Graduate Courses


Graduate Spring 2016 Online Learning Semester

Classes begin on Monday, January 11, 2016.

Comprehensive Examinations for Spring 2016:

Graduate students wishing to complete their program of study by taking the comprehensive exam during the spring semester must sign up for it by registering for the ‘Spring 2016 Comprehensive Examination Resource’ and paying the $275 exam/graduation fee during the spring course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

The following courses are scheduled to be offered through the Online Learning program, graduate level, for the Spring 2016 semester.

Syllabi are being added as they are received.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the term. Prior to that day, all questions should be directed to the Online Learning Office at 860.632.3070.

Note: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Course descriptions for the Spring 2016 semester graduate course offerings are listed below.

Master of Arts in Philosophy


New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHH 605 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. You may take any core course at the same time.

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • PHH 605: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Section 2 (Dr. Timothy Smith)
    This course covers some of the most important figures and themes of Ancient and Medieval philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, the nature of man, education, the ultimate end of human activity, the meaning of life, God, Providence, and faith and reason. [Please note: Dr. Smith hosts Saturday morning synchronous sessions as part of his course design, but students may post a short writing assignment in lieu of attending each week.]
  • PHH 605: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Section 3 (Dr. John Finley)
    This course covers some of the most important figures and themes of Ancient and Medieval philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, the nature of man, education, the ultimate end of human activity, the meaning of life, God, Providence, and faith and reason. [Please note: Dr. Finley’s course is purely asynchronous, which means he does not host live sessions.]

Core Courses Offered

  • PHE 501 Ethics (Dr. Francisco J. Romero Carrasquillo)
    This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics.
  • PHS 551: Philosophical Anthropology (Dr. Ronda Chervin and Prof. Christopher Apodaca)
    This course studies human nature from the perspective of the perennial tradition of Catholic philosophy, as well as that of Catholic phenomenological and existential insights.
  • PHS 611: Logic and Epistemology (Dr. Philippe Yates)
    This course surveys twin foundations upon which all philosophy depends relying on Aristotelian insights as developed by the great Christian philosophers of the Middle Ages, and develops these in the light of contributions from modern and contemporary philosophy.

Concentration Courses Offered

Christian Wisdom

  • PHE 616: Authentic Virtue/Christian Personalism (Dr. Donald DeMarco)
    This course will explore the difference between an authentic or true virtue and the counterfeit variety that is all too common in our contemporary secular world through the personalist contributions of Socrates, Kierkegaard, Buber, Tillich, Marcel, Maritain, Berdyaev, John Paul II, and others.
  • PHS 751: The True, the False, the Lie and the Fake (Dr. Curtis Hancock)
    This course is a s study the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas about truth and its opposites, the false, the lie, and the fake in relationship to unity and multiplicity, being and non-being, and good and evil; and different kinds of falsehood, considered in themselves and in relation to their existence within human knowing faculties, appetites, and in relationship to God.
  • PHS 783 Dante’s Divine Comedy: Thomistic Philosophy in Narrative (Dr. Sebastian Mahfood, OP, and Dr. Michela Ferri)
    This course examines Dante’s Divine Comedy, one canto a day for one hundred days with breaks following the Inferno and the Purgatorio. The work is read as a narrativization of the works of St. Thomas Aquinas, a way to experience a successful merger of theology and philosophy.

Ethics

  • PHE 505 Narrative and the Moral Life (Dr. Randall Colton)
    This course examines the ethical influence of stories by focusing on philosophical analyses of narrative and the moral life. Topics may include: the sources and limits of narratives’ moral power; their nature and structure; principles for the ethical evaluation of stories and their readers; and stories in Catholic spirituality.
  • PHE 663 Natural Law (Dr. Maciej Bazela)
    This course includes topics such as enlightenment jurisprudence and the “Culture of Death,” the foundations of the natural law, how the natural law works, natural law as a basis for good laws, and natural law in Catholic moral teaching.
  • PHE 680: Marriage and Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course introduces Catholic sexual ethics using the work of John Paul II, and examines the significant philosophical thought of Karol Wojtyla on this topic in his Love and Responsibility and Theology of the Body.
  • PHE 841: Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.

History of Philosophy

  • PHH 792: Philosophy of Edith Stein (Dr. John Finley)
    This course examines the intellectual life and writings of Edith Stein, or as she was later called, Sister Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, including her attempt to relate the phenomenological and Thomistic traditions of philosophy and her analysis of human personhood.
  • PHH 793: Plato’s Republic (Dr. Richard Geraghty)
    This course provides a Catholic investigation of one of the great seminal works of philosophy. The Church has a tradition of faith and reason by which man flies to the fullness of truth, we will be trying to give the wing of reason a good work out.

