Course Catalog


Course Catalog

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is dedicated to offering a setting of academic excellence by providing a wide range of courses to help enrich and cultivate its students to be leaders in their Catholic communities.

Please select a subject from the list below to see a list of courses with abbreviated information in that particular area.

** Summer 2017 Semester begins May 8 **

APO 512 Apologetics This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith. Online and on campus.

APO 531 Toward a 21st-Century Catholic World View This course will challenge the student to understand more of the reasons for polarities in the past and viewpoints presenting truth in a fresh manner. On campus only.

APO 565 Reading Science in the Light of Faith This course teaches the non-scientist layperson how to articulate developments in current research in biological or biochemical fields (with particular emphasis on evolutionary biology, genetics, or neuroscience) by reading scientific papers and how to classify the conclusions in the scientific papers as neutral, contradictory, or consistent with the tenets of Catholic faith. Online and on campus.

APO 620 Evolution & Catholic Thought This course explores the theory of evolution and sources of Catholic teaching regarding whether evolution is an ‘acceptable’ concept within the Church. Can also be used for credit in CHH 620. Online only.

APO 631 Social Media and the New Evangelization This course explores the history, trends, and issues related to the Catholic Church and its use of media for social communications. Students discuss how media is “social” and how this can be used to “introduce people to the life of the Church and help our contemporaries to discover the face of Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for 44th World Communications Day, 2010). Online only. Cross-referenced as PAS 631 Theology of Social Media.

APO 652 New Atheism This course focuses on the nature of the New Atheism and the attempt it is making to secure political power in its assault against the faith. Online only.

BIE 625 Catholic Bioethics This interdisciplinary course prepares students for pastoral service through an intensive review of the teachings of the Catholic Church regarding the sanctity and dignity of human life from the moment of conception until natural death. Topics include the most challenging and difficult moral and medical issues in the field of contemporary bioethics. Can also be used for credit in MTH 625. Online and on campus.

BIE 639 Bioethics & the Law This course introduces basic constitutional, statutory, and regulatory law related to bioethics. United States Supreme Court case law is a central component of the course. The course will examine the development of constitutional substantive due process, privacy, individual autonomy, and equal protection. The structure of American constitutional government, the separation of powers, the protection of individual liberties, and related political and philosophical foundations are examined. Online and on campus.

BIE 651 Medical Ethics This course begins with the background out of which the Catholic Medical Ethics grew, and then explores the modern situation and its failure will be described and the contemporaneous need for the religious traditions to exercise their appropriate influence will be affirmed. On campus only.

BIE 653 Guiding Principles of Catholic Medical Ethics This course explores the extraordinary challenges, both medical and moral, currently facing Health care in the U.S. The Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, will be used to overview critical topics in Catholic medical ethics. Requires separate enrollment with the National Catholic Bioethics Center. Online only.

BIE 661 Biology & Biotechnologies for Ethicists This course focuses on the basic biological principles related to ethical issues such as in vitro fertilization and other reproductive technologies, embryonic and adult stem cells, artificial contraception, and genetic engineering from the standpoint of the Catholic faith. Online only.

BIE 673 Catholic Bioethics & the Dignity of the Human Person This course examines key areas of modern bioethics, and be able to articulate the major ethical concerns raised by these issues and areas where ethical ambiguity may still exist from the vantage point of Catholic teaching. Requires separate enrollment with the National Catholic Bioethics Center. Online only.

BIE 675 Case Studies & Applied Topics This course examines a number of bioethical topics and critically analyzes case studies from a Catholic perspective, including research ethics, ethics committee process topics, beginning and endof-life ethical issues, selected clinical issues. Online only.

BIE 795 Gospel of Life & Culture of Death This course covers the culture of death, the unity of life, love, and human dignity, the notion of freedom in Evangelium Vitae, real vs. counterfeit virtues, the roots of Evangelium Vitae in natural law, Sacred Scripture and the Catholic tradition, and the new feminism. Online and on campus.

CHH 263 Catholic Response During World War II This course examines the Catholic response during World War II. Topics include a review of the Papal response, including Pius XI and Pius XII; the martyrdom of St. Maximilian Kolbe and St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross; and exposure to the holocaust in literature and film. Online only.

CHH 300 Church History This course examines the history of the Catholic Church as a point of evangelization. Topics to be examined will include development of the early Church, the Age of the Fathers, the Dark Ages, the Middle Ages, the Reformation period, and the Modern Era. Online and on campus.

CHH 613 The Church in America This course surveys the Church’s growth in America, especially in the United States, from 1492 to the present. Topics such as patronage, missionary activities, religious orders, persecution, the immigrant Church, the maturing of the Church, and contemporary tensions are studied. Online and on campus.

CHH 622 Scottish Monasticism This course partners with Christology for the purpose of an intercultural study tour to Scotland and will not only explain the history and causes of Scottish monasticism but also do so during a fourweek tour of the Scottish abbeys and monasteries in the vicinity of Castle Kilcoy near Muir of Ord and Tore on the Black Isle, in Ross and Cromarty, Scotland. Online and onsite in Inverness, Scotland.

CHH 630 Spanish Mysticism This course explores Spanish Mysticism in the lives and writings of St. Teresa of Jesus and St. John of the Cross. Students will spend the first part of the course reading and preparing for a four- week study in Avila, Spain, where they will develop an appreciation for the cultural context of Spanish mysticism through excursions to key historic, cultural and religious sites. Online only and onsite in Avila, Spain.

CHH 631 Mystical Theology in the Church Fathers This course focuses on selected writings of representative Eastern and Western Church Fathers to gain a better understanding of and appreciation for their teachings on contemplative prayer and the journey of the soul to Divine Union. On campus only.

CHH 651 Counter Reformation This course explores the causes of the Reformation; the Council of Trent; Counter-Reformation popes and religious orders; saints and foundresses; France, the field of battle; Thirty Years War and the Peace of Westphalia. On campus only.

CHH 661 Catholic Modernism This course reviews Catholic modernism and addresses the intellectual causes of modernism and its major components. The study includes magisterial statements of Pius X concerning modernism and exposure to the works of several important Catholic modernists. Online only.

CHH 671 Documents of Vatican II This course introduces the history of Vatican II and the content of the documents. Topics include the background of the Council, the nature of the Church, inner spiritual renewal, the Church and the world, and the effects of the Council. Online and on campus.

CHH 675 Spirituality of St. John Paul II In order to better understand what influenced St. John Paul II’s spiritual life and made him a saint, this course will look, among other things, at the history of Poland, its intense Catholic culture, his own Marian spirituality and the influence which the great Carmelite mystics had on him. On campus only.

CHH 707 History of the Church to 1400 This course surveys the first fourteen centuries of the Church, studying the major forces, events and persons shaping the growth and development of Christianity in the East and West. Online and on campus.

CHH 708 History of the Church from 1400 This course continues CH 707. It includes topics such as the Western Schism, Renaissance, the Reformation and the Council of Trent, the Enlightenment, French Revolution, the First and Second Vatican Councils, and the twentieth century “isms.” Online and on campus.

CHH 881 Patristics This course surveys selected writings from the principal Fathers of the Church. The focus is on the development of Catholic Doctrine from the Apostolic Fathers to St. Gregory the Great, with emphasis on the Trinitarian and Christological questions. Online and on campus.

CLA 601 Fundamentals of Canon Law The course introduces students to ecclesiastical law through a systematic presentation and study of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, reflecting on the purpose, nature, content, history, background, and consequences of what ecclesiastical law achieves in the life of the Church. On campus only.

CLA 715 Canon Law of Marriage This course introduces student(s) to the canon law of marriage through a systematic presentation and study of the 1983 Code of Canon Law, reflecting on the sacred canons themselves (cc. 1055-1165 and 1671-1707), their purpose, nature, context, history, and theological meaning. Online and on campus.

