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Course Number: STD 521
Course Title: Scripture and Tradition in the Church
Term: Summer 2014

Profressor Patrick Madrid

pmadrid@holyapostles.edu 740-334-4394

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

As a peritus at the Second Vatican Council, French theologian Yves Congar, O.P. exerted a profound influence on the Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation, Dei Verbum. Congar’s widely lauded contribution to Dei Verbum was the culmination of his decades of sustained scholarship, deeply exploring Sacred Tradition and its relationship to Scripture in the Church. His adroit and penetrating research into the testimony of the Fathers and medieval doctors yielded a remarkable abundance of rich, compelling data that enabled him to formulate what he saw as a viable solution to the twin “problems” of sola Scriptura and Tradition — the former is problematic for Catholics, while the latter is problematic for Protestants. This course will explore the biblical and historical dimensions of Congar’s understanding of the concept of the material sufficiency of Scripture and its relationship to Sacred Tradition, as well as his critique of the Protestant principle of sola Scriptura and its inherent assertion that Scripture is formally, not just materially, sufficient. This course can be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Students will gain a thorough understanding of Catholic doctrine concerning the nature and scope of Divine Revelation in Sacred Scripture and Apostolic Tradition and their integral relationship with each other in the Church, especially as these teachings are explicated in the Second Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitutions on Divine Revelation (Dei Verbum) and the Church (Lumen Gentium).
  • Students will gain a thorough understanding of the biblical and historical challenges against Catholic teaching raised by Luther and Calvin via the Reformation principle of sola Scriptura.
  • Students will gain a clear understanding of the important theological contributions in the Church’s theology of revelation made by Joseph Ratzinger and Avery Dulles, S.J., with particular attention given to the scholarship of Yves Congar, OP, especially his critique of the Protestant Reformation’s principle of sola Scriptura and his ecumenical “solution” to the impasse between Catholics and Protestants resulting from two opposing eccesiologies and differing models of the authority of the Bible.
  • Students will demonstrate a mastery of the general principles and nomenclature pertaining to Catholic and Protestant understandings of divine revelation, including theories of scriptural sufficiency, the nature, purpose and function of Apostolic tradition, human tradition, the canon, biblical perspicuity, the role of the Magisterium, patristic and medieval testimony, and the pertinent teachings of Saint Thomas Aquinas and John Henry Newman.

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: What Is Divine Revelation?

Lecture: Audio by Prof. Madrid — Overview of Divine Revelation

Readings

Assignments

  • Write 300-word synopsis of Dei Verbum focused on explaining the nature of Divine Revelation and in what modes it is primarily conveyed by God to human beings.

Week 2: The Church as the “Pillar and Bulwark of the Truth”

Lectures

Audio by Prof. Madrid — the role of the Church in safeguarding and faithfully transmitting Divine Revelation

Readings

Assignments

  • Write 300-word synopsis of required-reading sections of Lumen Gentium explaining the role of the Catholic Church in safeguarding and faithfully transmitting Divine Revelation.

Week 3: Sacred Scripture

Lectures: Audio by Prof. Madrid — Overview of Scripture

Readings

  • God’s Word, pp. 41-87
  • Pope Leo XIII on the Study of Sacred Scripture Providentissimus Deus (all)
  • 2 Timothy 3:14-17

Assignments

  • Write a 300-word synopsis on the Catholic Church’s teaching on the importance and role of Sacred Scripture; discuss the concepts of “inspiration” and “inerrancy.”

Week 4: Tradition and traditions

Lectures

Audio by Prof. Madrid — Tradition and traditions

Readings

  • The Meaning of Tradition, pp. 9-128
  • Matt. 15:1-14; Mark 7:1-13; 1 Cor. 11:2, 23-32; 1 Thess. 2:13; 2 Thess. 2:15; 2 Tim. 1:13, 2:1-2;

Assignments

  • Write 300-word synopsis of the nature and scope of Sacred Tradition (in all its forms) and explain how to distinguish it from mere human traditions.

Week 5: The Problem of Sola Scriptura

Lecture: “What Still Divides Us?” Catholic/Protestant Debate on Sola Scriptura

  • CD1
  • CD2
  • CD3
  • CD4

Readings

  • Scripture and Tradition in the Church, chapters 1-4

Assignments

  • Write 500-word synopsis of the “What Still Divides Us?” debate, identifying key arguments used on both sides and offering suggestions on what additional points a Catholic could make in this discussion.

Week 6: Sacred Scripture’s Relationship with the Magisterium

Lectures: Audio by Prof. Madrid — Sacred Scripture’s Relationship with the Magisterium

Readings

  • Scripture and Tradition in the Church, chapters 5-6
  • Magisterium, pp. 47-81

Assignments

  • Write 300-word synopsis of the readings, discussing the role of the Magisterium in the authentic interpretation of Scripture, as well the nature and scope (in all its forms) of the charism of infallibility.

Week 7: Does the Bible Teach Sola Scriptura?

Lectures:

  • “Does the Bible Teach Sola Scriptura?” Debate MP3 (NOTE: ZIP file, which converts to two 90-minute MP3 tracks, part 1 & part 2).

