Old Testament

This course will study the women of the Old Testament and their unique stories. Utilizing the tools of modern critical scholarship, students will explore the lives of the mothers, daughters, wives, sisters, peasants, prophets, and queens who were called by God to participate in the work of humanity’s redemption.

SCM 105 – Nature of Math

This course is required to all undergraduate students, it will introduce the students to different topics in Mathematics as well as Critical Thinking on how to solve problems.

SCM 303 – Anatomy and Physiology II

This 3 credit course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture topics include discussion of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

CHH 700 – Church History

This course surveys Church history, studying the major forces, events and persons shaping the growth and
development of Christianity in the East and the West.

CHH 881 – Patristics

This course surveys selected writings from the principal Fathers of the Church. The focus is on the development of Catholic Doctrine from the Apostolic Fathers to St. Gregory the Great, with emphasis on the Trinitarian and Christological questions.

CLA 715 – Canon Law II

This course includes a thorough study of the canon law of marriage. 

DTH 520 – Introduction to the Spirituality of St. John of the Cross, O.C.D.

This course will give students an overview of the spirituality of St John of the Cross with a specific focus on his major work The Ascent of Mt Carmel. Students will be asked to apply St John of the Cross’s teaching to their particular spiritual development and will also develop a presentation to help others understand some aspect of St John of the Cross’s teaching.

DTH 751 – Christology (Pre-Req: DTH 731)

This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas. One & Triune God is a pre-requisite to this course. (Pre-Req: DTH 731)

ENG 515 – Writing and Composition

This course is designed to support students in the skill of writing with the goal that practice will give them greater confidence so as to enjoy the art of composition in the English language.

HUM 531 – Great Composers and Their Works

This course will emphasize the personal lives and music of the great composers beginning with the middle to high Baroque of Vivaldi, Handel, and Bach and continuing with the music of Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Brahms, etc. 

MTH 580 – Theology of the Body

This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love, and Marriage. 

PAS 662 – Catechism II

This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study parts three and four of the Catechism, “Life in Christ” and “Christian Prayer,” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PHS 630 – Philosophy of Personalism I

This course will concentrate on the person: Structure, Self-determination, and Relation engaging in the study of various classic philosophical writings and other texts contributing to the rich development of the notion of the human person in today’s theology.

SAS 535 – Women in the Old Testament

This course will study the women of the Old Testament and their unique stories. Utilizing the tools of modern critical scholarship, students will explore the lives of the mothers, daughters, wives, sisters, peasants, prophets, and queens who were called by God to participate in the work of humanity’s redemption.

SAS 802 – Johannine Writings

This course covers the Fourth Gospel, the three Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation. Topics include the unique character of John’s Gospel in relation to the Synoptics and theories of authorship. Specifics of Johannine spirituality highlighted by patristic authors are also discussed.

Registration Forms

Printable Course Registration Forms

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Degree Plans


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