CLA 719 Canon Law of Religious Life This course examines Canon Law for Institutes of Consecrated Life and Societies of Apostolic Life, which is a major section of Book II of the 1983 Code of Canon Law. All 173 canons will be considered. On campus only.

CLA 720 Institutes of Consecrated Life & Apostolic Societies The course explores the state of the consecrated life: an historical approach and her spiritual commitment; their implications and full knowledge of this state of life proposed by the Church as means of Christian perfection in the charity. On campus only.

CLA 781 Practical Problems in Jurisprudence This course enables students to answer frequent questions they face in their apostolate. Students will be trained in using canon law and the official documents of the Church in their mission. On campus only.

CLA 801 The Code of Canons of the Eastern Church This course explains the importance of the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches due to the Code of Canon Law and Pastor Bonus forming one juridical body of the Catholic Church. On campus only.

DTH 101 Intro to Theology This course introduces the sources, topics, and history of theology as a foundation for further study. Attention is given to the origins of doctrine and its form, important to almost all branches of theology. Online only.

DTH 512 Spiritual Life in the Classics This course provides a study of the great spiritual writers with an emphasis will be on how the beautiful images and concepts in such classics can help us grow in our own union with God, and in our love of those we encounter in friendship, family, work and mission. On campus only.

DTH 600 Introduction to Theology This course explains why modern European ideas both within and outside the Catholic Church have led to the conclusion that faith is contrary to reason; examines the relationship of theology, the science of faith, to reason, emphasizing why theology is the queen of the sciences identifying its nature and method; and shows the nature of the act of faith itself and how it relates to other kinds of human knowledge. Online only.

DTH 601 Faith, Revelation & Grace This course focuses on God’s call to man (supernatural revelation, the nature of theology as science; Scripture, Tradition and Magisterium), man’s response in faith (the natural desire to see God; the states of human nature; the Old and New Law), and the role of grace (its necessity, character and effects as perfecting human nature). On campus only.

DTH 641 Protology & Eschatology This course studies God as the Creator of all things and the relation of created things to Him. The four last things (death, judgment, heaven and hell) are related to Him as the fulfillment of man and nature, the end of His saving plan. Online and on campus.

DTH 645 Nature & Grace This course examines the natural desire to see God; the controversy over the desire to see God; the state of human nature; the nature of the law; the new law of Christ – sanctifying grace; and the nature, necessity and effects of sanctifying grace. Online only.

DTH 646 Theological Anthropology This course examines human nature in relation to God as creator and as supernatural end, with attention to twentieth-century controversies and developments in Catholic theological anthropology. On campus only.

DTH 650 Sacraments of Initiation and Pneumatology This course begins with an introduction to the study of the Holy Spirit and His work within the Church. It moves on to a classical Thomistic sacramentology and examines the theology of Baptism, Confirmation, and the Most Holy Eucharist, attending to the Scriptural foundations, patristic development, medieval synthesis, and modern presentation of the material. Special care is taken with the theology of the Real Presence and Eucharistic Sacrifice. On campus only.

DTH 731 One and Triune God This course is a doctrinal study of the nature and attributes of God as known by revelation and reason. The God we know and love is One and Three. Topics in this course address both the unity of God and the three-ness of God. The work of St. Thomas Aquinas is used to expose students to these truths to be believed and to form a foundation for further growth and study. This course is a prerequisite to DTH 751 Christology. Online and on campus.

DTH 751 Christology This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas. Students registering for Christology must have already completed DTH 731 One and Triune God. Online and on campus.

DTH 752 Christology This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas and the work of John Paul II and Benedict XVI. Online and onsite in Inverness, Scotland, only.

DTH 757 Pneumatology This course studies the Person and work of the Holy Spirit, including the power and presence of the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament, the life of Jesus, the New Testament, and the Church, with emphasis on the Spirit’s primary role in the New Evangelization. On campus only.

DTH 760 Ecclesiology & Ecumenism This course investigates the nature and characteristics of the Church, its attributes, its structures, its mission and its relation to the world, and the development of Catholic thought concerning ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue. Online and on campus.

DTH 765 Mariology This course examines Marian doctrine in its scriptural, historical, and modern contexts using infallible statements, Lumen gentium, and post-conciliar documents. Online and on campus.

DTH 765 Mary, Mother of God & of the Church Students will study how Marian theology has developed over time. This historical approach to Marian Theology will be supplemented with careful study of Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange’s classical text on Mary – Mother of the Savior: And Our Interior Life. On campus only.

DTH 800 The Seven Sacraments (English) This course explores the concept and nature of “sacrament” in general and then each of the seven sacraments of the Church in particular (the fundamentals of each sacrament’s doctrine and theology, the rites for celebrating the sacraments, the historical development of each sacrament and current issues and debates surrounding the sacraments). Online only.

DTH 800S The Seven Sacraments (Spanish) La vida de perfección del Cristiano es ayudado por medio de la Palabra de Dios y los Sacramentos. La presentación de los siete sacramentos es una manera de ayudar a los cristianos, especialmente a los líderes de nuestra fe, a prepararse mejor y ayudar a los demás fieles en esta tarea de alcanzar la santidad de vida. Online only.

DTH 857 Soteriology This course explores the concepts of grace and justification in regards to the sacrifice of Jesus Christ and what it means for man’s cooperation with grace. Online only.

DTH 910 Spiritual Theology This course is designed to give the student a working knowledge of what is traditionally called ascetical and mystical theology but which implements the call of the Second Vatican Council to the various experiences and stages of growth in prayer in the universal call to holiness. Online and on campus.

DTH 965 Penance & Anointing This course treats sacramental confession and pastoral ministry to the sick, the dying and the bereaved, particularly Penance, Viaticum, Anointing of the Sick and the Mass and Rite of Christian Burial. On campus only. Seminarians only.

DTH 971 Priesthood & Celibacy This course studies the theology of the priesthood and the discipline of priestly celibacy. On campus only. Seminarians only.

ENG 131 Poetry This course introduces students to classics in poetry and focuses on close-reading and interpretative skills of representative authors. Particular attention is given to the lyric tradition with Wordsworth, Keats, Tennyson, C. Rossetti, Dickinson, and Hopkins. Online and on campus.

ENG 151 Drama This course surveys western dramatists from ancient Greece to today. Students will study dramas such as: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Lorca, and Pope St. John Paul II. Online and on campus.

ENG 181 Research and Writing Description TBA. Online and on campus.

ENG 221 Novels, Short Stories, & Literary Research This course examines classic and contemporary novels and short stories. Each student will write a paper with guidance through the research and drafting processes. Online and on campus.

ENG 300 Great Christian Literature This course introduces the student to select writings of Christian literature post-New Testament to the present. The material selected for discussion gives signposts to allow the student to gain a greater appreciation of Christian thought, wisdom, and eloquence. On campus only.

ENG 383 Dante’s Divine Comedy: Narrative Thomism This course examines Dante’s Divine Comedy, one canto a day for one hundred days, with breaks following the Inferno and the Purgatorio. Students will read the Divine Comedy as a narrativization of the works of St. Thomas Aquinas, a way to experience a successful merger of theology and philosophy. Online only.

ENG 400 Catholic English Literature This course examines the thoughtful and beautiful works of select English playwrights, poets, and novelists, including William Shakespeare, G.M.Hopkins, T.S. Eliot, Graham Greene, and Evelyn Waugh. Each student writes a paper on the literature with guidance through the research and drafting. Online only.

