On Campus Courses


Undergraduate & Graduate On Campus Courses

Registration for Fall 2017 opens Monday, August 21 for On Campus courses. Fall Courses & Syllabi will be uploaded as they are submitted and approved.

Syllabi Information

Syllabi will be added as they are approved.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the termNote: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Required Texts

You may locate the books you are required to purchase by downloading and opening the syllabus for each of your courses. The course syllabus may be downloaded by clicking on the Title of the course located on this page.

Comprehensive Examinations for Fall 2017:

Graduate students wishing to complete their program of study by taking the comprehensive exam during the Fall semester must sign up for it by registering for the ‘Fall 2017 Comprehensive Examination Resource’ and paying the $275 exam/graduation fee during the spring course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

Tuition & Financial Aid:

For information regarding tuition, fees, refund policy and financial aid, please visit Tuition & Financial Aid

CHH 300 – Church History
This course examines the history of the Catholic Church as a point of evangelization. Topics to be examined will include development of the early Church, the Age of the Fathers, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Reformation period, and the Modern Era.

 ENG 115 – Writing and Composition (Dr. Dawn Eden Goldstein) 
This course is designed to give students the knowledge and skills necessary to compose college-level academic papers. It will begin with instruction in grammar, paragraph structure, and other foundational skills. Students will then gain experience writing autobiographical essays, theological reflections, and a research paper. Assignments will be tailored to students’ abilities.

ENG 131 – Poetry (Dr. Angelyn Arden)
This course introduces students to classics in poetry and focuses on close-reading and interpretative skills of representative authors. Particular attention is given to the lyric tradition with Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, C. Rossetti, Dickinson, and Hopkins.

ENG 221 – Novels, Short Stories and Literary Research (Dr. Angelyn Arden)
This course examines classic and contemporary novels and short stories. Each student will write a paper with guidance through the research and drafting processes.

LAT 201 – Latin I (Prof. Josef Froula) 
This course introduces the student to the basics of Latin, with the aim of enabling the student to approach medieval and modern ecclesiastical Latin texts. It is the first of three courses designed to give the student the skills to read modern ecclesiastical Latin.

HIS 203 – Western Civilization I
This course studies the peoples of the Old Testament, the rise and fall of Greek and Roman civilizations, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, the developments in the middle ages, the crusades, the Black Death, the Protestant reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation.

HUM 103 – Humanities in the Ancient World (Sister Mary Anne Linder, F.S.E.)
This course introduces the origin and development of the humanities, with an emphasis in the classical world. These branches of learning concerned with human thought and relations are distinguished from the sciences.

HUM 530 – The History of Symphonic Music from Ancient Greece to the 20th Century (Prof. Charles Rex)
This course will trace the development of music based on world events and the effect of those world events on the music produced in the various eras.

MTH 425 – Theology of the Body (Joan Morris Gilbert, S.T.D.)
This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage.

PAS 161 – Catechism I
This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II.

PHE 450 – Ethics (Prof. Christopher Apodaca)
This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics.

PHH 301 – History of Ancient Philosophy (Prof. Christopher Apodaca)
This course studies the most representative thinkers of ancient philosophy, beginning with Plato, Socrates and Aristotle and ending with St. Augustine and Boethius.

PHH 401 – History of Modern Philosophy (Prof. Christopher Apodaca)
This course examines the classical modern philosophers beginning with Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, and ending with the 19th century idealist Hegel.

PHS 121 – Logic (Michel Legault, M.S.A.)
This course introduces the basic structures of sound thinking, analytic reading, and the evaluation of arguments, the latter through practice in Aristotelian logic and examination of the three acts of the mind in Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy.

