On Campus Courses


Undergraduate & Graduate On Campus Courses

Registration for Fall 2018 opens soon. Syllabi will be uploaded as they are submitted and approved.

Syllabi Information

Syllabi will be added as they are approved.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the termNote: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Required Texts

You may locate the books you are required to purchase by downloading and opening the syllabus for each of your courses. The course syllabus may be downloaded by clicking on the Title of the course located on this page.

Fall Registration Packet

Fall Registration Packet for On Campus Students – Coming Soon

Comprehensive Examinations for Fall 2018:

Graduate students wishing to complete their program of study by taking the comprehensive exam during the Fall semester must sign up for it by registering for the Fall 2018 Comprehensive Examination Resource’ and paying the $300 exam/graduation fee during the spring course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

Tuition & Financial Aid:

For information regarding tuition, fees, refund policy and financial aid, please visit Tuition & Financial Aid

BIE 525 – Foundations in Catholic Bioethics (Dr. Knouse)

This course will provide a study of Catholic Church teaching on beginning and end-of-life bioethics issues and will help students recognize the application of these to their local cultural environment.

CHH 300 – Church History (Fr. Peter Kucer)

This course examines the history of the Catholic Church as a point of evangelization. Topics to be examined will include development of the early Church, the Age of the Fathers, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Reformation period, and the Modern Era.

DTH 535 – Introduction to the Spirituality of St. Teresa of Avila, O.C.D. (Dr. Knouse)

This course will introduce students to Teresian prayer and give guidance based on St. Teresa’s Way of Perfection on how to live a lifestyle that is conducive to growth in prayer.

ENG 115 – Writing and Composition (Dr. Angelyn Arden)

Writing is essential for communication.  It complements speech.  Some find it easier to put thoughts and feelings in writing than the spoken word.  Like speech, writing relies on vocabulary, grammar and semantics (the branch concerned with meaning).  You will be writing in English to communicate with others in many ways: letters, newsletters, reflections, analysis, storytelling, correspondence.  This course is designed to give you the knowledge and skills for such writing.

ENG 131 – Poetry (Dr. Angelyn Arden)

This course introduces students to classics and modern forms in poetry, and focuses on close-reading and interpretative skills of representative authors.

ENG 221 – Novels, Short Stories and Non- Fiction Writing (Dr. Angelyn Arden)

This course examines classic and contemporary novels and short stories. The students write a paper analyzing the literature with guidance through the drafting processes.

HIS 101 – Western Civilization I (Fr. Peter Kucer)

This course studies the peoples of the Old Testament, the rise and fall of Greek and Roman civilizations, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, the developments in the middle ages, the crusades, the Black Death, the Protestant reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation.

HUM 103 – Humanities in the Ancient World (Sr. Mary Linder)

This course introduces the origin and development of the humanities, with an emphasis in the classical world. These branches of learning concerned with human thought and relations are distinguished from the sciences.

HUM 530 – The History of Symphonic Music from Ancient Greece to the 20th Century (Prof. Charles Rex)

This course will trace the development of music based on world events and the effect of those world events on the music produced in the various eras.

PAS 161 – Catechism I (Sr. Mary Linder)

This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PHH 301 – History of Ancient Philosophy (Prof. Chris Apodaca) 

This course studies the most representative thinkers of ancient philosophy, beginning with Plato, Socrates and Aristotle and ending with St. Augustine and Boethius.

PHS 121 – Logic (Prof. Chris Apodaca) 

This course introduces the basic structures of sound thinking, analytic reading, and the evaluation of arguments, the latter through practice in Aristotelian logic and examination of the three acts of the mind in Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy.

PHS 450 – Philosophy of Man (Philosophical Anthropology) (Prof. Chris Apodaca) 

This course will study human nature from two perspectives: 1. We will begin with an examination of the humanity in light of the twentieth century Catholic philosophical tradition, one which begins its examination of the human person in light of lived experience. 2. We will then proceed to understand human nature as developed in the Medieval Catholic tradition, especially as it is presented through the work of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor. You will be expected to apply what you have learned to modern challenges to the dignity of the human person.

PHS 490 – Metaphysics (Dr. Duncan)

Metaphysics is that most general investigation of philosophy that attempts to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian and Thomistic metaphysics. Topics included are the nature of metaphysics as a science and its subject matter; the distinction between being and essence; and the analogy of being.

SAS 512 – Introduction to New Testament (Prof. Marchetti)

This course will introduce students to the study of the New Testament, exploring the ministry of Jesus Christ as the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies and the formation of the early Church in its ancient near eastern context as an outgrowth of Judaism. Students will learn the Catholic theology of revelation, theories of scriptural inspiration, methods of interpretation (exegesis and hermeneutics), the various literary genres represented in the New Testament text, and the process of canonization. The unifying theological themes will be studied with a focus on the timeless relevancy of the message as well as its prophetic vision of the end times.    

SAS 540 – Synoptic Gospels (Fr. Surowiec)

This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

SAS 560 – The Pentateuch (Prof. Parkyn)

This course will critically examine the five books of Moses as the foundation of Holy Scripture. Issues of authorship, date, and historical context will be examined in the light of magisterial pronouncements and current scholarship. Students will thoroughly acquaint themselves with the content of the Pentateuch and trace its influence through the rest of Holy Scripture, the Lectionary, and the Liturgy of the Church.