Systematic Philosophy

  • PHS 607: Philosophy for Theologians (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.
  • PHS 721: Philosophy of Science (Dr. Peter Mango)
    The course will examine the purpose of science and the reliability of scientific theories as these overlap with metaphysics and epistemology and consider the historical origins, methods and implications of “science” in both its ancient and its modern sense as well as the sociocultural implications of scientific claims within the history of ideas and of appeals to “science” for philosophical anthropology and ethics.

Summative Evaluation

  • ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing (Prof. Cynthia Buttjer and Dr. Daniel Van Slyke)
    This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Master of Arts in Theology

New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians. You may take any core course at the same time.

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.
  • DTH 600 Introduction to Theology (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course explains why modern European ideas both within and outside the Catholic Church have led to the conclusion that faith is contrary to reason; examines the relationship of theology, the science of faith, to reason, emphasizing why theology is the queen of the sciences identifying its nature and method; and shows the nature of the act of faith itself and how it relates to other kinds of human knowledge.

Core Courses Offered

  • DTH 731: One and Triune God (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course studies God, One and Three. It considers the divine nature and the trinity of persons in God, attending particularly to the theology of St. Augustine, of St. Thomas Aquinas, and of the contemporary Church.
  • DTH 751 Christology (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas.
  • MTH 611: Fundamental Moral Theology I (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. . Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience.
  • SAS 651 Synoptic Gospels (Fr. Randy Soto)
    This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

Courses Offered by Concentration

Apologetics

  • APO 512 Apologetics (Prof. Patrick Madrid)
    This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.
  • APO 555 Theology & Science (Sr. Carla Mae Streeter, OP, and Dr. Tom Sheahen)
    This course examines the relation between the disciplines and worldviews of modern science and Christian theology with the aim of providing a scientifically informed, theological understanding and appreciation of nature as God’s work of creation.
  • PAS 531 Theology of Social Media (Dr. Kristina Olsen)
    This course explores the history, trends, and issues related to the Catholic Church and its use of media for social communications. Students discuss how media is “social” and how this can be used to “introduce people to the life of the Church and help our contemporaries to discover the face of Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for 44th World Communications Day, 2010).

Bioethics

  • BIE 625: Catholic Bioethics (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson and Prof. Judith Babarsky)
    This interdisciplinary course prepares students for pastoral service through an intensive review of the teachings of the Catholic Church regarding the sanctity and dignity of human life from the moment of conception until natural death. Topics include the most challenging and difficult moral and medical issues in the field of contemporary bioethics.
  • BIE 795: Gospel of Life and Culture of Death (Dr. Donald DeMarco)
    This course covers the culture of death, the unity of life, love, and human dignity, the notion of freedom in Evangelium Vitae, real vs. counterfeit virtues, the roots of Evangelium Vitae in natural law, Sacred Scripture and the Catholic tradition, and the new feminism. Online

Church History

  • CHH 613: The Church in America (Fr. Gregoire Fluet)
    This course surveys the Church’s growth in America, especially in the United States, from 1492 to the present. Topics such as patronage, missionary activities, religious orders, persecution, the immigrant Church, the maturing of the Church, and contemporary tensions are studied.
  • CHH 671: Documents of Vatican II (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course introduces the history of Vatican II and the content of the documents. Topics include the background of the Council, the nature of the Church, inner spiritual renewal, the Church and the world, and the effects of the Council. (Cross-listed as DTH 671)
  • CHH 708: History of the Church from 1400 (Fr. Peter Kucer, MSA)
    This course continues CH 707. It includes topics such as the Western Schism, Renaissance, the Reformation and the Council of Trent, Jansenism, the Enlightenment, French Revolution, the First and Second Vatican Councils, and the twentieth century “isms.”

Dogmatic Theology

  • DTH 671: Documents of Vatican II (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course introduces the history of Vatican II and the content of the documents. Topics include the background of the Council, the nature of the Church, inner spiritual renewal, the Church and the world, and the effects of the Council. (Cross-listed as CHH 671)
  • DTH 757: Pneumatology (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course studies the Person and work of the Holy Spirit, including the power and presence of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament, the life of Jesus, the New Testament, and the Church, with emphasis on the Spirit’s primary role in the New Evangelization.
  • DTH 910: Spiritual Theology (Fr. Brian Mullady, OP)
    This course is a systematic study of Christian holiness based on Sacred Scripture and classical writers considering the virtues and gifts of the Holy Spirit, prayer, spiritual direction, and the stages of the life of grace.

