Undergraduate Courses


Undergraduate Courses

Summer 2016 Online Learning Semester

Classes begin Monday, May 2, 2016!

The following courses are scheduled to be offered through the Online Learning program, undergraduate level, for the Summer 2016 semester. Undergraduates should contact Mrs. Deborah Haggett, Undergraduate Advisor, for advising and registration at 860-632-3056 or dhaggett@holyapostles.edu.

  • Required Materials List (see posted syllabi below for the books required in each course)
  • Summer 2016 Undergraduate Registration Form (To print: Click link for form, select file on your internet browser, and click print)

Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the term. Prior to that day, all questions should be directed to the Online  Learning Office at 860.632.3056.

Note: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Course descriptions for the Summer 2016 semester undergraduate course offerings are listed below. Syllabi are linked.

Core Courses

  • APO 512 Apologetics (Prof. Patrick Madrid)
    This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.
  • ENG 131 Poetry (Dr. Angelyn Arden)
    This course introduces students to classics in poetry, and focuses on close-reading and interpretative skills of representative authors. Particular attention is given to the lyric tradition with Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, C. Rossetti, Dickinson and Hopkins.
  • ENG 221 Novels, Short Stories, & Literary Research (Prof. Margaret Posner and Prof. Cynthia Buttjer)
    This course examines classic and contemporary novels and short stories. The students write a paper on the literature with guidance through the research and drafting processes.
  • HIS 101 Western Civilization I (Dr. John Bequette)
    This course studies the peoples of the Old Testament: the rise and fall of Greek and Roman civilizations, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, the medieval period, the crusades, the Black Death, the Protestant reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation.
  • MTH 300 Moral Theology (Prof. Jacob Torbeck)
    This course introduces the foundational concepts of Catholic moral theology, and seeks to provide a mastery of the questions: What is moral theology? What are its underlying precepts? How can we use these to help ourselves and others lead a moral life?
  • PAS 161 Catechism Pillars I & II Section 3 (Prof. Steven Schultz)
    This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.
  • PHH 304 History of Medieval Philosophy (Dr. Jon Kirwan)
    This course will introduce students to medieval philosophy and, in addition to focusing on major thinkers such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham, examine its importance today in such topics as the nature and existence of God, the relationship between faith and reason, and the human soul and its faculties.

Non-Core Courses

  • CHH 300 Church History (Prof. Heather Voccola)
    This course examines the history of the Catholic Church as a point of evangelization. Topics to be examined will include development of the early Church, the Age of the Fathers, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Reformation period, and the Modern Era.
  • EDT 410 Instructional Design for Mobile Devices (Dr. Mary Beckmann)
    This course explores mobile technologies for teaching and learning and how to implement principles and processes to plan, create, and use various instructional resources and environments for delivery on mobile devices.
  • GRK 201 Greek I (Prof. John Hornyak)
    This course emphasizes basic grammar and vocabulary drawn from philosophic and biblical Greek texts, and provides a working vocabulary of terms used in both Attic and Koine dialects.
  • HIS 201 American History I (Fr. Gregoire Fluet)
    The course surveys Pre-Columbus America and ends with the Civil War. Students examine the process of colonization, the Revolutionary War, the growth of the American Republic, and the issues that led to Southern secession.
  • HIS 352 Eastern Civilization II (Fr. Peter Kucer, MSA)
    This course will complement Eastern Civilization I by chronologically tracing the history of East and South East Asia from ancient times to modern times. In so doing, students will be introduced to cultures, philosophies and religions of East Asia. Special attention will be given to the role of Catholicism throughout East Asian history.
  • HUM 104 Humanities in the Early Christian and Medieval World (Dr. John Bequette)
    This course covers the emergence and spread of Christianity as primary cultural phenomena from the time of Christ until the late middle ages, and introduces the major branches of the humanities–for example, the literature, philosophy, arts and architecture.
  • LAT 202 Latin II (Dr. Philippe Yates)
    This course builds on Latin I and familiarizes the student with the majority of Latin grammar and a significant amount of theological and philosophical Latin vocabulary. It is the second of three courses designed to give the student the skills to read modern ecclesiastical Latin.
  • PHE 215 Ethics of Educational Technology (Prof. David Harrison)
    This course explores various ethical issues in educational technology: copyright, fair use, Creative Commons, accessibility, professional behavior, intellectual property, etc.
  • PHE 501 Ethics (Dr. Ronda Chervin and Prof. Margaret Posner)
    This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics.
  • PHH 404 History of Contemporary Philosophy (Dr. Alan Vincelette)
    This course examines the views of various 20th and 21st century philosophers on issues in ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, and other areas of thought.
  • PHS 541 Natural Theology (Dr. Randy Colton)
    This course examines arguments for the existence of God, His nature and relation to the world and man.
  • SAI 502 Greek Iconography Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Salzman)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Greek icons through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will write a complete Icon to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 503 Russian Iconography Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Forbes)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Russian icons through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will write a complete Icon to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 504 Mosaics Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Vonn Hartung)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Mosaics through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete mosaic artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 505 Stained Glass Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Staff)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of stained glass through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete stained glass artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 506 Calligraphy Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Weilmuenster)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of calligraphy through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete calligraphy artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 507 Illumination Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Crittenden)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of illuminations through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete illumination artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 508 Mural Painting Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Chady Elias)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of small portable mural paintings through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete small portable mural artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop.
  • SAI 509 Sculpture, Clay Modeling & Casting Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Chady Elias)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Sculpture through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete Clay figure and cast the artwork with plaster to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAI 510 Sacred Music Workshop (Onsite in Mystic, CT) (Prof. Youssef)
    This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and use of the sacred music in our daily life through practice, theory and theological discussion. No musical skills needed to attend this workshop.
  • SAS 451 Synoptic Gospels (Fr. Randy Soto)
    This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.
  • SAS 471 Letters of St. Paul (Fr. William Mills)
    This course studies the major themes of the Pauline corpus with consideration of the form of writing known as the epistles. Concentration is on I Thessalonians, I Corinthians, Galatians, and Romans.
  • SCM 101 Mathematics among the Liberal Arts (Dr. Heric Flores-Rueda)
    By using game theory and its relation with other mathematical topics including probability, statistics, algebra, and geometry, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation.

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