PHS 507 – Compendium of Scholastic Philosophy I (Michel Legault, M.S.A.)
This course provides a philosophical survey of the Scholastic Philosophy, especially the Aristotelian Thomistic approach to main philosophical questions. Topics include the elements of Aristotelian Logic about the three acts of the human mind (simple apprehension, judgment and reasoning; notions about first principles, demonstration and science), natural psychology (philosophy of nature, matter and form, motion, place and time and the First Unknown Mover), and rational psychology or philosophy of man (life and soul, cognition including sensation, perception and intellection, appetition including sensitive appetites and volition, and, finally, a reflection on the nature of man)

PHS 530 – Metaphysics
Metaphysics is that most general investigation of philosophy that attempts to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian and Thomistic metaphysics. Topics included are the nature of metaphysics as a science and its subject matter; the distinction between being and essence; and the analogy of being.

PHS 540 – Work, Leisure and the Person
A great amount of writing about the relationship between human beings and work and leisure, where work is seen as essential to human flourishing and where leisure is also seen as essential to the full becoming of the person, has emerged in recent times in connection with the new personalism. Some of this thinking and teaching has ancient roots; some has developed specifically in relation to new modern problems like technology and urban poverty. Writings of Pope St. John-Paul II, Hannah Arendt, Simone Weil, E.F. Schumacher, Josef Pieper and a few others will help us toward a philosophical and theological synthesis.

PHS 551 – Philosophy of Man (Philosophical Anthropology) (Michel Legault, M.S.A.)
This course will study human nature from two perspectives: 1. We will begin with an examination of the humanity in light of the twentieth century Catholic philosophical tradition, one which begins its examination of the human person in light of lived experience. 2. We will then proceed to understand human nature as developed in the Medieval Catholic tradition, especially as it is presented through the work of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor. You will be expected to apply what you have learned to modern challenges to the dignity of the human person.

SAS 304 – Introduction to Scripture (Joan Morris Gilbert, STD)
This course treats in detail the Biblical inspiration, canonicity, texts, versions, hermeneutics, literary genre, and the ongoing sanctifying activity of the Holy Spirit through the use of the Holy Scripture both by individuals and by the Church officially.

SAS 465 – Johannine Writings (Fr. Jude Surowiec, OFM Conv.)
This course covers the Fourth Gospel, the three Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation. Topics include the unique character of John’s Gospel in relation to the Synoptics and theories of authorship. Specifics of Johannine spirituality highlighted by patristic authors is also discussed.

SAS 520 – Prayer in the New Testament: Psalms and Prophets
This course has been designed to offer students the opportunity to pray the Scriptures in a way that will enhance their lives. Entering into dialogue with the selected texts of Psalms and Prophets, they will be given the opportunity to ask in the words of Pope Emeritus Benedict, “Does it concern me? If so, how?

SCM 200 – Mathematics Among the Liberal Arts
By learning game theory and other mathematical topics including geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and probability, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation.

SCM 303 – Anatomy and Physiology II (Prof. Adam Riso, PA-C)
This course presents a systemic approach to the study of the human body.  Lecture topics include discussion of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.

SOC 253 – Political Science
The course surveys ideas in the study of government and politics, examines the perennial questions in political life (Who should rule? and Is it good to have power? and Do truth and right change in the course of history?), and explores the various fields of political science.

SPA 101 – Spanish I
This course is a basic introduction to Spanish pronunciation, grammar, conversation and reading.

CLA 601 – Canon Law I (Luis Luna M.S.A. Ph.D.)
The course introduces students to ecclesiastical law through a systematic presentation and study of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, reflecting on the purpose, nature, content, history, background, and consequences of what ecclesiastical law achieves in the life of the Church.

DTH 630 – Celibacy and Communion in St. John Paull II’s Catechesis on Human Love (Dr. Dawn Eden Goldstein)
This course will examine the rich theology of celibacy that St. John Paul II articulates in his Catechesis on Human Love (popularly known as the theology of the body) within the context of other relevant writings of his, particularly those which concern communio ecclesiology. It will also locate John Paul’s insights within the Catholic tradition as articulated by St. Augustine, St. Thomas Aquinas, Pius XII, and the Second Vatican Council.