ENG 891 Academic Research, Design, & Writing This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper. Online only

FPA 151 Major Masters & Movements in Music In this course students will be introduced to the major masters, styles, and movements in music from the ancient world to the early 20th-Century. The social, political, historical and religious contexts that helped to shape the composers’ creative impulse will also be studied and critically analyzed. Online and on campus.

FPA 221 Fine Arts: Renaissance to the Present This course studies the artistic periods of the Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Impressionist, Fauvist, and various contemporary styles of Art such as Cubist, Dadaist, and Minimalist, and seeks to answer the questions, “What is Art?” and, “What is Good Art?” On campus only.

FPA 311 Fine Arts: Western Art History: Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Music, and Dance Students study western civilization through the medium of important art. The studies are supported by visual graphics. The class emphasizes oral questioning, working in groups, student presentations, and linking what is taught to the student’s background and life experiences. Online and on campus.

GRK 201 Greek I This course emphasizes basic grammar and vocabulary drawn from philosophic and biblical Greek texts, and provides a working vocabulary of terms used in both Attic and Koine dialects. Online and on campus.

GRK 202 Greek II This course builds on Greek I, emphasizes basic grammar and vocabulary drawn from philosophic and biblical Greek texts, and provides a working vocabulary of terms used in both Attic and Koine dialects. Prerequisite for Greek Readings. Online and on campus.

GRK 301 Greek III This course is third in a series of courses on Koine Greek, and continues the exploration of the language with selections from the New Testament, Septuagint, and Early Christian Writers. Short, project-based assessments help each student build a personalized Linguistic Toolkit. Online and on campus.

HIS 101 Western Civilization I This course studies the peoples of the Old Testament, the rise and fall of Greek and Roman civilizations, the birth of Christianity, the rise of Islam, the developments in the middle ages, the crusades, the Black Death, the Protestant reformation, and the Catholic counter-reformation. Online and on campus.

HIS 102 Western Civilization II This course continues the study of western civilization and covers the Thirty Years’ War as nations fought to restore a united Christendom, the Enlightenment, the revolutions in France and America, the Napoleonic Age, the two world wars, Vatican II, and more recent events. Online and on campus.

HIS 201 American History I The course surveys Pre-Columbus America and ends with the Civil War. Students examine the process of colonization, the Revolutionary War, the growth of the American Republic, and the issues that led to the secession of the south. This course will then continue with the history of the United States of America from the Reconstruction to the election of 2000. The student focuses on the persons who moved that history, seeing them as human being with both flaws and great talents. Online and on campus.

HIS 351 Eastern Civilization I This course covers the foundational thought and beliefs of Eastern Civilization stemming from its ancient history. These essential concepts and beliefs will be studied from a Catholic perspective with special reference to magisterial documents and papal writings. Online and on campus. Taught by Fr. Peter Kucer, MSA, in both modes of delivery.

HIS 352 Eastern Civilization II This course complements Eastern Civilization I by chronologically tracing the history of East and Southeast Asia from ancient times to modern times. In so doing, students learn about cultures, philosophies, and religions of East Asia. The course pays special attention to the role of Catholicism in East Asian history. Online and on campus.

HIS 520 French Revolution & the Modern Period This course examines the pivotal events of the French Revolution as a building block for modernity. The course considers the situation of the Church in this upheaval, as well as the dramatic changes that it effected. On campus only.

HUM 103  Humanities in the Ancient World  This course introduces the origin and development of the humanities, with an emphasis in the classical world. These branches of learning concerned with human thought and relations are distinguished from the sciences. Online and on campus.

HUM 104  Humanities in the Early Christian & Medieval World  This course covers the emergence and spread of Christianity as primary cultural phenomena from the time of Christ until the late middle ages, and introduces the major branches of the humanities-for example, the literature, philosophy, arts and architecture. Online and on campus.

LAT 201 Latin I This course introduces the student to the basics of Latin, with the aim of enabling the student to approach medieval and modern ecclesiastical Latin texts. It is the first of three courses designed to give the student the skills to read modern ecclesiastical Latin. Online and on campus.

LAT 202 Latin II This course builds on Latin I and familiarizes the student with the majority of Latin grammar and a significant amount of theological and philosophical Latin vocabulary. It is the second of three courses designed to give the student the skills to read modern ecclesiastical Latin. Online and on campus.

LAT 301 Latin III: Ecclesiastical This course transitions from learning the grammar and basic vocabulary to translating significant texts of ecclesiastical Latin. This course builds on LAT 101 and LAT 102. Online and on campus.

LLT 300 Intro to Liturgy This course explains that all theology is derived from the sacred Liturgy, the heart of Catholic faith and life. It will look at Liturgy as the starting point and the greatest teacher, opening to the mysteries of the Catholic faith. Online and on campus.

LLT 453 Liturgical Theology This course demonstrates how the Liturgy is the source and summit of the Christian Life as found in Sacrosanctum concilium, 10. Students examine liturgical theology especially in terms of its theological and spiritual dimensions, while integrating pastoral and canonical applications. Online and on campus.

LLT 505 Liturgical Time This course examines the Church’s theology of time, exploring the origins and development of the liturgical year of the Roman Rite, as well as how they were embodied in the life of the Church through the liturgy and various traditions. On campus only.

LLT 581 Liturgical Music Throughout Church history, liturgical music has been a source of prayerful beauty and mysticism. By listening to sacred music, reading Church documents and studying musical trends during different time periods, students explore the historical and religious forces that have shaped Catholic liturgical music in Western Europe and the United States.

LLT 590 Gregorian Chant This course provides a solid foundation in the prayer and practice of Gregorian Chant, focusing on both its spiritual and technical aspects. Through singing, listening and writing students study the components of chant, including sight-reading, notation, modes, rhythm, and vocal technique. On campus only.

LLT 611 Liturgy of the Hours This course examines the origins, development and structure of the Liturgy of the Hours (aka Divine Office), looking at the role it plays within the Church for priests and religious but also how it can be a means of personal sanctification for the laity. On campus only.

LLT 621 Liturgical History This course introduces the sources and developments of sacred liturgy in the Old Testament, early Christianity, medieval Latin Christianity, the post-Council of Trent period, the 19th and 20th century liturgical movements, and the revisions following the Second Vatican Council. On campus only.

LLT 641 The Eucharistic Liturgy of the Western Church This course examines the historical development of the Mass of the Roman Rite, both as a whole and in its individual elements, looking also at the theology and spirituality of the Mass, as well as the role of the arts in liturgy, current liturgical issues and the hermeneutic of continuity. On campus only.

LLT 650 Sacred Art & Music This course introduces the richness of sacred art and music as an integral part of the liturgy in the Latin Rite tradition, sharing in the overall purpose of the liturgy: the glory of God and the sanctification and edification of the faithful. On campus only.

LLT 651 Eucharistic Theology This course studies the Most Holy Sacrament of the Eucharist from the perspectives of sacramental theology, the development of doctrine, liturgical history, spirituality, liturgical law, and recent pastoral initiatives of the Magisterium. On campus only.

LLT 653 Liturgical Theology This course demonstrates how the Liturgy is the source and summit of the Christian Life as found in Sacrosanctum concilium, 10. Students examine liturgical theology especially in terms of its theological and spiritual aspects, while integrating pastoral and canonical applications. On campus only.

LLT 812 Pre-Deacon Practicum, Part 1 A liturgical tutorial for third year theology seminarians preparing for ordination to the diaconate, which gives them the liturgical training necessary to function as a deacon at Mass, preside over the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours and conduct Exposition and Benediction. No Credit. Seminarians only. On campus only.

LLT 813 Pre-Deacon Practicum, Part 2 A liturgical tutorial for third year theology seminarians preparing for ordination to the diaconate, which gives them the liturgical training necessary to function as a deacon at Mass, preside over the celebration of the Liturgy of the Hours and conduct Exposition and Benediction. No Credit. Seminarians only. On campus only.

