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Online Learning

Course Number: PST 700
Course Title: The Body of Christ & People of God: Christian Life Together in the Presence of Physical & Intellectual Impairment
Term: Fall 2014

Professor: Marc Tumeinski

Contact: mtumeinski@holyapostles.edu

1 Course description

Welcome! The guiding question driving this course is, how can we in our parishes better reflect the Kingdom of God, especially in the ways that we recognize, welcome, honor & learn from the presence, gifts & contributions of children & adults with physical & intellectual impairments or emotional difficulties? This is a key question, particularly for ordained & lay ministers serving parishes. Our goal for this course is to come to a deeper understanding of Christian faith, vocation, catechesis, ministry & ecclesiology–in light of the presence of physical & intellectual impairment among our fellow disciples. As you can see, this course builds upon your prior theological knowledge & study.

We will consider our topic in relation to Revelation (Holy Scripture & Tradition) & Magisterial teaching. Our subject is considered, not as a specialized subset of Christian life or ministry, but rather as part of its core. This core concern reflects a key element of the Good News brought by Jesus: to welcome the least among us is to welcome Christ. Our focus is pastoral & ecclesial, rather than clinical, medical, legal or psychological. The course draws on selected readings, writing, online discussion, audio presentations, reflection & prayer to achieve the following objectives.

2 Learning Goals for the Course

As graduate students, you bear greater responsibility for your own learning. Students who are successful in this course will learn, & practice being able, to:

  1. Habitually (re)orient one’s understanding of persons with impairments toward the guiding light of the Gospel, rooted in the vision of the single flock under one Risen Lord
  2. Honor & appreciate what it takes to craft a long-term, sustainable, shared parish practice of faith & ministry with, to & by persons with impairment(s)
  3. Promote a deepening unity of the People of God as a witness & a service to the world

3 Course Objectives Related to the Major Course Goals

  1. Habitually (re)orient one’s understanding of persons with impairments toward the guiding light of the Gospel, rooted in the vision of the single flock under one Risen Lord
    1. Write about/discuss relevant elements of Scripture & Tradition that communicate the truth that each person is made in the image & likeness of God, regardless of ability
    2. Demonstrate through writing/dialogue a Christian understanding of significant differences in the physical & intellectual abilities of fellow disciples–particularly in light of a thorough examination of our worldly individual & communal attitudes towards persons with impairments
    3. Practice stepping into the shoes of children, adults & elders with impairments: trying to understand & see life from their perspective, appreciating what is universal & common to all persons, recognizing the image & likeness of God in each person
    4. Identify & discuss an understanding of the typical social reactions to people with impairments (i.e., societal devaluation) as an overriding factor in pastoral ministry, more significant even than the reality of physical &/or intellectual impairment
  2. Honor & appreciate what it takes to craft a long-term, sustainable, shared parish practice of faith & ministry with, to & by persons with impairment(s)
  3. Understand, describe & apply the model of shared practice (vision, dispositions, actions, grammar, memory, imagination, authority) of discipleship within a parish, vis-a-vis the reality of the Church as a community of disciples of all ages & abilities (the Body of Christ)
  4. Learn to describe & promote a vision of the Gospel-based sanctity of life of each & every person, at every age & stage of life; through the use of various catechetical tools
  5. Exercise a pastoral imagination to envision, invite, encourage & foster the practice of ministry to, & ministry by, persons with impairments
  6. Appreciate & learn various means of promoting & encouraging the practice of active engagement & hospitality–particularly within parishes–with those with impairments & their families, promoting the fullness of ecclesial life as much as possible
  7. Identifying partners & co-workers in the parish & beyond who can be helpful in carrying out pastoral ministry with, to & by persons with impairment(s)
  8. Describe/discuss relevant implications of ecclesial unity with children & adults with impairments for the Christian practice of: liturgy, ministry (lay & ordained), catechesis, service/charity, etc.
  9. Learn to find & evaluate other relevant resources, learning, models, practices & examples
  10. Promote a deepening unity of the People of God as a witness & a service to the world

4 General outline of our topics

I Setting a foundation (weeks 1-7)

