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Course Number: PHL 100
Course Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Philosophical and Theological Principles of Leadership
and Organization
Summer: Hybrid, June 9 – August 15, 2014

Professor

Dr. Peter Redpath, redpathp@gmail.com

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will consider the nature of St. Thomas Aquinas’s teaching about the nature of leadership, organizations, and how to manage organizations in light of his teaching about the psychological faculties, habits, and virtues of human nature and how these relate to human leadership.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate an improved understanding of St. Thomas Aquinas’s teaching about the following subjects: (1) the psychological faculties, habits, and virtues of human nature and how these relate to human leadership; (2) the nature of leadership, organizations, and how to manage organizations.

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Pre-Start-of-Class Assignments

Before starting any readings in this course, in no more than 250 words, as best you can, explain what you think, or what you think St. Thomas Aquinas maintains, are (1) the psychological faculties, habits, and virtues of human nature and how these relate to human leadership; (2) the nature of leadership, organizations, and how to manage organizations. Email to course instructor so that it is received by the instructor by no later than midnight Sunday, June 8, before the start of the course.

You will not be graded on this assignment. At the end of the course, you will be asked to answer the same questions so that you have some realistic measure of how much this course has helped you improve your understanding of these topics.

Process consisting of 4 parts:

Part 1: Pre-Seminar Class Start of Course Readings and five (10 hours) Online Socratic-style discussions:*

For Day 1 (June 9) Topics:

  1. Plato, MenoGorgiasRepublicBooks 1, 2, 4, and 7.
  2. G.K. Chesterton, St. Thomas Aquinas: The Dumb Ox.
  3. St. Thomas Aquinas, Commentary on the Politics of Aristotle, Book 1.
  4. On-Line, instructor-led and intern-assisted 2-hour long Socratic discussions about Topics of Day 1.

For Day 2 (June 12) Topic:

  1. St. Thomas’s, “Treatise on Man,” Summa theologiae, Part 1, question 75 up to and including question 88.
  2. St. Thomas's teaching on the human emotions (or passions)Summa theologiae, First Part of the Second Part, question 22 up to and including question 48.
  3. Josef Pieper, The Four Cardinal Virtues: Prudence, Justice, Fortitude: Temperance
  4. On-Line, instructor-led and intern-assisted 2-hour long Socratic discussions about Topics of Day 2.

For Day 3 (June 17) Topics:

  1. Viewing Two 1-Hour-long video lectures (12 [both parts] and 13 [both parts]) by Dr. Redpath on Day 3 topics from his course on “The One and the Many.”
  2. Readings: Selections from Dr. Redpath’s transcript for (Video Lectures 12 [both parts] and 13) on St. Thomas’s teachings about Day 3 topics.
  3. On-Line, instructor-led and intern-assisted 2-hour long Socratic discussions about Topics of Day 3.

For Day 4 (June 19) Topics:

  1. Viewing Two 1-Hour-long video lectures (14 [both parts] and 15 [both parts]) by Dr. Redpath on Day 4 topics from his course on “The One and the Many.”
  2. Readings: Selections from Dr. Redpath’s transcript for Video Lectures 14 and 15 on St. Thomas’s teachings about Day 4 topics.
  3. Reading St. Thomas Aquinas, On Kingship to the King of Cyprus.
  4. On-Line, instructor-led and intern-assisted 2-hour long Socratic discussions about Topics of Day 4.

For Day 5: (June 24)

Two-hour online On-Line, instructor-led and intern-assisted 2-hour long Socratic discussions about Topics of Days 1 through 4.

*NOTE: Part 1 of this course will largely consist of instructor-directed and intern-assisted student discussion of the readings. The students will be questioned chiefly about what they think the texts say, whether they agree or disagree with claims made, and chiefly why they agree or disagree. Instructor and intern direction will chiefly focus on guiding the discussion through assisting student to cross-question each other about what an author is saying, whether they agree or disagree with this or that claim made by an author or student, and precisely why they agree or disagree. This part of the course will not focus on detailed textual analysis.

Part 2: Pre-Seminar Class - 9 (18 hours) Online Socratic-style discussions:**

Day 1 (June 26) Topic Title: Philosophical Background for Understanding St. Thomas’s Teaching about Leadership and Organization.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of Plato and Aristotle’s teaching about philosophy, leadership, and organizations.

