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Online Learning

Course Number: STP 650
Course Title: Business Ethics
Term: Fall 2014

Professor

Dr. Maciej Bazela

mbazela@holyapostles.edu

Skype: maciej.bazela

1. Course Description

The course offers a timely and comprehensive study of the most important ethical issues that arise in business management. 

The main purpose of the course is to equip students with knowledge, insight and tools which will help them recognize, analyze and address business ethics issues at the personal, organizational, and social levels. The course puts emphasize on the development of critical thinking and decision-making skills. 

The course aims to raise students’ awareness about moral implications of business decisions. It underlines the importance of ethical leadership, personal integrity and social responsibility as hallmarks of a successful and fulfilling business career.

The course adopts a rational, critical, and pragmatic approach which brings together ethics, business management, economics, and Social Teaching of the Church. 

Topics include introduction to philosophical ethics, ethical decision making process, the role of ethical leadership and corporate culture, corporate social responsibility, environmental sustainability, globalization, corporate complicity in human rights violations, ethical issue in the workplace, ethics of new technologies, ethics of marketing, corporate governance, accounting and finance.

The course uses real life business cases, business readings, discussion points, and interviews with CEOs.  

2. Envisioned Learning Outcomes

  • Students will gain a sound understanding of business ethics principles, concepts and decision-making tools.
  • Students will become aware of personal integrity, social responsibility and environmental sustainability as three pillars of successful business.
  • Students will gain competence in recognizing and addressing ethical dilemmas in the business environment.
  • Students will gain confidence in using decision-making tools and forming informed judgment when faced with ethical challenges
  • Students will improve their analytical and reasoning skills by delivering concise, critical and convincing written assignments. 

3. Course Schedule

Week 1: What is business ethics?

Objectives:

  • Explain why ethics is important in the business environment.
  • Explain the nature of business ethics as an academic discipline.
  • Distinguish the ethics of personal integrity from the ethics of social responsibility.
  • Distinguish ethical norms and values from other business-related norms and values.
  • Distinguish legal responsibilities from ethical responsibilities.
  • Explain why ethical responsibilities go beyond legal compliance.
  • Describe ethical decision making as a form of practical reasoning.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 1, Ethics and business, p.1-29
  • Hartman et al., ‘The MBA Oath’, p.40
  • Hartman et al., ‘The oath demands commitment to bad corporate governance’, p.40-41
  • Hartman et al., ‘The MBA Oath helps remind graduates of their ethical obligations’, p.42-44

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
    1. The MBA Oath: Is the MBA oath (a) a right step towards making business more ethical, (b) a lofty expression of moral idealism which will have little effect in practice, (c) a dangerous idea which threatens wealth creation and economic development?

Week 2: Business & Ethics: common approaches to ethical thinking in business

Objectives:

  • Present common approaches to ethical thinking such as conventional morality, ethical pluralism and ethical relativism.
  • Differentiate between subjective and objective ethics
  • Explain the relation between ethics and religion
  • Outline the nexus between ethics and law

Readings:

  • Professor’s lecture
  • Hartman at al., ‘The Parable of the Sadhu’, p.67-73  

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. ‘When in Rome, do as the Romans do’. Should companies follow this rule of thumb in international business?       
  2. Good people do not need laws to tell them to act justly, while bad people will find a way around the laws’, Plato. Do you agree? Why yes or why not?
  3. ‘The Parable of the Sadhu’. What ethical lessons have you drawn from this story?

 

Week 3: Ethical decision making process

Objectives:

  • Describe a process for ethically responsible decision making.
  • Apply this model to ethical decision points.
  • Explain the reasons why “good” people might engage in unethical behavior.
  • Explore the impact of managerial roles on the nature of our decision making.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al.: Chapter 2, Ethical decision making, p.45-67
  • Hartman et al., ’When good people do bad things at work’, p. 97-100 

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. Write a brief account of any unethical or ethically questionable experience you have witnessed in a work or an    academic context. Consider how the organization allowed or encouraged such behavior and what might have been done to prevent it.  
  2. Why good people do bad things at work?
  3. ‘Ethical Oil: Choose Your Poison’: Imagine that you stop at the ‘TRANSPAREX’ gas station to put some fuel into your car. Supposing that going to another gas station is not an option, which pump would you choose and why?