  1. ‘Clearing the ground’ for our studies
  2. The reality of social & societal devaluation
  3. The framework of ‘shared practice’

II Life in the Church: koinonia, leitourgia, diakonia (weeks 8-13)

  1. The shared practice of koinonia
  2. The shared practice of leitourgia
  3. The shared practice of diakonia

III Witness to the world: martyria (week 14)

  1. The shared practice of martyria

IV Synthesis (week 15)

5 Tentative Schedule (NB: subject to change)

I Setting a foundation for the course (weeks 1-7)

II Life in the Church: koinonia, leitourgia, diakonia (weeks 8-13)

III Witness to the world: martyria (week 14)

IV Synthesis (week 15)

Part I

Week 1 Clearing the ground for our studies; the course concept of shared practice

reading:

  • Acts 2:42-47
  • Catechism of the Catholic Church, #s 781-786
  • USCCB, “Welcome & Justice for Persons with Disabilities”
  • USCCB, “Pastoral Statement of US Catholic Bishops on Persons with Disabilities”
  • Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities, pp. 8-14

optional reading:

  • Alasdair MacIntyre, After Virtue (especially the chapters on ‘virtue’)
  • Summa Theologiae, I-II, Qs 55-67

assignments:

  • class introduction (post & 2 replies)
  • syllabus acknowledgment

quick course poll on learning objectives

Week 2 Social & societal devaluation part 1 (who gets devalued?, who is denied access to the ‘good things of life’?)

reading:

  • Luke 10:27-37
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, #s 5, 29, 148
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, “The Good Life for Mentally Retarded Persons”
  • Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities, pp. 48-52

optional reading:

  • Summa Theologiae, I, Q 93; III, Qs 66-69
  • Jean Vanier, The Broken Body, Part One: Our Broken Body
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, A Brief Introduction to Social Role Valorization, pp. 7-11
  • Wolfensberger, Thomas & Caruso, Some of the universal ‘good things of life’...

sacramental focus: Baptism

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)

Week 3 Social & societal devaluation part 2 (negative perception followed by negative treatment)

reading:

  • Matthew 25:31-46
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, #s 115-119, 149-150, 201-203
  • What is the problem? by A.J. Hildebrand
  • What’s the real problem? by Tom Doody

optional reading:

  • Adam Hildebrand, One Person at a Time, Chapter 4: The Effects of Social Devaluation
  • Joe Osburn, An Overview of Social Role Valorization Theory
  • Jean Vanier, From Brokenness to Community
  • Thomas Neuville & C. Hannah Smith, SRV & teacher prep: Not just a course, but a course of action. The SRV Journal, 3(2), December 2008.

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • reaction journal #1

Week 4 Wounding (low social & societal status, rejection)

reading:

  • Deut 10:12-21
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, # 127-129, 164-165
  • Opening Doors to People with Disabilities, Vol II, Chapter 1, Section A.3.b, “The Wisdom of Human Vulnerability: The Tie Which Binds”

optional reading:

  • Wolf Wolfensberger, A Brief Introduction to Social Role Valorization, pp. 12-17

assignments:   

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #1 (draft)

Week 5 Wounding (loss of control, distantiation)

reading:

  • Psalm 137
  • Opening Doors to People with Disabilities, Vol II, Chapter 3, Section A.3.7.b, “Inclusion: Balancing the Ups & Downs”

optional reading:

  • Wolf Wolfensberger, A Brief Introduction to Social Role Valorization, pp. 18-19

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #1 (final)
  • mini-assignment #1

Week 6 Wounding (stigmatization, financial & experiential impoverishment)

reading:

  • Proverbs 22:16, 22; Amos 5:11-12
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, # 182-184, 359
  • Centesimus annus, #s 58-59

optional reading:

  • Wolf Wolfensberger, A Brief Introduction to Social Role Valorization, pp. 20-21

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • reaction journal #2
  • thought paper #2 (draft)

Week 7 Wounding (brutalization, abuse, ‘death-making’)

reading:

  • Exodus 20:13
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, #s 112, 118, 132, 144, 231
  • Evangelium vitae, #s 3, 4, 7-17, 64-67

optional reading:

  • Wolf Wolfensberger, A Brief Introduction to Social Role Valorization, pp. 22-24