LLT 820 Ordinary Form of the Mass Practicum, Part 1 A liturgical tutorial for deacons on how to properly celebrate the Ordinary Form of the Mass, which will familiarize the student with the editio typica tertia of the Roman Missal, the GIRM, as well as special liturgical aspects of the Ordinary Form of the Mass. No Credit. Seminarians only. On campus only.

LLT 821 Ordinary Form of the Mass Practicum, Part 2 A liturgical tutorial for deacons on how to properly celebrate the Ordinary Form of the Mass, which will familiarize the student with the 1962 Roman Missal, as well as special liturgical aspects of the Extraordinary Form of the Mass. No Credit. Seminarians only. On campus only.

LLT 830 Extraordinary Form of the Mass Practicum, Part 1 A liturgical tutorial for deacons on how to properly celebrate the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, which will familiarize the student with the 1962 Roman Missal, as well as special liturgical aspects of the Extraordinary Form of the Mass. No Credit. Seminarians only. On campus only.

LLT 831 Extraordinary Form of the Mass Practicum, Part 2 A liturgical tutorial for deacons on how to properly celebrate the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, which will familiarize the student with the 1962 Roman Missal, as well as special liturgical aspects of the Extraordinary Form of the Mass. No Credit. Seminarians only. On campus only.

MTH 300 Moral Theology This course introduces the foundational concepts of Catholic moral theology, and seeks to provide a mastery of the questions: What is moral theology? What are its underlying precepts? How can we use these to help ourselves and others lead a moral life? Online and on campus.

MTH 380 Theology of the Body This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage. Online and on campus.

MTH 611 Fundamental Moral Theology I This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of the classical Catholic moral tradition especially as represented by Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II. Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, and conscience. Online and on campus.

MTH 612 Fundamental Moral Theology II This course examines the nature of moral habit, virtue, and sin with the purpose of preparing priests and religion teachers, spiritual advisors, or other Christians to engage accurately in moral evaluation and formation. Online and on campus.

MTH 626 Ethical Issues Pertaining to Marriage & Family This course presents a series of theological/philosophical discussions on some of the controversial issues that center on marriage and the family such as rights, duties, contraception, sterilization, abortion, divorce, fidelity, same-sex unions, reproductive technologies, and the education of children. On campus only

MTH 659 Moral Magisterium of Saint John Paul II This course is devoted to the teachings of the Blessed Pope John Paul II in the area of moral theology. Specific topics addressed in this course include the sacred sources of Christian moral teaching, a correct understanding of human freedom, conscience and its application, Veritatis splendor; Evangelium vitae, and the theology of the body.

MTH 680 Marriage & Theology of the Body This course covers the biblical foundations for the Theology of the Body as expressed in the works of St. John Paul II, and seeks to relate the Theology of the Body in the practical encounters of life, love and Marriage. Online and on campus.

MTH 681 Theology of the Body: Sexual Difference & Complementarity This course will study the “Theology of the Body” as it was taught by Saint John Paul II in a series of General Audiences in which he offered a catechesis on human love and sexuality, based in Sacred Scripture and the Tradition of the Church. On campus only.

MTH 841 Catholic Social Teachings This course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein. Online and on campus.

MTH 851 Contemporary Moral Issues This course researches and evaluates selected significant moral questions confronting the Church and the world today, including such issues as abortion and euthanasia in their contemporary aspects, pressing issues in social justice, issues in business, environment, and media ethics, and critical issues in sexual ethics. Online and on campus.

MTH 991 Moral Virtues in Confession The purpose of this course is to locate the moral virtues within the context of confessional practice. Special attention is given to the virtue of justice and the material sins needed to fully help penitents and encourage a thorough examination of conscience. Online and on campus.

PAS 161 Catechism Pillars I & II This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II. Online and on campus.

PAS 162 Catechism Pillars III & IV This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study parts three and four of the Catechism, “Life in Christ” and “Christian Prayer,” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II. Online and on campus.

PAS 511 Mission & Evangelization This course explores biblical-theological foundations of mission, the forms of evangelization, education for evangelization, specific missionary vocation, challenges in evangelization and an exploration of St. John Paul II’s call for new ardor, expression, and method in evangelization. Online only.

PAS 601 Fundamentals of Pastoral Theology This course reflects on the identity of the church and its praxis, the ultimate point of reference is the praxis of Jesus Christ himself, examining the pastoral shift from the First Vatican Council to the Second. Online and on campus.

PAS 603 Principles of Parish Management and Operations This course focuses on developing an effective personal management style that is consistent with all principles of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, best serves the non-sacramental needs of parishioners, affords responsible custodianship of parish assets, and demonstrates best practices in leadership of lay and volunteer personnel. On campus only.

PAS 605 Intercultural Competencies This course explores the nature of intercultural competencies and engage the learner in methods concerning their development and cultivation within a community of faith. Online only.

PAS 607 Contemporary Youth Culture This course explores the culture of contemporary youth and its ramifications for catechesis. Students prepare to encounter the learner who is immersed in the secular, post-modern milieu. Families in contemporary culture, peer expectations, and the influence of media are addressed. On campus only.

PAS 612 Field Education This course involves engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 613 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 621 Pastoral Care of Marriage & Family This course will explore marriage as a spousal covenant from the biblical and traditional perspectives and consider how to minister to families, using as a basic text, John Paul II’s Magisterial Document, Familiaris consortio. Modern challenges to marriage will also be addressed. Online and on campus.

PAS 631 Social Media and the New Evangelization This course explores the history, trends, and issues related to the Catholic Church and its use of media for social communications. Students discuss how media is “social” and how this can be used to “introduce people to the life of the Church and help our contemporaries to discover the face of Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for 44th World Communications Day, 2010). Online only. Cross-referenced as APO 631.

PAS 641 Methods in Counseling This course presents appropriate methods in pastoral counseling. Online and on campus.

PAS 661 Catechism Pillars I & II This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study the first two parts, “The Profession of Faith” and “The Celebration of the Christian Mystery” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II. On campus only.

PAS 662 Catechism Pillars III & IV This course presents an overview of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. Students study parts three and four of the Catechism, “Life in Christ” and “Christian Prayer,” to grasp its presentation of truth in the light of Vatican Council II. On campus only.

PAS 668 Missionary Discipleship: Evangelization & Catechesis This course will consider evangelization, new evangelization and catechesis as “a remarkable moment in the whole process of evangelization” (John Paul II, Catechesi Tradendae) based on the mission of her Founder, “Go, teach . . .” (Matthew 28: 19). Online and on campus.

PAS 671 Spiritual Direction: Skills & Practice This course equips the participants with the technical skills for spiritual direction, skills which enable the participants go through personal discernment and help others in both personal and communitarian discernment for discovery of personal vocation and decision making. Online and on campus.

PAS 681 Pastoral Counseling This course will instill in the students the basic skill of a counselor, which is active listening. This involves not only listening to what the client says but more importantly to what he does not say. To attend to this basic skill of listening, the students should be equipped with the basic personal qualities of a counselor: Empathetic understanding, acceptance and genuineness. Online and on campus.

PAS 700 Christian Life Together in the Presence of Human, Physical, and Intellectual Impairments This course will draw us into a deeper understanding of Christian faith, vocation, catechesis, ministry & ecclesiology – in light of the presence and reality of physical & intellectual impairment among disciples. As part of the core of Christian life or ministry, our focus is pastoral & ecclesial; rather than clinical, medical, legal or psychological. Online and on campus.

PAS 701 Pastoral Theology I This course covers practical and theological topics for future pastors, including current resources, major pastoral challenges, boundaries and special settings such as prisons and hospitals. The course will examine the pastoral shift from Vatican Council I to Vatican II designing a new pastoral methodology. 4th year seminarians only. On campus only.