Pump 1:  Fuel from a country where oil is extracted with little respect for the enviroment. Price: $1.20/gallon.

Pump 2: Fuel from a country where oil extraction is controlled by a dictatorial regime with a proven record of human rights abuses. Price: $1.10/gallon.

Pump 3: Fuel from a country where oil extraction follows the highest environmental and ethics standards. Price: $1.60/gallon.

Pump 4: ‘Transparex Brand’. No additional info. Price $1.40

Week 4: Business ethics. Which ethics? (Part 1)

Objectives:

  • Define ethics as a science
  • Distinguish between ethics and morality
  • Study the components of the moral act
  • Identify the first-order and second-order ethical principles and their origins
  • Learn about major ethical theories

Readings:

  • Professor’s lecture
  • Hartman et al., Chapter 3, Philosophical ethics and business, p. 101-131
  • Hartman et al., ‘It seems right in theory but does it work in practice?’, p. 140-146

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. How would you try to convince a business leader that ethical relativism is false?
  2. In the reading ‘It seems right in theory but does it work in practice?’ Norman Bowie makes a couple of arguments in favour of business ethics, in particular Kantian business ethics. One of the main arguments is that ‘business decisions should not be self-defeating’. What does it mean? 
  3. What are the ‘five ways of thinking ethically’ presented in the indicated video for this class? What are the strengths and weaknesses of each of the 5 ways?

Week 5: Business ethics. Which ethics (Part 2)

Objectives:

  • Explain the ethical framework of utilitarianism.
  • Describe how utilitarian thinking underlies economic and business decision making.
  • Explain how the free market is thought to serve the utilitarian goal of maximizing the overall good.
  • Explain some challenges to utilitarian decision making.
  • Explain principle-based, or rights-based framework of ethics.
  • Explain the concept of human rights and how they are relevant to business.
  • Distinguish moral rights from legal rights.
  • Explain several challenges to principle-based ethics.
  • Describe and explain virtue-based framework for thinking about ethical character.

Readings:

  • Professor’s lecture
  • Hartman et al., Chapter 3, Philosophical ethics and business, p. 101-131
  • Hartman et al., ‘The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights’, p. 132-137
  • The Trolley Problem

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. Executive compensation: needed incentives, justly deserved or just distatestful?
  2. The trolley problem: (1) would you divert the trolley causing death of one person to save other persons on the tracks? (2) Would you push a passive bystander onto the tracks to save a group of workers who do not see the train coming?
  3. Imagine you are the head of police department in your city. You receive a tip that that a chemical bomb has been planted somewhere in the city and will explode in 24 hours. A leader of a terrorist cell that is under arrest confesses that his group is behind the plot. Would you consider using torture, as the last resort, to extract information from the leader about the location of the bomb?
  4. Suppose you chair the investment committee in the town hall in your city. The investment budget is tight. You can approve only two of the following four projects. Which projects would you vote for and why?

Project 1: Install a guardrail on a dangerous stretch of road on the outskirts of the city since several fatal accidents have already occurred there.

Project 2:  Build a shopping centre which will create hundreds of jobs and push up consumption

Project 3: Renew the sports center which local athletes and various sports teams badly need if they want to compete on the national and international levels.

Project 4:  Built a state-of-the art multifunctional arts & science center which is vital to improve the level of local education and cultural life.