DTH 731 – One and Triune God (Dr. Josef Froula)
This course is a doctrinal study of the nature and attributes of God as known by revelation and reason. The God we know and love is One and Three. Topics in this course address both the unity of God and the three-ness of God. The work of St. Thomas Aquinas is used to expose students to these truths to be believed and to form a foundation for further growth and study. This course is a prerequisite to DTH 751 Christology.

HUM 530 – The History of Symphonic Music from Ancient Greece to the 20th Century
This course will trace the development of music based on world events and the effect of those world events on the music produced in the various eras.

MTH 611 – Fundamental Moral I (Fr. Brian Mullady, O.P.)
This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience.

MTH 612 – Fundamental Moral II (Fr. Brian Mullady, O.P.) 
This course examines the nature of moral habit, virtue, and sin with the purpose of preparing priests and religion teachers, spiritual advisors, or other Christians to engage accurately in moral evaluation and formation.

MTH 991 – Moral Virtues in Confession (Fr. Brian Mullady, O.P.)
The purpose of this course is to locate the moral virtues within the context of confessional practice. Special attention is given to the virtue of justice and the material sins needed to fully help penitents and encourage a thorough examination of conscience.

PAS 668 – Catechetics
This course will consider evangelization, new evangelization and catechesis as “a remarkable moment in the whole process of evangelization” (John Paul II, Catechesi Tradendae) based on the mission of her Founder, “Go, teach . . .” (Matthew 28: 19).

PHS 507 – Compendium of Scholastic Philosophy I
This course provides a philosophical survey of the Scholastic Philosophy, especially the AristotelianThomistic approach to main philosophical questions. Topics include the elements of Aristotelian Logic about the three acts of the human mind (simple apprehension, judgment and reasoning; notions about first principles, demonstration and science), natural psychology (philosophy of nature, matter and form, motion, place and time and the First Unknown Mover), and rational psychology or philosophy of man (life and soul, cognition including sensation, perception and intellection, appetition including sensitive appetites and volition, and, finally, a reflection on the nature of man)

PHS 530 – Metaphysics
Metaphysics is that most general investigation of philosophy that attempts to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian and Thomistic metaphysics. Topics included are the nature of metaphysics as a science and its subject matter; the distinction between being and essence; and the analogy of being.

PHS 540 – Work, Leisure and the Person
A great amount of writing about the relationship between human beings and work and leisure, where work is seen as essential to human flourishing and where leisure is also seen as essential to the full becoming of the person, has emerged in recent times in connection with the new personalism. Some of this thinking and teaching has ancient roots; some has developed specifically in relation to new modern problems like technology and urban poverty. Writings of Pope St. John-Paul II, Hannah Arendt, Simone Weil, E.F. Schumacher, Josef Pieper and a few others will help us toward a philosophical and theological synthesis.

PHS 551 – Philosophy of Man (Philosophical Anthropology)
This course will study human nature from two perspectives: 1. We will begin with an examination of the humanity in light of the twentieth century Catholic philosophical tradition, one which begins its examination of the human person in light of lived experience. 2. We will then proceed to understand human nature as developed in the Medieval Catholic tradition, especially as it is presented through the work of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor. You will be expected to apply what you have learned to modern challenges to the dignity of the human person.

SAS 520 – Prayer in the New Testament: Psalms and Prophets
This course has been designed to offer students the opportunity to pray the Scriptures in a way that will enhance their lives. Entering into dialogue with the selected texts of Psalms and Prophets, they will be given the opportunity to ask in the words of Pope Emeritus Benedict, “Does it concern me? If so, how?

SAS 802 – Johannine Writings (Fr. Jude Surowiec, OFM Conv.)
This course covers the Fourth Gospel, the three Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation. Topics include the unique character of John’s Gospel in relation to the Synoptics and theories of authorship. Specifics of Johannine spirituality highlighted by patristic authors is also discussed.

Please find the Reading List for the Fall 2017 Semester. The list will be updated as new items are added.

Fall 2017 Reading List (Click Here)

Registration Forms

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