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • mini-assignment #2
  • thought paper #2 (final)

Part II

Week 8 Koinonia (part 1)

reading:

  • 1 Cor 1:9
  • Pastoral Constitution on the Church ‘Gaudium et spes,’ #5
  • Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities, pp. 15-20

optional reading:

  • Opening Doors to People with Disabilities, Vol II, Chapter 3, Section A.4.b, “Placement Options"
  • Summa Theologiae, III, Qs 84-90
  • Jean Vanier, Community & Growth, esp. chapters 1 & 7
  • Wolfensberger, “How We Carry the Ministry with Handicapped Persons to the Parish Level”

sacramental focus: Reconciliation

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #3 (draft)
  • reaction journal #3

poll:

  • midsemester (anonymous) online evaluation

Week 9 Koinonia (part 2)

reading:

  • Matthew 12:50
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, # 322
  • Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities, pp. 33-41
  • Wolfensberger, “The Normative Lack of Christian Communality in Local Congregations as the Central Obstacle to a Proper Relationship with Needy Members” (1992)

optional reading:

  • Jean Vanier, The Broken Body, Part Two: God’s Unfolding Plan
  • Timothy Estes, A Humanizing Ministry, chapter: “The Caring Community”
  • Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, Believing, Belonging, Becoming: Stories of Faith Inclusion (DVD)

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #3 (final)
  • mini-assignment #3

Week 10 Leitourgia (part 1)

reading:

  • Phil 2:16-17
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, # 529
  • NCCB, “Guidelines for the Celebration of the Sacraments with Persons with Disabilities”
  • Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities, pp. 21-27

optional reading:

  • Summa Theologiae, III, Qs 73-83

sacramental focus: Eucharist

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #4 (draft)
  • reaction journal #4

Week 11 Leitourgia (part 2)

reading:

  • Luke 24:35
  • Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities, pp. 28-32
  • Post-synodal apostolic exhortation ‘Sacramentum caritatis’, #s 52-63

optional reading:

  • Mary Therese Harrington, A Place for All

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #4 (final)
  • mini-assignment #4

Week 12 Diakonia (part 1)

reading:

  • Acts 6:1
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, #s 552-553
  • Tada & Bundy, Beyond Suffering, module 3, lesson 10: “How to Start a Disability Ministry in the Church”

optional reading:

  • Opening Doors to People with Disabilities, Vol II, Chapter 3, Section E.3.g, “Pastoral Care & Mental Illness” & Section E.3.h, “A Personal Reflection on Mental Illness"
  • Jean Vanier, The Broken Body, Part Three: Restoring the Broken Body to Wholeness
  • Encyclical letter ‘Caritas in veritate’, #s 1-9, 68-77

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #5 (draft)
  • reaction journal #5

Week 13 Diakonia (part 2)

reading:

  • 1 Cor 12:5
  • Catechism, #s 1822-1829
  • National Catholic Partnership on Disability, Catechesis with Those with Disability (webinar transcript)

assignments:   

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #5 (final)
  • mini-assignment #5

Part III

Week 14 Martyria

reading:

  • 1 John 5:11
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, # 543
  • Opening Doors to People with Disabilities, Vol II, Chapter 3, Section E.1, “Images of God through the Lens of Disability”
  • Evangelium vitae, #s 95-100

optional reading:

  • Summa Theologiae, III, Q 72
  • Chatham-Savannah Citizen Advocacy, Disciples Among Us
  • Griff Hogan, Ed., The Church & Disabled Persons, Part I: Ministry

sacramental focus: Confirmation

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #6 (draft)
  • reaction journal #6

Part IV

Week 15 Synthesis

reading:

  • Matthew 28:16-20
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, #s 547-548, 577-583
  • Disability & Theology: The Call & Promise for Pastoral Leadership & Theological Education (audio recordings & resources from the 2010 Summer Institute on Theology & Disability)

assignments:

  • posting (post & 2 replies)
  • thought paper #6 (final)
  • mini-assignment #6

6 Course Expectations

You will only be able to achieve these learning goals & objectives if you make the required efforts over the semester. Such efforts include the following four (4) areas:

a) Class Participation

Particularly given the graduate level of this course, substantive participation in this class is necessary, including participation in partner & group work. Part of my role is to provide a hospitable framework where you can learn; part of yours is to participate within this class framework. I am available for individual communication & please consider your fellow students as valuable resources for learning as well.

b) Class Contribution

You will be expected to participate in online discussions & to contribute information to the class. In order to learn & to contribute to others’ learning, you must add something of substance to our discussions; this would consist for example of new ideas, points of clarification, making reference to a course text or outside reading, your own perspectives, follow-up questions, examples, etc.

c) Reading & Viewing of Assigned Materials

The materials we will be reading & viewing will give us a foundation for accomplishing the course objectives & provide a base for online class discussions. Writing & posting exercises will help ensure that you are keeping up with the reading. 

d) Completing Required Assignments On Time

Assignment details & rubrics will be provided in separate documents. Late assignments will be given a 10% grade deduction for each day late unless you have made prior arrangements with me. Any time you feel you might be falling behind in the course, contact me right away to discuss your situation.

7 Methods of Instruction

The learning & instruction methods which we will use in this course include lecture notes with some recorded lecture audio, online discussion, partner & group work, student writing, student reading & journaling.

8 Online Courtesy

  • Always include a subject line with every email.
  • Be polite. Start all notes with a proper salutation.
  • Check the spelling.
  • Take another look before you send a message. Email is a public domain.
  • Be careful with irony & tone.
  • Writing in all caps is like shouting.
  • Please do not use the same abbreviations or slang as when text or instant messaging.

9 Assessment & Grading

My intent is to create an atmosphere that honors the maturity of students & to minimize needless fixation on grades, so that each student can focus on their learning & on their personal goals for the course.

Grading criteria include:

  • thought papers (30%)
  • online classroom discussion (30%)
  • other online classroom activities (40%)

10A Required Texts

Text to purchase:

  • National Catholic Partnership on Disability, "Opening Doors of Welcome and Justice to Parishioners with Disabilities: A Parish Resource Guide" (available from USCCB)

Selections from the following will be made available online:

  • Catholic Bible (e.g, the Revised Standard Version-Catholic Edition, New American Bible, Jerusalem Bible, etc.).
  • Catechism of the Catholic Church
  • Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church
  • USCCB, “Welcome & Justice for Persons with Disabilities”  (1998)
  • NCCB, “Guidelines for the Celebration of the Sacraments with Persons with Disabilities” (1998)
  • USCCB, “Pastoral Statement of US Catholic Bishops on Persons with Disabilities” (1998)
  • Joni Eareckson Tada & Steve Bundy, eds., Beyond Suffering: A Christian View on Disability & Ministry, Agoura Hills, CA: Christian Institute on Disability, 2011
  • National Catholic Partnership on Disability, Opening Doors to People with Disabilities (2 volume set)

10B Optional Texts

Note that the following texts are not required for this course. Rather, they provide relevant optional material for personal (future) study.

  • Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas Aquinas (any translation)
  • Benedict XVI, Post-synodal apostolic exhortation "Sacramentum caritatis" (2007)
  • Benedict XVI, Encyclical letter "Caritas in veritate" (2009)
  • Chatham-Savannah Citizen Advocacy, "Disciples Among Us" (2000)
  • Timothy Estes, "A Humanizing Ministry," Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1984
  • Mary Therese Harrington, "A Place for All," Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 1992
  • Adam Hildebrand, "One Person at a Time," Newton, MA: Brookline Books, 2004 (chapter 4: The effects of social devaluation)
  • Griff Hogan, Ed., "The Church & Disabled Persons," Springfield, Illinois: Templegate Publishers, 1983
  • John Paul II, Encyclical letter "Centesimus annus" (1991)
  • John Paul II, "Evangelium vitae" (1995)
  • The Journal of The Christian Institute on Disability
  • Alasdair MacIntyre, "After Virtue" (multiple editions available)
  • National Catholic Partnership on Disability, "Catechesis with those with disability" (2008) (webinar transcripts)
  • Second Vatican Council, Pastoral Constitution on the Church "Gaudium et spes" (1965)
  • Thomas Neuville & C. Hannah Smith, "SRV & teacher prep: Not just a course, but a course of action." The SRV Journal, 3(2), December 2008.
  • Joe Osburn, "An Overview of Social Role Valorization Theory." (2006). The SRV Journal, 1(1), 4-13.
  • Disability & Theology: The Call & Promise for Pastoral Leadership & Theological Education (audio recordings & resources from the 2010 Summer Institute on Theology & Disability)
  • Joni Eareckson Tada & Steve Bundy, eds., "Beyond Suffering: A Christian View on Disability & Ministry," Agoura Hills, CA: Christian Institute on Disability, 2011
  • USCCB, "Welcome & Justice for Persons with Disabilities" (1998)
  • Jean Vanier, "The Broken Body," New York: Paulist Press, 1988
  • Jean Vanier, "Community & Growth," rev. ed., New York: Paulist Press, 1989
  • Jean Vanier, "From Brokenness to Community," New Jersey: Paulist Press, 1992
  • Wisconsin Council on Developmental Disabilities, "Believing, Belonging, Becoming: Stories of Faith Inclusion" (DVD)
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, "How We Carry the Ministry with Handicapped Persons to the Parish Level." (1983). National Apostolate with Mentally Retarded Persons Quarterly, 14(9), 12-13.
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, "The Good Life for Mentally Retarded Persons." (1984). National Apostolate with Mentally Retarded Persons Quarterly, 15(3), 18-20.
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, "The Normative Lack of Christian Communality in Local Congregations as the Central Obstacle to a Proper Relationship with Needy Members." (2011). Journal of Religion, Disability & Health, 4(2/3), 111-126.
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, :A Brief Introduction to Social Role Valorization," 2nd. (rev.) ed., Syracuse, NY: Training Institute, 2004
  • Wolf Wolfensberger, Susan Thomas & Guy Caruso, "Some of the universal ‘good things of life’ which the implementation of Social Role Valorization can be expected to make more accessible to devalued people." (1996). The International Social Role Valorization Journal, 2(2), 12-14.

11 Further Details on Grading/Assignments:

  • thought papers (6) (30%)
  • online classroom discussion (30%): Online weekly discussion posts: initial post plus comments (15) (30%)
  • other online classroom activities (40%)
    • Concept maps (4) (16%) (NB: submitted by end of semester at student’s choice)
    • Reading reaction journal entries (written or recorded) (6) (18%)
    • 5-minute mini-assignments (6) (6%)

Students who have difficulty with research & composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

An A grade, which each one of you is capable of achieving, indicates: excellent comprehension, good analysis & synthesis of course material; clear & frequent contributions to class online discussions; on-time completion of all assignments; commitment to & practice of collaborative work with your peers; highly proficient completion of written course projects; no missed classes.

Points

Grade

94+

A

90-93

A-

87-89

B+

84-86

B

80-83

B-

77-79

C+

74-76

C

70-73

C-

60-69

D

<=59

F

 

12. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

13 Attendance

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

14 Incomplete Policy

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course & has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester & on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

15 Academic Honesty

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own. At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address & publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews or websites.
  • Should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles or websites.
  • Should follow the guidelines of the HACS stylesheet http://holyapostles.edu/sites/default/files/forms/HACS_%20Style_Sheet.pdf

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously. Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course & from the program.

16 About Your Professor

As a Catholic, I am particularly inspired by the lives of Dorothy Day & Peter Maurin, who in the 1930s in New York City started the Catholic Worker, a movement which shelters the homeless & works for peace. Through our connection with a local Catholic Worker house, my wife & I have often shared our home with people who are poor or homeless. These experiences brought me to study my faith in a more rigorous fashion: I received an MA in Dogmatic Theology in 2007 from Holy Apostles College & Seminary, & am currently a PhD candidate in Catholic theology at the Maryvale Institute of Liverpool Hope University in the UK. Blessed John Henry Newman in 1846 started a retreat house at Maryvale after he joined the Catholic Church. In addition to my teaching & studies, I have worked providing training to human service agencies in a variety of human service fields (including aging, mental health, mental retardation, education) since 1994. I will draw on this experience in my teaching for this course.

(860) 632-3010