  1. What is the ‘Protect-Respect-Remedy’ framework? How does it apply to business?

Week 6: Global issues in business ethics

Objectives:

  • Explore what the age of globality is and how it affects international business
  • Identify major ethical, social and environmental challenges for global business
  • Discuss the future of capitalism
  • Learn how to assess corporate complicity in human rights violations

Readings:

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
    1. The study ‘Managing the global enterprise in today’s multi polar world’ presents some best in class practices and characteristics of global companies. What makes Bunge and Siemens leading international businesses?
    2. What is Zakaria’s vision of capitalism after the 2007-2009 downfall? Do you agree with him?

Week 7: Corporate social responsibility

Objectives:

  • Define corporate social responsibility.
  • Describe and evaluate the economic model of corporate social responsibility.
  • Distinguish key components of the term responsibility.
  • Describe and evaluate the philanthropic model of corporate social responsibility.
  • Describe and evaluate the social web model of corporate social responsibility.
  • Describe and evaluate the integrative model of corporate social responsibility.
  • Explain the role of reputation management as motivation behind CSR.
  • Evaluate the claims that CSR is “good” for business.                       

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 5, Corporate social responsibility, p.211-239
  • Hartman et al., ‘Rethinking the social responsibility of business’, p. 239-247

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. Peter Braeck-Letmathe, Nestle’s CEO, once said that ‘companies shouldn’t feel obliged to give back to communities because they haven’t taken anything away’? Do you agree? Why yes, why not?
  2. Imagine you are an investment analyst. Among many things, you participate in putting together ethical funds for ethically conscious investors. Would you include Wal-Mart in an ethical investment fund?
  3. What makes Whole Foods a leader of corporate social responsibility?

Week 8: Environmental sustainability

Objectives:

  • Explain how environmental challenges can create business opportunities.
  • Describe a range of values that play a role in environmental decision making.
  • Explain the difference between market-based and regulatory-based environmental policies.
  • Describe business’ environmental responsibilities that flow from each approach.
  • Identify the inadequacies of sole reliance on a market-based approach.
  • Identify the inadequacies of regulatory-based environmental policies.
  • Define and describe sustainable development and sustainable business.
  • Highlight the business opportunities associated with a move toward sustainability.
  • Describe the sustainable principles of eco-efficiency, biomimicry, and service.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 9, Business and environmental sustainability, p.475-498
  • Hartman et al., ‘The next industrial revolution’, p.499-505

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. Why is eco-effectiveness better than eco-efficiency?
  2. Post a short summary of one of the redesign projects carried out by McDonough + Partners.  Explain what you like the most about the project.
  3. Is environmental sustainability compatible with ever-rising consumer aspirations, especially among emerging economies, and relentless economic growth of the global economy?

Week 9: Corporation and employees: duties, responsibilities and rights

Objectives:

  • Discuss the two distinct perspectives on the ethics of workplace relationships.
  • Explain the concept of due process in the workplace.
  • Define “employment at will” (EAW) and its ethical rationale.
  • Describe the costs of an EAW environment.
  • Explain how due process relates to performance appraisals.
  • Discuss whether it is possible to downsize in an ethical manner.
  • Explain the difference between intrinsic and instrumental value in terms of health and safety.
  • Describe the “acceptable risk” approach to health and safety in the workplace.
  • Describe the nature of an employer’s responsibility with regard to employee health and safety and why the market is not the most effective arbiter of this responsibility.
  • Explain the basic arguments for and against regulation of the global labor environment.
  • Describe the argument for a market-based resolution to workplace discrimination.
  • Define diversity as it applies to the workplace.
  • Explain the benefits and challenges of diversity for the workplace.
  • Define affirmative action and explain the three ways in which affirmative action may be legally permissible.
  • Articulate the basic guidelines for affirmative action programs.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 6, Ethical decision making: employer responsibilities and employee rights, p.261-310
  • Hartman et al., ‘Sweatshops, choice and exploitation’, p. 315-327

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. Sweatshops may seem morally legitimate because (i) they allow emerging economies grow more rapidly, and (ii) workers consent to sweatshops conditions voluntarily. Do you agree?
  2. As a manager, what steps might you take to prevent bullying and harassment at your workplace?
  3. Is there an ‘ethical’ way of conducting mass layoffs?
  4. Is child labour ethical?
  5. The Ford Pinto case illustrates that companies sometimes measure human life in financial terms. How much do you think a human life is worth? How would you account for the intrinsic and the instrumental value of the human life?