PAS 702 Pastoral Theology II This course addresses issues of need in the pastoral realm with directives as to the shepherding tasks of the parish priest together with a description of the necessary skills. This part II of Pastoral Theology will focus more on the concrete pastoral situations. 4th year seminarians only. On campus only.

PAS 703 Clinical Pastoral Education This course addresses the fundamentals of pastoral formation, pastoral competence and pastoral reflection and provides an interfaith professional education for ministry that brings theological students and ministers of all faiths (pastors, priests, rabbis, imams and others) into supervised encounter with persons in crisis. Online only.

PAS 705 Spiritual Care in the Hospital This course locates the place of spiritual care in health-care management/services. Spirituality forms a significant piece of the puzzle in the holistic care of a person who happens to be sick. Discussed are the ethical issues, professional expectations, philosophical and theoretical bases. Online only.

PAS 706 Auto-Formation in Light of Pastores Dabo Vobis This course emphasizes personal involvement in appropriating formation and promotes freedom with responsibility for human maturity cannot materialize without a strong training in freedom (Pastores Dabo Vobis 44). On campus only.

PAS 712 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 713 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 741 D. Von Hildebrand & C.S. Lewis on Love In this course the nature of love as explored by Dietrich Von Hildebrand and C.S. Lewis, will be studied from the philosophical, spiritual and psychological perspectives. Topics will include what love is, types of love, loving and unloving masculine/feminine traits, marriage and family, friendship and ethical choices. Online and on campus.

PAS 751 Homiletics I This course develops preaching skills for ordination to the diaconate and priesthood with attention on the spiritual formation of the preacher. Student develop public speaking skills through constructive critique. Reserved for the ordained or those preparing for ordination. Seminarians only. On campus only.

PAS 785 Pastoral Issues concerning Human Sexuality This course addresses the meaning of human sexuality, education and integration of emotion, sexual aberrations, relationship skills such as intra- and inter-personal skills, personal freedom skills, sexuality and spirituality, human sexuality and eschatology. Online and On campus.

PAS 791 Morals & Psychology This course concerns the mutual influence of the life of reason and the emotions on moral practice with emphasis on the nature of emotions, repressive and affirmation neuroses, freedom of the will in neurotics, and the influence of moral practice on the prevention of neuroses. Online and on campus.

PAS 795 Fundamental Human Formation This course focuses on self-knowledge, formation in Christ and cooperation with the grace of God. To that end, it draws on work on attachment, human development, boundaries, homosexuality, trauma, addiction and the essence of masculinity and femininity. Seminarians only. On campus only.

PAS 812 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 813 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 891 Methods in Teaching This course is designed to engage students in the study of teaching methods for face-to-face and online learning environments. Online only.

PAS 912 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 913 Field Education This course will involve engagement in a given field. No credit. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PAS 951 Homiletics II This course builds on, and develops the skills learned, in Homiletics I so the student can prepare and deliver homilies with passion and conviction. Pre-requisite PAS 751 Homiletics I. Seminarian only. On campus only.

PHE 341 The Nature of Love In this course the nature of love, will be studied from philosophical, spiritual and psychological perspectives. Topics will include what love is, types of love, loving and unloving masculine/feminine traits, marriage and family, friendship, obstacles to love. The concepts of love of C.S. Lewis and Dietrich Von Hildebrand will be foundational to the course. On campus and online.

PHE 422 Christian Social Ethics This course is an application of basic Christian principles to the political, economic and social spheres. It includes analysis of questions of wealth and poverty, cultural development, war and peace, and Christian involvement in government. On campus only.

PHE 425 Fundamental Bioethics This course studies the philosophical foundations for several ethical viewpoints concerning human life and the use of medical technologies, focusing primarily on the Catholic position rooted in personalistic principles. Online and on campus.

PHE 450 Ethics This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics. Online and on campus.

PHE 505 Narrative & the Moral Life This course examines the ethical influence of stories by focusing on philosophical analyses of narrative and the moral life. Topics may include: the sources and limits of narratives’ moral power; their nature and structure; principles for the ethical evaluation of stories and their readers; and stories in Catholic spirituality. Online only.

PHE 610 Ethics This course studies the principles of ethics from a Thomistic and phenomenological perspective including criteria for making moral choices and a refutation of situation ethics, and addresses social justice, abortion, war and peace and sexual ethics. Online and on campus.

PHE 615 Nicomachean Ethics The course will consist of large selected portions of The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle The intent is to show the pagan material which aided St. Thomas Aquinas in his formulation of his Christian Moral Theology and Moral Philosophy. Online only.

PHE 616 Authentic Virtue/Christian Personalism This course will explore the difference between an authentic or true virtue and the counterfeit variety that is all too common in our contemporary secular world through the personalist contributions of Socrates, Kierkegaard, Buber, Tillich, Marcel, Maritain, Berdyaev, John Paul II, and others. Online and on campus.

PHE 663 Natural Law This course includes topics such as enlightenment jurisprudence and the “Culture of Death,” the foundations of the natural law, how the natural law works, natural law as a basis for good laws, and natural law in Catholic moral teaching. Online only.

PHE 680 Marriage and Theology of the Body This course introduces Catholic sexual ethics using the work of John Paul II, and examines the significant philosophical thought of Karol Wojtyla on this topic in his Love and Responsibility and Theology of the Body. Online and on campus.

PHE 775 Political Philosophy This course seeks to introduce students to political philosophy by undertaking a critical historical study of the most influential works (ancient, medieval, and modern) of the Western tradition. Students will study and analyze the fundamental issues that have shaped the debate throughout the centuries, including the nature of justice, law and liberty, power and authority, political equality, human rights, and the relation of Church and the state. Within this context various forms of governments will be examined, such as democracy, monarchy, and socialistic and communistic states. Online only.

PHE 796 Virtue, Personalism, and the Secular World This course develops the thesis that the heart of true virtue (Christian virtue) is love and is enacted through the person. The personalist philosophies of Wojtyla, Marcel, Maritain, Kierkegaard, Buber, Tillich and others are closely examined. On campus only.

PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings This course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein. Online only.

PHH 301 History of Ancient Philosophy This course studies the most representative thinkers of ancient philosophy, beginning with Plato, Socrates and Aristotle and ending with St. Augustine and Boethius. Online and on campus.

PHH 304 History of Medieval Philosophy This course will introduce students to medieval philosophy and, in addition to focusing on major thinkers such as Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Thomas Aquinas, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham, examine its importance today in such topics as the nature and existence of God, the relationship between faith and reason, and the human soul and its faculties. Online and on campus. PHH 401 History of Modern Philosophy This course examines the classical modern philosophers beginning with Descartes, Spinoza, Hobbes, and ending with the 19th century idealist Hegel. Online and on campus.

PHH 404 History of Contemporary Philosophy This course examines the views of various 20th and 21st century philosophers on issues in ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, and other areas of thought. Online and on campus.

PHH 605 Ancient & Medieval Philosophy This course covers some of the most important figures and themes of Ancient & Medieval philosophy, including Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, the nature of man, education, the ultimate end of human activity, the meaning of life, God, Providence, and faith and reason. Online only.

PHH 620 Modern & Contemporary Philosophy This course is an historical introduction to the thought and texts of principal modern philosophers from Descartes to Hegel and of principal contemporary philosophers from Kierkegaard to the present. Online only.

PHH 650 Recent Catholic Philosophy This course introduces important Catholic philosophers of the nineteenth and twentieth-centuries who responded to the cultural, scientific, philosophical, and theological ideas of the times, and defended the philosophical underpinnings of the Catholic faith. Online only.