SAS 570 – Pauline Letters (Prof. Parkyn)

This course studies the life and mission of St. Paul. It will also examine the composition, structure, purpose, historical background and theological themes of the Pauline letters with special concentration on Galatians, ! Corinthians, Philippians, and Romans.

SCM 101 – Mathematics Among the Liberal Arts (Prof. Haddad)

By learning game theory and other mathematical topics including geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and probability, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation.

By learning game theory and other mathematical topics including geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and probability, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation.

SCM 301 – Anatomy and Physiology I (Prof. Adam Riso)

This course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture topics include an introduction of anatomical terminology and an overview of cellular processes and tissue classification. Students then learn the gross and microscopic anatomy of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, and muscular system.

SOC 253 – Political Science (Fr. Peter Kucer)

The course surveys ideas in the study of government and politics, examines the perennial questions in political life (Who should rule? and Is it good to have power? and Do truth and right change in the course of history?), and explores the various fields of political science.

BIE 525 – Foundations in Catholic Bioethics (Dr. Knouse)

This course will provide a study of Catholic Church teaching on beginning and end-of-life bioethics issues and will help students recognize the application of these to their local cultural environment.

CLA 601 – Canon Law I (Rev. Anthony McLaughlin)

The course introduces students to ecclesiastical law through a systematic presentation and study of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, reflecting on the purpose, nature, content, history, background, and consequences of what ecclesiastical law achieves in the life of the Church.

DTH 535 – Introduction to the Spirituality of St. Teresa of Avila, O.C.D. (Dr. Knouse)

This course will introduce students to Teresian prayer and give guidance based on St. Teresa’s Way of Perfection on how to live a lifestyle that is conducive to growth in prayer.

DTH 601 – Revelation, Faith, and Grace (Dr. Gilbert)

This course focuses on God’s call to man (supernatural revelation, the nature of theology as science; Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium), man’s response in faith (the natural desire to see God; the states of human nature; the Old and New Law), and the role of grace (its necessity, character and effects as perfecting human nature).

DTH 655 – Sacraments of Initiation (Sr. Mary Linder)

Building on the knowledge of the Sacraments, students in this course will study the words and rituals of the Sacraments of Initiation for a deeper appreciation of their continuing effects in our lives.

DTH 731 – One and Triune God (Dr. Gilbert)

This course is a doctrinal study of the nature and attributes of God as known by revelation and reason. The God we know and love is One and Three. Topics in this course address both the unity of God and the three-ness of God. The work of St. Thomas Aquinas is used to expose students to these truths to be believed and to form a foundation for further growth and study. This course is a prerequisite to DTH 751 Christology.

DTH 765 – Mariology (Fr. Olczak)

This course examines Marian doctrine in its scriptural, historical, and modern context using the infallible statements, Lumen Gentium and the post-conciliar documents.

DTH 890 – Spiritual Theology (Fr. Mullady)

This course is a systematic study of Christian holiness based on Sacred Scripture and classical writers considering the virtues and gifts of the Holy Spirit, prayer, spiritual direction, and the stages of the life of grace.

MTH 611 – Fundamental Moral I (Fr. Mullady)

This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience.

MTH 612 – Fundamental Moral II (Fr. Mullady)

This course examines the nature of moral habit, virtue, and sin with the purpose of preparing priests and religion teachers, spiritual advisors, or other Christians to engage accurately in moral evaluation and formation.

PHS 631 – The Philosophy and Theology of Personalism Part II (Dr. Duncan)

Studies in the vast literature of this philosophical movement using different readings from Personalism I,and designed to supplement that course, though it can be taken independently. We will explore theologically relevant contributions of Soren Kierkegaard, John Macmurray, St. John-Paul II,and Jacques Maritain.

SAS 512 – Introduction to New Testament (Prof. Marchetti)

This course will introduce students to the study of the New Testament, exploring the ministry of Jesus Christ as the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies and the formation of the early Church in its ancient near eastern context as an outgrowth of Judaism. Students will learn the Catholic theology of revelation, theories of scriptural inspiration, methods of interpretation (exegesis and hermeneutics), the various literary genres represented in the New Testament text, and the process of canonization. The unifying theological themes will be studied with a focus on the timeless relevancy of the message as well as its prophetic vision of the end times.    

SAS 540 – Synoptic Gospels (Fr. Surowiec)

This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

SAS 560 – The Pentateuch (Prof. Parkyn)

This course will critically examine the five books of Moses as the foundation of Holy Scripture. Issues of authorship, date, and historical context will be examined in the light of magisterial pronouncements and current scholarship. Students will thoroughly acquaint themselves with the content of the Pentateuch and trace its influence through the rest of Holy Scripture, the Lectionary, and the Liturgy of the Church.

SAS 570 – Pauline Letters (Prof. Parkyn)

This course studies the life and mission of St. Paul. It will also examine the composition, structure, purpose, historical background and theological themes of the Pauline letters with special concentration on Galatians, 1 Corinthians, Philippians, and Romans.

Registration Forms

Printable Course Registration Forms

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