Day 2 (June 30) Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas and Some Philosophical Background for Understanding St. Thomas’s Teaching about Leadership and Organization.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of Plato’s and Aristotle’s teachings about philosophy, leadership, and organizations.

Day 3 (July 1) Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Human Person, Human Motivation, and Moral and Intellectual Virtues.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Human Person.

Day 4 (July 2) Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Human Person, Human Motivation, and Moral and Intellectual Virtues.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of the Human Emotions, their relation to the divisions of the human soul, and to being about to lead people.

Day 5 (July 3) Topic Title: St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims and How These Relate to his Teaching about Leadership and Organizations.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims.

Day 6 (July 8) Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims and How These Relate to his Teaching about Leadership and Organizations.

Day 7 (July 9) Topic Title: St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership, Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership and Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Day 8 (July 10) Topic Title: St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership, Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Online Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership and Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Day 9 (July 11) Topic: Online 2- hour Review of Days 1 through 8

**NOTE: Part 2 of this course will largely consist of instructor-directed and intern-assisted student discussion of the readings. The students will be questioned chiefly about what they think the texts say in contrast to what the text actually says. In contrast to Part 1, students will be asked more than whether they agree or disagree with claims made, and chiefly why they agree or disagree. They will have to justify agreement or disagreement by reference to parts of the text to justify the claims they make. Instructor and intern direction will chiefly focus on guiding the discussion through assisting student to cross-question each other about what an author is saying in relation to what the text actually says and what students are claiming the text says.

Part 3: Pre-Seminar Class Part of Course Writing Assignment

Write a paper of no less than 10 complete pages (double spaced; New Times Roman font; no wider than 1 inch margins on all sides) summarizing the discussion topics covered in Parts 1 and 2 of this syllabus. Email a copy of that paper as an attachment to course instructor so that it is received by him no later than midnight, Monday July 28, 2014.

Part 4: 9 Immaculate Conception Seminary classes (18 hours)

Offered to offsite participants via Adobe Connect. Students not participating in live, classroom discussion will, at an appointed time, receive the video broadcast from one of the video classrooms at the Seminary.***

Monday, August 4, Day 1, Morning Topic Title: Philosophical Background for Understanding St. Thomas’s Teaching about Leadership and Organization.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of Plato’s and Aristotle’s teaching about philosophy, leadership, and organizations.

Monday, August 4, Day 1, Afternoon Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas and Some Philosophical Background for Understanding St. Thomas’s Teaching about Leadership and Organization.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of Plato’s and Aristotle’s teaching about philosophy, leadership, and organizations.

Tuesday, August 5, Day 2 Morning Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Human Person, Human Motivation, and Moral and Intellectual Virtues.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion about St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Human Person.

Tuesday, August 5, Day 2 Afternoon Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Human Person, Human Motivation, and Moral and Intellectual Virtues.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of the Human Emotions, their relation to the divisions of the human soul, and to being about to lead people.

Wednesday, August 6, Day 3, Morning Topic Title: St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims and How These Relate to his Teaching about Leadership and Organizations.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims.

Wednesday August 6, Day 3 Afternoon Topic Title: St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Unity, Opposition, and Aims and How These Relate to his Teaching about Leadership and Organizations.

Thursday, August 7, Day 4 Morning Topic Title: St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership, Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of St. Thomas  Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership and Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Thursday, August 7, Day 4 Afternoon Topic Title: St. Thomas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership, Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Onsite Course Assignment: Socratic class discussion and textual analysis of St. Thomas Aquinas’s Teaching about the Nature of Leadership and Organizations, and How to Manage Organizations as a Truly Great Leader.

Friday, August 8, Day 5 Morning Topic: 2 hour review of Course material.

NOTE: Part 3 of this course will largely consist of instructor-directed discussion and lecture regarding the readings. In contrast to Parts 1 and 2 of this course students will have to justify their agreements or disagreements with the interpretation of a text made by other students and the instructor by reference to the text.