Week 10: The information age: ethics of new technologies

Objectives:

  • Explain and distinguish the two definitions of privacy.
  • Describe the ethical sources of privacy as a fundamental value.
  • Identify the three legal sources of privacy protection.
  • Discuss the concept of a “reasonable expectation of privacy”
  • Discuss recent development in connection with employee monitoring.
  • Explain the risks involved in a failure to understand the implications of technology and its use.
  • Identify additional ethical challenges posed by technology use.
  • Articulate the manner in which employee monitoring works.
  • Enumerate the reasons employers choose to monitor employees’ work.
  • Discuss the ethics of monitoring as it applies to drug testing.
  • Discuss the ethics of monitoring as it applies to polygraphs, genetic testing, and other forms of surveillance.
  • Explain why monitoring might also pose some costs for the employer and for the employee.
  • Discuss the elements of a monitoring program that might balance the interests of the employee and the employer.
  • Explain the interests of an employer in regulating an employee’s activities outside of work.
  • Discuss the implications of September 11, 2001, on privacy rights.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 7, Ethical decision making: technology and privacy in the workplace, p. 335-366
  • Hartman et al., ‘The ethical use of technology in business’, p. 384-389
  • Hartman et al., ‘Hiring in a social media age’, p. 390-391

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. You are responsible for drafting a policy on dating at work in your organization. In which direction will you tilt? If you opt for a prohibition, how do you plan to enforce it? Are you willing to hire someone who is dating a current employee? Must they stop dating?  
  2. Does ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’ make sense in the era of social networking, Google search, and ubiquitous security systems such as CCTV cameras?
  3. Are robot soldier going to make war more ethical?

Week 11: Marketing and advertising

Objectives:

  • Apply an ethical framework to marketing issues.
  • Describe the three key concerns of ethical analysis of marketing issues.
  • Describe three interpretations of responsibility and apply them to the topic of product safety.
  • Explain contractual standards for establishing business’ responsibilities for safe products.
  • Articulate the tort standards for establishing business’ responsibilities for safe products.
  • Analyze the ethical arguments for and against strict product liability.
  • Discuss how to evaluate both ethical and unethical means by which to influence people through advertising.
  • Explain the ethical justification for advertising.
  • Trace debates about advertising’s influence on consumer autonomy.
  • Distinguish ethical from unethical target marketing, using marketing to vulnerable populations as an example.
  • Discuss business’ responsibilities for the activities of its supply chain.
  • Explain how marketing can contribute toward a more sustainable business model.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 8, Ethics and marketing, p. 401-435
  • Hartman et al., ‘Fortune at the bottom of the pyramid’, p. 458-471

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. Who should pay for asbestos caused illnesses and deaths?
  2. How do you create purchasing power at the bottom of the social pyramid?
  3. Do fast-food chains and soda producers act irresponsibly merchandising products associated with obesity, diabetes and other health problems? What ethical measures if any would you suggest to make fast-food business more responsible?
  4. In 2012 an Australian court set a precedence forcing cigarette manufacturers to sell cigarettes in plain, logo-free packets adorned with gruesome images of mouth cancer and other smoking-related illnesses.  Do you think cigarette manufacturing is an ethically permissible business? What ethical regulations, if any, would you place on production and marketing of cigarettes?