Moral Theology

  • CLA 715: Canon Law of Marriage (Dr. Philippe Yates)
    This course introduces student(s) to the canon law of marriage through a systematic presentation and study of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, reflecting on the sacred canons themselves (cc. 1055-1165 and 1671-1707), their purpose, nature, context, history, and theological meaning.
  • MTH 680 Marriage & the Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course introduces Catholic sexual ethics using the work of John Paul II, and examines the significant philosophical thought of Karol Wojtyla on this topic in his Love and Responsibility and Theology of the Body.
  • MTH 841 Catholic Social Teachings (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.
  • STM 618 Governmental Structures (Canon Law) (Msgr. James Ramacciotti)
    Governmental Structures is an investigation of the power of government in the Church, focused in the hierarchical constitution of Church, as found in Book Two of the 1983 Code (cc. 330-572). Envisioned outcomes: an appreciation for the role of Canon Law in the life of the Church; an ability to interpret the law, given the context and subject matter of a particular Canon; a sense of canonical equity as a tool for the work of a shepherd in the Church; an ability to fulfill the function of Church leadership by empowering the people of God in their rights and obligations. Format: audio lectures and posted discussions.

Sacred Scripture

  • SAS 661: Gospel of John (Fr. William Mills)
    This course studies the Gospel of John considering the historical, religious, and cultural background of this gospel and major themes such as covenant, Kingdom of God, grace, redemption, wisdom, prophecy, creation, Trinity, faith, angels, resurrection and priesthood.
  • SAS 602: Methods of Theology and Scripture Analysis (Fr. Randy Soto)
    The course examines concepts and criteria used in Biblical Sciences: word, Revelation, transmission, Truth in Scripture, Canonicity, Authenticity, Integrity, Magisterium, Tradition, etc., and acquaints the students with the Books of the Bible per se: languages; traditions.
  • SAS 631: Wisdom Literature (Fr. Randy Soto)
    This course views sapiential literature (Job, Proverbs, Sirach, Qohelet, Psalms and Song of Songs) as an expression of Israel’s spirituality both at the time of its writing and today.
  • SAS 671: Letters of St Paul (Fr. William Mills)
    This course studies the composition, structure, purpose, historical background and theological themes of the Pauline letters with an exegesis of selected passages.
  • SS 706: Letter to the Romans (Fr. William Mills)
    This course is an in depth look at Paul’s Letter to the Romans. Next to Paul’s letter to the Galatians, Romans is Paul’s most important letters and is essential for understanding Paul’s message to the Church, both in the first century and today.

Summative Evaluation

  • ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing Prof. Cynthia Buttjer and Dr. Daniel Van Slyke
    This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies

(MAPS courses may be taken as electives within the MA in Theology Degree Program)

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

  • PAS 601: Fundamentals of Pastoral Theology (Fr. Dominic Anaeto)
    This course reflects on the identity of the church and its praxis, the ultimate point of reference is the praxis of Jesus Christ himself, examining the pastoral shift from Vatican Council I to Vatican II.

Core Courses Offered

  • PAS 985: Pastoral Issues concerning Human Sexuality (Fr. Dominic Anaeto)
    This course addresses the meaning of human sexuality, education and integration of emotion, sexual aberrations, relationship skills such as intra- and inter-personal skills, personal freedom skills, sexuality and spirituality, human sexuality and eschatology.

Concentration Courses Offered

Marriage & Family

  • MTH 680: Marriage & the Theology of the Body (Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson)
    This course introduces Catholic sexual ethics using the work of John Paul II, and examines the significant philosophical thought of Karol Wojtyla on this topic in his Love and Responsibility and Theology of the Body.

Spiritual Direction

  • PAS 531: Theology of Social Media (Dr. Kristina Olsen)
    This course explores the history, trends, and issues related to the Catholic Church and its use of media for social communications. Students discuss how media is “social” and how this can be used to “introduce people to the life of the Church and help our contemporaries to discover the face of Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for 44th World Communications Day, 2010).
  • PAS 705: Spiritual Care in the Hospital (Fr. Jerome Madumelu)
    This course introduces students to the arts and sciences of hospital spiritual care as an interdisciplinary endeavor by examining how psychology, sociology, economics and politics interface in the provision of hospital spiritual care services.

Summative Evaluation

  • ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing Prof. Cynthia Buttjer and Dr. Daniel Van Slyke
    This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.