PHH 651 Aristotle This course will cover selections from Aristotle’s works of the Categories, the Physics, the De Anima, the Metaphysics, and the Nicomachean Ethics in order to show that reading Aristotle is still the best introduction to philosophy there is. The reason is that Aristotle, inspired by his teacher Plato who in turn was inspired by Socrates, showed that the ability to philosophize is natural to man. In pursuing an understanding of this, we will employ the Pagan Aristotle and the Christian Aquinas as our guides. Online Only.

PHH 681 Arabic Philosophy This course examines the historical and systematic development of philosophy as an aid to theology produced in the Arabic-speaking world during the classical period of Arabic scholasticism from alKindi (in the early 9th century) to Ibn Rushd (in the late 12th century). Online only.

PHH 781 Philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas This course covers Aquinas on medieval education, the rise of universities, faith and reason, Aristotelian thought, Aquinas on the world and man, man as a moral agent, the meaning of life, the ultimate end of human action, difference between knowledge and faith; God. Online only.

PHH 792 Philosophy of Edith Stein This course examines the intellectual life and writings of Edith Stein, or as she was later called, Sister Teresa Benedicta of the Cross, including her attempt to relate the phenomenological and Thomistic traditions of philosophy and her analysis of human personhood, her account of the nature and vocation of woman, and her discussion of the ways in which we can know God. Online only.

PHH 793 Plato’s Republic This course provides a Catholic investigation of one of the great seminal works of philosophy. The Church has a tradition of faith and reason by which man flies to the fullness of truth, we will be trying to give the wing of reason a good work out. Online only.

PHS 100 St. Thomas Aquinas’s Philosophical and Theological Principles of Leadership and Organization This course will consider the nature of St. Thomas Aquinas’s teaching about the nature of leadership and organizations. It will also explore how to manage organizations in light of his teaching about the psychological faculties, habits and virtues of human nature and explain how these relate to human leadership. Online only.

PHS 311 Logic This course introduces the basic structures of sound thinking, analytic reading, and the evaluation of arguments, the latter through practice in Aristotelian logic and examination of the three acts of the mind in Aristotelian-Thomistic philosophy. Online and on campus.

PHS 414 Epistemology This course gives an insight into classical answers to Aristotelian, Socratic, and Platonic questions and give students the tools to devise their own responses. Online and on campus.

PHS 415 Philosophy of God This course is an examination of the existence of God, His nature and relation to the world and man. Online and on campus.

PHS 421 Philosophy of Nature This course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods. Online and on campus.

PHS 450 Philosophy of Man This course will study human nature from two perspectives: 1. We will begin with an examination of the humanity in light of the twentieth century Catholic philosophical tradition, one which begins its examination of the human person in light of lived experience. 2. We will then proceed to understand human nature as developed in the Medieval Catholic tradition, especially as it is presented through the work of St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor. You will be expected to apply what you have learned to modern challenges to the dignity of the human person. Online and on campus.

PHS 471 Aesthetics in Sacred Art This course explores the various elements of Aesthetics in “Sacred Christian Art”, in comparison with secular Christian Arts of religious themes, and in comparison with Art in general. We learn the specifics of Christian theological, doctrinal, theosophical and philosophical thought foundations as they relate to Aesthetics in Sacred Arts and examine their evolution through the ages. Students will recognize and develop an appreciation for the uniqueness of the Aesthetics used in Christian Arts through their multiple facets, intended relation, and effect on the human senses both cognitively, symbolically and spiritually. Online only.

PHS 490 Metaphysics Metaphysics is that most general investigation of philosophy that attempts to arrive at reasoned judgments about how things really are. This course presents a comprehensive introduction to Aristotelian and Thomistic metaphysics. Topics included are the nature of metaphysics as a science and its subject matter; the distinction between being and essence; and the analogy of being. Online and on campus.

PHS 507 Compendium of Scholastic Philosophy I This course provides a philosophical survey of the Scholastic Philosophy, especially the AristotelianThomistic approach to main philosophical questions. Topics include the elements of Aristotelian Logic about the three acts of the human mind (simple apprehension, judgment and reasoning; notions about first principles, demonstration and science), natural psychology (philosophy of nature, matter and form, motion, place and time and the First Unknown Mover), and rational psychology or philosophy of man (life and soul, cognition including sensation, perception and intellection, appetition including sensitive appetites and volition, and, finally, a reflection on the nature of man). On campus only.

PHS 508 Compendium of Scholastic Philosophy II A continuation of PHS 507. This course provides a philosophical survey of the Scholastic Philosophy, especially the Aristotelian-Thomistic approach to main philosophical questions. Topics include the elements of metaphysics (being, transcendentals, substance and subsistence, causality), epistemology (knowledge, truth and falsity, evidence and certitude), natural theology (proofs of God’s existence, God’s essence, entitative and operative attributes, divine causality, the problem of evil), and ethics (moral philosophy, the human act, the ends of human act, voluntarity and involuntarity, morality and responsibility, law and right reason, the life of virtue, justice and rights). On campus only. Pre-requisite for PHS 507.

PHS 541 Natural Theology This course examines arguments for the existence of God, His nature and relation to the world and man. Online only.

PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology. Online and on campus.

PHS 610 Philosophical Anthropology This course studies human nature from the perspective of the perennial tradition of Catholic philosophy, as well as that of Catholic phenomenological and existential insights. Online and on campus.

PHS 611 Logic and Epistemology This course surveys twin foundations upon which all philosophy depends relying on Aristotelian insights as developed by the great Christian philosophers of the Middle Ages, and develops these in the light of contributions from modern and contemporary philosophy. Online only.

PHS 620 Plato and his Philosophical and Theological Legacy This course pursues a grasp of the pervasive influence of Plato on the rest of Western philosophy and theology in terms of method and content. On campus only.

PHS 621 Philosophy of Nature & Metaphysics This course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods, along with the metaphysics of Aristotle; presuppositions of metaphysics, the subject matter of metaphysics, the scandal of generality, substance and essence, from finite to Infinite Being, the nature of existence, the names of God. Online only.

PHS 641 Reason in the Theology of St. Thomas This course explores and applies as a solution to some of the most acute problems discussed in modern theology Aquinas’s third way, expressed in the Summa Theologica (I, q. 32 a. 1), of using reason in sacred theology, the first two ways being explained in the Summa Contra Gentiles involving Natural Theology and a movement from principles of Faith revealed through Jesus Christ. Online only.

PHS 647 The Exiled God: Atheism and Its Causes This course studies the roots and expressions of modern and “new” atheisms, tracing their intellectual and cultural roots. Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, and Marx are examined. On campus only. PHS 657 Phenomenology This course introduces phenomenology as a way of doing philosophy, and in particular, as a study of human experience. Online and on campus.

PHS 671 Aesthetics The discipline of Aesthetics emerged in the modern period consequent upon the separation of the transcendental qualities True, Good, and Beautiful from each other, and the emergence of a notion of “fine art” dedicated to beauty. We will argue that this differentiation is a good thing, provided we can begin to see these three in their complex interrelationship and relate fine art to the broader human capacity of making. Online and on campus.

PHS 721 Philosophy of Science The course examines the purpose of science and the reliability of scientific theories as these overlap with metaphysics and epistemology and consider the historical origins, methods and implications of “science” in both its ancient and its modern sense as well as the sociocultural implications of scientific claims within the history of ideas and of appeals to “science” for philosophical anthropology and ethics. Online only.

PHS 731 The One & the Many This course is a study of the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas concerning the nature of the metaphysical principles of unity and multiplicity and the essential role that these principles play in the existence of things and all other principles of being, becoming, and knowing, including those of experience, art, philosophy, science. Online only.