Week 12: Corporate governance, accounting, finance

Objectives:

  • Explain the role of accountants and other professionals as “gatekeepers”.
  • Describe how conflicts of interest can arise for business professionals.
  • Outline the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
  • Describe the COSO framework.
  • Define the “control environment” and the means by which ethics and culture can impact that environment.
  • Discuss the legal obligations of a member of a board of directors.
  • Explain the ethical obligations of a member of a board of directors.
  • Highlight conflicts of interest in financial markets and discuss the ways in which they may be alleviated.
  • Describe conflicts of interest in governance created by excessive executive compensation.
  • Define insider trading and evaluate its potential for unethical behaviour.

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 10, Ethical decision-making: corporate governance, accounting and finance, p. 523-556
  • Hartman et al., ‘How much compensation can CEOs permissibly accept?’, p. 563-571

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. AIG compensation package: justly deserved or just distasteful?
  2. Reflecting upon the LIBOR scandal and Enron’s case, can you think of any new initiative, structure, or practice that might improve corporate governance? In particular, what would you do to eradicate conflicts of interests and the agency problem?  
  3. Is more regulation the answer to corporate governance failures?

Week 13: Corporate culture and ethical leadership

Objectives:

  • Define corporate culture.
  • Explain how corporate culture impacts ethical decision making.
  • Discuss the differences between a compliance-based culture and a values-based culture.
  • Discuss the role of corporate leadership in establishing the culture.
  • Explain the difference between effective leaders and ethical leaders.
  • Discuss the role of mission statements and codes in creating an ethical corporate culture.
  • Explain how various reporting mechanisms such as ethics hotlines and ombudsmen can help integrate ethics within a firm.
  • Discuss the role of assessing, monitoring, and auditing the culture and ethics program.
  • Explain how culture can be enforced via governmental regulation. 

Readings:

  • Hartman et al., Chapter 4, The Corporate culture – impact and implications, p. 147-186
  • Hartman et al., ‘Greg Smith, Goldman Sachs, and the importance of corporate culture’, p. 206-210

Media:

Assignments:

  • Post discussion responses to the indicated prompts:
  1. What does it mean to be leader? What type of leader would you like to be? Who do you consider a leader?
  2. Companies usually care much more about compliance than corporate culture. How would you convince a hesitant CEO about the importance of corporate culture?
  3. Imagine you are the CEO of Goldman Sachs. One morning you walk into your office and find on your desk Greg Smith’s resignation letter and a note from Smith’s supervisor who is asking for help. What do you do?

Week 14: Self-study week

Objectives:

  • Take course quizzes
  • Make sure you have posted the required amount of discussion prompts and peer answers

Readings:

  • No readings for this week

Media:

  • No media for this week

Assignments:

  • Course Quizzes

Week 15: Business ethics and Social Doctrine of the Church

Objectives:

  • See what the Social Doctrine of the Church says about economic ethics.
  • Define the true meaning and value of economic development
  • Learn about the most fundamental moral principles of socio-economic life
  • Discuss ethics of biotechnology
  • Discover the novelty of BXVI’s Encyclical Letter Caritas in Veritate

Readings:

Media:

Assignments:

  • Read the indicated materials and watch the indicated media

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Discussion postings – 30%

One or more discussion forums will be available each week of the course. Students will respond substantively to the forums for a total of 10 postings. The postings should be 200-250 words each (250 words equals 1 double-spaced page font size 12 points) and should address with some depth of thought the discussion prompt based on the assigned readings and/or media.

Peer Responses – 20%

Students will respond (at least half a page long) to 10 reflections made by your colleagues on 10 separate weekly discussion forums. The idea is to get to know one another through interaction and to exercise prudential decision making skills through critical, but respectful dialogue. 

Quizzes – 50%

Students will take 4 quizzes which will test their understanding of key concepts and ideas presented in the course. The quizzes will consist of several multiple-choice questions with one correct answer only. The quizzes will test your knowledge and comprehension of the KEY TERMS that are highlighted in the course manual in BLUE. Each chapter has its own set of KEY TERMS that are embedded in the text and are listed at the end of each chapter in the section KEY TERMS. Those terms are also listed and defined in the GLOSSARY at the end of the manual.