Students who are unable to participate in the Adobe connect discussion, may listen to a taped version of it on website and email instructor a minimum 500-word commentary on the discussion in which they express their agreement or disagreement with some claims made during the discussion and why, based upon an analysis of the text, they agree or disagree. Do not name the person making the claim. Just identify the nature of the claim and state precisely why you agree or disagree with it. Email me your responses (at redpathp@gmail.com) so that instructor receive them by midnight 18 August 2014.

Do not email the commentaries as an attachment! Put them into the body of the email. In the subject line of the email, put your Name, Lecture number, and Topic of Discussion to which the email replies (for example, Day 4, Afternoon Topic).

Part 5: Post-Oral Exam Paper:

Write a paper of no less than 15 complete pages (double spaced; New Times Roman font; no wider than 1 inch margins on all sides) comparing and contrasting St. Thomas Aquinas’s teaching about the nature of leadership to that of any major ancient, medieval, modern, or contemporary political, military, or business leader. This is to be a syntopical, rather than a research, paper. Simply compare and contrast the teaching on St. Thomas on one of the topics covered to that of any other major thinker or leader in the Western tradition.

After finishing all the above assignments as best you can, explain what you think, in no more than 250 words, that St. Thomas Aquinas maintains are (1) the psychological faculties, habits, and virtues of human nature and how these relate to human leadership; (2) the nature of leadership, organizations, and how to manage organizations.

Email the Part 5 assignment to the course instructor so that it is received by the instructor by no later than August 15, 2014.

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • Pre-Start-Of-Course Intern-led Student Discussions: 10% Beginning June 9, 2014
  • Completion of Viewing Videos and Required Readings: 20%
  • Participation in Online Course Discussions led by Dr. Redpath: 30%
  • Oral Exam: 20% Held August 8, 2014
  • Post-Exam Paper: 20% Due August 15, 2014

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

6. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

CONTENT

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Absence of Understanding

Posting shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Posting demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Posting demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Posting demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

RESEARCH

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; poor quality of chosen sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors.

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format.

WRITING & EXPRESSION

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Incomplete writing

 

Posting is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Posting touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Posting is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment;  satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Posting is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

command-level writing, making a clear impression

Posting is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds.

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds.

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development.

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development.

 

7. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. ATTENDANCE POLICY

This class is being taught in a hybrid technology-mediated and face-to-face environment, and it is important to actively participate each week in the course, especially during the synchronous (live) lecture and discussion times. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions and papers the equivalent of six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week over a 15-week period for a total of 37.5 hours of direct faculty instruction (DFI) and 75 hours of outside readings and assignments. This course runs through a 10-week period, so the expectations of time invested each week have to be adjusted to meet the federal requirement totaling 112.5 hours of engaged study time, which breaks down to an average of 3.75 hours of DFI each week (a total of 37.5 for the term) and 7.5 hours of outside readings and assignments (i.e., outside work that is in addition to the live discussions, for a total of 75 for the term). Expect to devote, then, an average of 11.25 hours a week to this course.

10. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

11. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Peter A. Redpath, Ph.D., AAI Rector, Fellow

Dr. Redpath was Professor of Philosophy at St. John’s University from 1970 to 2011. Author /editor of 10 philosophical books and many dozens of articles and book reviews; over 200 invited guest lectures nationally and internationally; co-founder of the Gilson Society (USA) and The International Etienne Gilson Society; former vice-president of the American Maritain Association; Founding Chairman of the Board of the Angelicum Academy; Member of the Board of the Great Books Academy; member Board of Trustees of the Institute for Advanced Philosophic Research; member of Board and Executive Committee of the Catholic Education Foundation; Academician of The Catholic Academy of Sciences (USA); former executive editor of Value Inquiry Book Series; former editor of the Studies in the History of Western Philosophy (SHWP), editor of the Gilson Studies (GS) special series for Editions Rodopi, B. V.; former associate editor, and current advisor of the journal Contemporary Philosophy; recipient of St. John’s University’s Outstanding Achievement Award, and Socratic Fellowship Award from the Great Books Academy; inaugural inductee as distinguished alumnus of Xaverian High School; and former Graduate Fellow of SUNY at Buffalo. In 2011 Dr. Redpath moved to Cave Creek, AZ in part to devote his time to teaching for and developing the Adler-Aquinas Institute.

(860) 632-3010