PHS 741 St. Thomas Aquinas on Being & Nothingness This course will help students to learn the most important metaphysical doctrines of St. Thomas. It presents an understanding of reality from Being itself (God) to nothingness (complete absence of being). We shall mostly focus on primary texts from Aquinas, but, when appropriate, we shall read selections from other thinkers who have influenced Aquinas, such as Aristotle and St. Augustine. Online only.

PHS 751 The True, the False, the Lie & the Fake This course is a s study the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas about truth and its opposites, the false, the lie, and the fake in relationship to unity and multiplicity, being and non-being, and good and evil; and different kinds of falsehood, considered in themselves and in relation to their existence within human knowing faculties, appetites, and in relationship to God. Online only.

PHS 761 The Good, the Bad, the Beautiful & the Ugly This course is a study of the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas about good and its opposite, evil, and the beautiful and it opposite, the ugly, in relationship to unity and multiplicity, being and non-being, and truth and error, and different kinds of good and evil, beauty and ugliness, considered in themselves and in relation to their existence within human knowing faculties, appetites, and in relationship to God. Online only.

PHS 781 Thomistic Personalism: Knowledge & Love This course focuses on the creative growth of Thomism known as Thomistic personalism. It provides the general landscape of Thomistic personalism by exploring a selected set of topics, namely cognition, freedom, love, society, dignity, culture and religion. In discussing them, the student is assisted by a broad range of outstanding Thomistic personalists including St. Pope John Paul II (Karol Wojtyla). The course is recommended for those who want to gain a better understanding of human life, of their own and of others, from the perspective of Christian philosophy. Online only.

PHS 783 Dante’s Divine Comedy: Thomistic Philosophy in Narrative This course examines Dante’s Divine Comedy, one canto a day for one hundred days with breaks following the Inferno and the Purgatorio. The work is read as a narrativization of the works of St. Thomas Aquinas, a way to experience a successful merger of theology and philosophy. Online only.

PSY 200 Psychology This course studies the mind, will, soul, behavior, character of the human person and the relation of the person to others. In doing so, it examines areas of cognitive and behavioral approaches, emotion, development, psychoanalytic and humanistic theories, personality and motivation. Assessment and cultural diversity are studied in each area. Online and on campus.

PSY 271 The Collapse & Restoration of the Family This course explores the dissolution of the nuclear family and its current renovation. The world wars, existentialist movements and the sexual revolution will inform us about the weakening of the father, the assumption of the woman of masculine roles, and the autonomy of children. On campus only.

PSY 281 Psychology of the 1950s This course analyzes the experience and effects of living in the 1950s through the media, religion, novels, poetry, art, and historical documents of that time. On campus only.

SAI 213 Theology of the Icon This course explores the canonical Scriptures and Apocrypha and their influence on Christian iconography. It analyzes various Christian artworks from both the pseudo-canonical and scriptural standpoints, enabling students to understand the Bible as main source of inspiration fundamental to Christian iconography, as well as the Apocrypha and their enduring significance in Christian art both in rhetorical and pictorial forms. We will investigate selected Christian icons and artwork to develop an understanding the theological foundation, interpretation and finality of Christian iconography. Online only.

SAI 214 History of Christian Iconography This course explores Christian iconography since its origins. It surveys major historical developments of Christian iconography, and highlights the styles, themes, materials and process that an iconographer uses to write an icon. It also focuses on learning to read iconographical symbolism in relation to Scripture and liturgy in particular within a Byzantine ichnographical church program, and emphasizes the notion of aesthetics as they relate to the theology of the icon and its meanings. Online only.

SAI 218 Sacred Art Technique (Iconography, Mosaics & Stained Glass) This theoretical course explores several Christian art techniques, namely iconography, mosaics & stained glass. It surveys the different styles, themes and materials the sacred art artist applies in order to create various types of sacred Christian art forms, starting from early Christianity until the present times. Online only.

SAI 222 Christian Arts through the Ages This course explores the historical geography of various Christian art forms from Early Christianity to the present times and highlights its diversity in time and space within different cultural and social contexts. Students will learn to appreciate, identify and interpret the specificities of various monuments and artworks that attest to the rich diversity of Christian sacred artworks from across the world. Online only.

SAI 322 Christian Art and Archaeology This course examines the role of archaeology and its investigation of sacred art and religious sites in relation to the Christian world. Is main focus is the to highlight the nature and function of archaeology as a multidisciplinary discipline and concrete tool that specialists use to attempt to reveal various aspects of the historical and cultural context of the Scriptures and of Christianity, with a focus on sacred arts. Online only.

SAI 323 Christian Architecture Description forthcoming.

SAI 372 Aesthetics in Sacred Art (also listed as PHS 471) This course explores the various elements of Aesthetics in “Sacred Christian Art”, in comparison with secular Christian Arts of religious themes, and in comparison with Art in general. We learn the specifics of Christian theological, doctrinal, theosophical and philosophical thought foundations as they relate to Aesthetics in Sacred Arts and examine their evolution through the ages. Students will recognize and develop an appreciation for the uniqueness of the Aesthetics used in Christian Arts through their multiple facets, intended relation, and effect on the human senses both cognitively, symbolically and spiritually. Online only.

SAI 427 Hagiography from Sacred Art to Liturgy This course explores the life of saints through their representation in figurative sacred artwork. It explains the relation between iconographic hagiography in its liturgical and scriptural contexts. Its main purpose is to enable the students to understand, appreciate, study and interpret hagiographic iconography and its meaning and uses in sacred space and time within liturgy. Online only.

SAI 501 Byzantine Iconography Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Byzantine icon through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will write a complete Icon to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 502 Greek Iconography Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Greek icons through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will write a complete Icon to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 503 Russian Iconography Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Russian icons through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will write a complete Icon to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 504 Mosaics Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Mosaics through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete mosaic artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 505 Stained Glass Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of stained glass through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete stained glass artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 506 Calligraphy (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of calligraphy through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete calligraphy artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 507 Illumination Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of illuminations through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete illumination artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 508 Mural Painting Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of small portable mural paintings through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete small portable mural artwork to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 509 Sculpture 101, Clay Modeling & Casting Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and creation of Sculpture through practice, theory and theological discussion. Each participant will create a complete Clay figure and cast the artwork with plaster to take home at the end of this one-week workshop. No artistic skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT.

SAI 510 Sacred Music Workshop (1 credit) This workshop will guide and introduce students to the meaning and use of the sacred music in our daily life through practice, theory and theological discussion. No musical skills needed to attend this workshop. Onsite at Enders Island, Mystic, CT

SAS 101 Intro to Scripture This course treats in detail the Biblical inspiration, canonicity, texts, versions, hermeneutics, literary genre, and the ongoing sanctifying activity of the Holy Spirit through the use of the Holy Scripture both by individuals and by the Church officially. Online and on campus.

SAS 211 The Old Testament This course surveys the principal books of the Old Testament, following the history of Israel as an outline including literary and cultural forms essential to an understanding of ancient Hebrew writings. On campus only.

SAS 251 The New Testament This course surveys all the principal works of the New Testament, emphasizing the historical, literary, and theological background necessary for a fruitful reading of the texts. Special emphasis is placed on the problem of historicity and on Pauline and Johannine literature. On campus only.

SAS 451 Synoptic Gospels This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background. Online and On campus.

SAS 461 Gospel of John This course examines the Fourth Gospel. Topics include the unique character of the Gospel of John in relation to the Synoptics, theories of authorship, specifics of Johannine spirituality as highlighted by patristic commentators and in liturgy. Online only.

SAS 471 Letters of St. Paul This course studies the major themes of the Pauline corpus with consideration of the form of writing known as the epistles. Concentration is on I Thessalonians, I Corinthians, Galatians, and Romans. Online and on campus.