Quiz 1:

- covers Chapters 1, 2 and 3 of Hartman et al. 

- consists of 15 multiple choice questions

- total score: 15 points

Quiz 2:

- covers Chapters 5 and 9 of Hartman et al.

- consists of 10 multiple choice questions

- total score: 10 points

Quiz 3:

- covers Chapters 6, 7, and 8 of Hartman et al.

- consists of 15 multiple choice questions

- total score: 15 points

Quiz 4:

- covers Chapters 10 and 4 of Hartman et al.

- consists of 10 multiple choice questions

- total score: 10 points

5. REQUIRED READINGS:

  • Hartman, L.P. – DesJardins, J. – MacDonald, Ch., Business ethics. Decision making for personal integrity and social responsibility, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2014, ISBN-10 0-07-802945-7; ISBN-13 978-0-07-802945-5.
  •  (The book is available for digital rental at www.coursesmart.com. You can also purchase a hard copy of the manual or rent it at www.amazon.com
  • Benedict XVI, The encyclical letter Caritas in Veritate, The Vatican Press, 2009.
  • Various articles and reports that you will find on Populi.

6. ADDITIONAL READINGS:

  • A complete list of readings for this course is available on Populi under the Info tag.  

7. SUGGESTED RESOURCES:

8. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 D 60-69; F 59 and below

100 points = 30 pts (10 Discussion Posting x 3 pts. each) + 20 pts (10 Peer Responses x 2 pts. each) + 15pts (Quiz 1) + 10pts (Quiz 2) + 15pts (Quiz 3) + 10pts (Quiz 4)

Grading Rubric for the Discussion Board (DB) Postings and Peer Responses (PR)

0 pts. – DB Posting;

0 pts. – PR Posting

1 pt. – DB Posting;

0 pts – PR Response

1.5 pts. – DB Posting;

0.5 pts – PR Response

2.0 pts. – DB Posting;

1.0 pts – PR Response

2.5 – DB Posting;

1.5 pts. – PR Response

3.0 pts. – DB Posting;

2.0 pts. – PR Response

 

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as they relate to the topic.

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connections to other concepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

 

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

 

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic.

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering; simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

 

COMMUNITY INTERACTION

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting.

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

 

9. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

10. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

11. ATTENDANCE POLICY & TIME COMMITMENT

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

12. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

13. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, on-campus students must complete the Incomplete Request Form from the website. Distance Learning students may also download it from the Shared Folder of the Files tab in Populi and have it signed by the instructor.*

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) administratively turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw** from the course.

* Distance learning students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favour of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student. On campus instructors will submit the incomplete form to the registrar at the time they submit student grades. Distance Learning instructors will submit the incomplete form to the Distance Learning Office upon finalizing their grades in the learning management system.

**A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

14. OFFICE HOURS

Since this course is offered entirely in a technology-mediated forum, office hours will be held on-demand in the online environment via Skype or Chat on Populi. Students are asked to request an appointment at least 48 hours ahead of time. Students are encouraged to contact the instructor by email at any time.

15. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Dr. Maciej Bazela holds a Doctorate in Philosophy, a Master in Bioethics, and a Licentiate in Philosophy from the Pontifical University Regina Apostolorum (Italy). He obtained also the Essential Pathways Certificate from the Responsible Investment Academy (Australia) and Good Clinical Practice Certificate from Infonetica Ltd (UK). He worked in research, consulting and teaching environments in Spain, UK, Italy, USA and Mexico.  Most importantly, he used to be an Analyst for Socially Responsible Investment. He taught business ethics at the Cameron School of Business at the University of Saint Thomas in Houston.  He runs an independent consulting boutique Applied Ethics Solutions: www.appliedethicssolutions.com  and collaborates with the Holy Apostle College & Seminary. At present, he is based in Mexico City where he is a full time professor at IPADE Business School.

(860) 632-3010