Readings

Assignments

  • Write 300-word synopsis of the “Does the Bible Teach Sola Scriptura?” debate, focusing on how the Protestant debater defended this Reformation principle and discuss the Catholic critique, adding any additional points you might have made in that debate, in light of Congar’s findings on this issue.

Week 8: MID-TERM EXAM

Week 9: The Historical Background of Catholic Teaching on Scripture and Tradition

Readings

  • Scripture and Tradition in the Church, chapters 10-11
  • The Meaning of Tradition, pp. 129-169

Assignments

Write a 300-word synopsis of the patristic and medieval witness to the Church’s tri-partite model of authority, exploring both its subject, content, and monuments.

Week 10: Liturgical Expressions of Tradition

Lectures: Audio by Prof. Madrid — Tradition in the Liturgical Life of the Church

Readings

Assignments

  • Write a 300-word reflection on your own encounters and experience with Sacred Tradition and human traditions in the Mass, the sacraments, and any other dimensions of the Church.

Week 11: Ecumenical Challenges and Opportunities Surrounding Scripture and Tradition

Lectures: Audio by Prof. Madrid — Ecumenical Considerations

Readings

Assignments

Write a 300-word reflection on how your deeper understanding of the Catholic teaching on authority, as well as the Protestant claim of Sola Scriptura, could be used in an ecumenical effort to further Jesus Christ’s (and Yves Congar’s & Vatican II’s) desire that “they may all be one” (John 17).

Week 12: Responding to Church Authority Regarding Divine Revelation

Readings

Week 13: Case Study on Scripture and Tradition: The Bodily Assumption of Mary

Lectures: Audio by Prof. Madrid on the Bodily Assumption of Mary

Readings

Assignments

  • Write a 500-word explanation of the dogma of the Bodily Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, as it was defined by Pope Pius XII, explaining how the pope made use of Scripture and Tradition in the Church as his framework for defining this dogma. Explain the biblical, patristic, and liturgical coherence between these two aspects of the depositum fidei (deposit of faith).

Week 14

Lectures

  • Course Review with Class

Week 15: FINAL EXAM

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • Discussion Postings – 20%
  • 7-Page Research Paper – 20%
  • Midterm Exam – 30%
  • Final Exam – 30%

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

  • Scripture and Tradition in the Church (Patrick Madrid) NOTE: This title is in pre­release. Students of this course should opt for the Verbum e­version, which will work on PCs, Macs, iPhones & iPads, etc., and should cost about $15 once it is released. The book in hardcover will not be available until mid­summer
  • God’s Word (Joseph Ratzinger), Ignatius Press. Kindle edition: $9.99, hardcover on Amazon: $12.46
  • The Meaning of Tradition (Yves Congar, O.P.), Ignatius Press. Paperback on Amazon: $8.89
  • The Magisterium: Teacher and Guardian of the Faith (Avery Dulles, S.J.), Paperback on Amazon: $23.72

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

  • The Holy Bible

7. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

0 pts. – Paper
0 pts. – DB Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
2 pts. – DB Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
4 pts. – DB Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
6 pts. – DB Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
8 pts. – DB Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
10 pts. – DB Posting;

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as they relate to the topic.

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connections to other concepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic.

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering; simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

 

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting.

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

 

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own. At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously. Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

PATRICK MADRID has authored or edited 20 books on Catholic themes, including Why Be Catholic? (Doubleday) Scripture and Tradition in the Church (Sophia Institute), and Envoy for Christ: 25 Years as a Catholic Apologist (Servant Books).

He is president of the Envoy Institute and its Catholic Apologetics Academy (www.CatholicApologeticsAcademy.com), dedicated to teaching Catholics how to explain their beliefs more intelligently, defend them more charitably, and share them more effectively. Prior to launching the Envoy apostolate, Patrick worked at Catholic Answers for eight years (1988 to 1996), where he served as vice president. A veteran of a dozen formal, public debates with Protestant ministers, Mormon leaders, and other non-Catholic spokesmen, Patrick has presented countless seminars on Catholic themes, in English and Spanish, at parishes, universities, and conferences across the U.S. and around the world.

Over the past nearly 30 years, Patrick has published numerous popular articles on Scripture, Church history, patristics, apologetics, and evangelization in various Catholic and Protestant periodicals, and he has contributed scholarly articles on apologetics in The New Catholic Encyclopedia.

He hosts the popular “Right Here, Right Now” radio broadcast, heard Monday through Friday at 4:00 pm ET on approximately 240 AM & FM stations across the country, as well as on Sirius/XM Satellite Radio (channel 130), and globally via shortwave. He is also a frequent guest and guest-host on the “Catholic Answers Live” radio program.

Patrick earned a Bachelor of Science degree in business at the University of Phoenix, as well as a B.Phil. in philosophy and an M.A. in dogmatic theology at the Pontifical College Josephinum (Columbus, OH). He is presently pursuing doctoral studies for a Ph.D. in Church history at Holy Apostles College and Seminary. He has taught theology and apologetics as an adjunct professor at Franciscan University of Steubenville and currently serves as an adjunct professor of theology at Holy Apostles College & Seminary.

Married for 33 years, Patrick and his wife Nancy have been blessed by the Lord with 11 children and 15 grandchildren. They reside in the Diocese of Columbus. His website is www.patrickmadrid.com.

(860) 632-3010