SAS 600 The Integration of Scripture in Salvation History This course integrates the various parts of Scripture studied in separate courses into a unified view of the whole history of salvation. Particular attention will be given to the covenants God has made with man as the unifying theme of Holy Scripture. On campus only.

SAS 601 Introduction to Scripture This course is an introduction to Sacred Scripture and therefore to theology and the history of salvation. Special attention is given to select biblical texts that have been foundational in western theological tradition with a special emphasis on the various methods of scriptural interpretation will also be covered. Online only.

SAS 602 Methods of Theology and Scripture Analysis The course examines concepts and criteria used in Biblical and Theological Sciences: word, Revelation, transmission, Truth in Scripture, Canonicity, Authenticity, Integrity, Magisterium, Tradition, etc., and acquaints the students with the Books of the Bible per se: languages; traditions. Online only.

SAS 611 Biblical Inspiration, Inerrancy, and Interpretation Description TBA. On campus only.

SAS 621 Prophetic Literature This course examines the phenomenon of prophecy in Israel, and surveys early “non-writing” prophets, and classical prophets in their historical contexts to uncover their theological message and understand the development of prophecy into eschatology and apocalypse. Online and on campus.

SAS 630 Psalms This course treats the contemporaneous character of the Psalms which have been the prayers of the centuries. On campus only.

SAS 631 Wisdom Literature This course views sapiential literature (Job, Proverbs, Sirach, Qohelet, Psalms and Song of Songs) as an expression of Israel’s spirituality both at the time of its writing and today. Online and on campus.

SAS 639 The Pentateuch This course will critically examine the five books of Moses as the foundation of Holy Scripture. Issues of authorship, date, and historical context will be examined in the light of magisterial pronouncements and current scholarship. On campus only.

SAS 641 Apocalyptic Literature This course focuses on the eschatological dimension of biblical revelation, exemplified in the book of Revelation. Apocalyptic literature is found in both the Old and New Testaments. Biblical and extrabiblical apocalyptic literature are compared. Online and on campus. SAS 642 The Historical Books This course traces the history of Israel through the historical books of the Old Testament (Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1&2 Samuel, 1&2Kings, 1&2Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Tobit, Judith, Esther, and 1&2 Maccabees) viewed as the outworking the divine covenants through human fallibility. On campus only.

SAS 651 Synoptic Gospels This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background. Online only.

SAS 652 Synoptic Gospels This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background. Onsite in Avila, Spain.

SAS 657 Luke & the Acts of the Apostles This course studies the Gospel of Luke taking into consideration the historical, religious, and cultural background of this rich and inspirational gospel along with the structure, purpose, authorship, historical background and theological themes of the Acts of the Apostles; its relation to the Gospel of Luke; and an exegesis of selected passages. On campus only.

SAS 661 Gospel of John This course studies the Gospel of John considering the historical, religious, and cultural background of this gospel and major themes such as covenant, Kingdom of God, grace, redemption, wisdom, prophecy, creation, Trinity, faith, angels, resurrection and priesthood. Online only.

SAS 671 Letters of St. Paul This course studies the composition, structure, purpose, historical background and theological themes of the Pauline letters with an exegesis of selected passages. Online and on campus. SAS 681 Hebrews This course teaches the Theology of the Priesthood in the Letter to the Hebrews. The first two modules illuminate the Sitz im Leben, the third is a meditation via lectio divina, and the fourth relates the Priesthood of Jesus Christ to the Priesthood in the Catholic Church. Online only.

SAS 681 Hebrews This course teaches the Theology of the Priesthood in the Letter to the Hebrews. The first two modules illuminate the Sitz im Leben, the third is a meditation via lectio divina, and the fourth relates the Priesthood of Jesus Christ to the Priesthood in the Catholic Church. Online only.

SAS 701 Biblical Exegesis, Kerygma, & Didache This course will cover the basic principles of drawing the meaning out of the biblical text for the purpose of proclamation (preaching) and instruction (teaching) in the context of a typical Catholic parish. On campus only.

SAS 711 Scripture as the Agent of Metanoia This course is a practicum on integrating the Scriptures into the devotional life of the priest as a means of ongoing conversion and evangelization. On campus only.

SAS 802 Johannine Writings This course covers the Fourth Gospel, the three Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation. Topics include the unique character of John’s Gospel in relation to the Synoptics and theories of authorship. Specifics of Johannine spirituality highlighted by patristic authors is also discussed. On campus only.

SCM 101 Math in the Liberal Arts By using game theory and its relation with other mathematical topics including probability, statistics, algebra, and geometry, this course will allow the student to develop a creative mind that possesses critical, qualitative and quantitative thinking skills. Students will explore mathematics through games, which will allow them to learn key concepts organically without trepidation. Online and on campus.

SCM 151 College Algebra This course covers equations and inequalities in one variable; linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of linear equations in two variables. It includes polynomial functions and their zeroes, trigonometric functions and Analytic trigonometry. On campus only.

SCM 161 Earth Science This course covers the natural sciences including geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Using a systems approach, the connection between the Earth sciences will be emphasized. Current topics including climate change, carbon taxing will be discussed. On campus only.

SCM 171 Biology This course is an introduction to the biological sciences directed toward non-science majors. Topics include elements of biochemistry, cell structure and function, reproduction, genetics, evolutionary theory, plant and animal diversity, elements of physiology, and a brief examination of ecology. Online only.

SCM 201 Physics This course will introduce students to the concepts, principles and fundamentals of the physical science, including the study of motion, Newton’s law of motion, the conservation of energy and momentum, waves, basic concepts of fluids, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. It includes a 1-hour lab for a total of 4 credits. Online and on campus.

SCM 220 Chemistry This course introduces students the fundamentals of chemistry. Students will describe the concept of chemical change, compute equations that represent that change, and use knowledge of quantities to understand the behavior of matter. It includes a 1-hour lab for a total of 4 credits. Online only.

SOC 103 Sociology This course surveys the methods of sociology and their application to contemporary society. Online and on campus.

SOC 209 Emergence and Development of the Social Sciences This course examines the development of the social sciences, looking first to the enlightenment and then to the 19th and 20th centuries, and develops a better understanding of both the benefits and limits of sociology, psychology and anthropology. On campus only.

SOC 253 Political Science The course surveys ideas in the study of government and politics, examines the perennial questions in political life (Who should rule? and Is it good to have power? and Do truth and right change in the course of history?), and explores the various fields of political science. Online and on campus.

SOC 275 Economics This course will introduce students to the basic principles of macroeconomics and microeconomics from a Catholic perspective while paying close attention to the following Catholic principles: human dignity, solidarity, subsidiarity, and the common good. The economic theories and Catholic principles that will be presented will be complemented by demonstrating their practical applications. Online and on campus.

SOC 318 Advent of Religious Broadcasting This course explores the triumphs and pitfalls of broadcast media when they are used to carry the message of the Gospel, along with the development of technology and the interplay between culture and evangelization. Online and on campus.

SOC 375 American Government This course examines the philosophical, institutional, and behavioral elements of the political system of the United States with emphasis on Constitutional , and studies the tension between obligation to “Caesar” (political citizenship) and obligation to God (religious conscience). On campus only.

SPA 101 Spanish I (formerly LA 201 Spanish I and PS 677 Pastoral Spanish I)  This course is a basic introduction to Spanish pronunciation, grammar, conversation and reading. Residential only.

SPA 102 Spanish II (formerly LA 202 Spanish II and PS 678 Pastoral Spanish II)  Continues SPA 101. Residential only.

SPA 201 Spanish III (formerly PS 679A Pastoral Spanish III) Spanish speech and writing. Residential only.


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