Skip to main content

Online Learning

Course Number: LIT 614A (DL)
Course Title: The Eucharistic Liturgy of the Western Church
Term: Fall 2014

Instructor

Fr. Dennis Koliński, SJC

dkolinski@holyapostles.edu

860-632-3809

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

Over the past several decades, there has been much discussion, as well as controversy, about the liturgy. But if we are to have an educated discussion about it, we must understand liturgy and its spirit. We have to ask “what is Catholic liturgy”? To help answer this question, this course will examine the history, theology and spirituality of the Mass of the Roman Rite, following its historical development, both as a whole and in its individual elements, from the first century down to the present day. It will also look at the role of the arts in liturgy, current liturgical issues, the hermeneutic of continuity and the new liturgical movement.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the following:

1. Foundational concepts essential to study of the liturgy

2. The historical development of the Mass of the Roman Rite as a whole

3. The individual elements of the Mass of the Roman Rite

4. The modern Liturgical Movement

5. The liturgical reform of Vatican II and its implementation

6. The role of beauty, music and architecture in the liturgy

7. The hermeneutic of continuity and the liturgical reform of Pope Benedict XVI

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week 1: Introduction and foundational concepts for a study of the Mass of the Roman Rite

Readings

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy (pp. 110 – 171, 397 – 401)
  • Reid, Alcuin, The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council (pp. 9 – 18)

Supplemental Readings

  • Fortesque, Adrian, “The Liturgy of the Mass”
  • Fortesque, Adrian, “Liturgy”

Assignments

  • Quiz 1
  • Discussion Board 1

Week 2: Understanding the concepts of sign, symbol, ritual and liturgy as applied to Catholic worship

Readings

  • Cooper, Adam G, “A Liturgical Theology of the Body: Sign and Symbol”
  • Notes on sign, symbol and liturgy from:
  • Vagaggini, Cyprian OSB, Theological Dimensions of the Liturgy, volume 1
  • Louis, Bouyer, Rite and Man: Natural Sacredness and Christian Liturgy

Assignments

  • Quiz 2
  • Discussion Board 2

Week 3: History of the Mass: 1st – 3rd centuries

Readings

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy (pp. 75; 80 – 109; 113 – 127)
  • Reid, Alcuin, The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council (pp. 19 -21)
  • A summary of: Klauser, Theodor, A Short History of the Western Liturgy, Introduction & Chapter 1: “The Early Liturgy”
  • Didache (Chapters 9 & 14)
  • St. Justyn Martyr (Chapters 65 – 67)
  • Apostolic Constitutions (Book VIII)

Assignments

  • Quiz 3

Week 4: History of the Mass: 4th – 11th centuries

Readings

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy (pp. 76 – 109, 172 – 184)
  • Reid, Alcuin, The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council (pp. 21 – 27)
  • A summary of: Klauser, Theodor, A Short History of the Western Liturgy, Chapter 2: “The Early Medieval Liturgy”

Assignments

  • Quiz 4

Week 5: History of the Mass: 12th – 18th centuries

Readings

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy (pp. 184 – 213)
  • Reid, Alcuin, The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council (pp. 27 – 49)
  • A summary of: Klauser, Theodor, A Short History of the Western Liturgy, Chapter 3: “The Later Medieval Liturgy” and Chapter 4: “The Tridentine Liturgy”

Assignments

  • Quiz 5

Week 6: History of the Mass: 19th – 20th centuries

Readings

  • Reid, Alcuin, The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council (pp. 49 – 311)

Assignments

  • Quiz 6
  • Discussion Board 3

Week 7: Elements of the Mass I

The Mass of the Catechumens/Liturgy of the Word

The Mass of the Faithful/Liturgy of the Eucharist—Offertory to the Sanctus

Readings

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy (pp. 214 – 323)

Week 8: Elements of the Mass II

The Mass of the Faithful/Liturgy of the Eucharist—The Canon to the conclusion of the Mass

Readings

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy (pp. 323 – 395)
  • Mediator Dei (from the Internet)

Assignments

  • MIDTERM EXAM DUE

Week 9: Sacrosanctum Concilium and the liturgical reform of Vatican II

Readings

  • Sacrosanctum Concilium
  • Arinze, Cardinal Francis, “Some Highlights of the Liturgical Renewal Initiated by Sacrosanctum Concilium
  • Conley, James D., “ ‘A Universe Brimming with Fruitful Spiritual Life’: Reflecting Transcendence in the Liturgy”
  • Hitchcock, James, “The Liturgical Revolution,” The Recovery of the Sacred, chapter 1.
  • Folsom, Cassian, O.S.B., “From One Eucharistic Prayer to Many: How it Happened and Why”
  • Hitchcock, Helen Hull & Benofy, Susan, “Origin of ICEL'S ‘Original Texts’ ”

Additional material for review

  • Sample pages from post-Vatican II missals & sacramentaries

Assignments

  • Discussion Board 4
  • SUBMIT THE TOPIC YOU HAVE CHOSEN FOR THE FINAL RESEARCH PAPER

Week 10: Spirituality of the Mass of the Roman Rite

Readings

  • Sheen, Fulton, “Calvary and the Mass”
  • Guéranger, Dom Prosper, O.S.B., “Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of Holy Mass
  • Guardini, Romano, “The Spirit of the Liturgy”
  • Koliński, Dennis SJC, “Mystery and the Sacred in the Early Church”
  • Meditations on the Passion of the Lord used to follow the Traditional Mass

Week 11: Sacred music in the liturgy of the Roman Rite I

Readings

  • Pius X, Tra le Sollecitudini
  • Pius XII, Musicae Sacrae
  • Sacred Congregation for Rites, Musicam Sacram
  • Caron, Sr. Bernadette, “Vatican II and the Hermeneutic of Continuity in Sacred Liturgical Music”
  • GIRM on music in the liturgy (nos. 39 – 41, 47 – 48, 52 – 53, 61 – 64, 67 – 68, 74, 81, 83, 86 – 88, 103, 366 – 367)
  • Mitchell, David, “The Origins of Early Christian Liturgical Music”
  • “Old Roman Chant”
  • Required music videos of sacred music (YouTube links)

Assignments

  • Quiz 7
  • Discussion Board 5

Week 12: Sacred music in the liturgy of the Roman Rite II

Readings

  • “Frequently Asked Questions On Sacred Music,” Church Music Association of America
  • Mahrt, William, “The Musical Shape of the Liturgy, Part I: The Gregorian Mass in General,” The Musical Shape of the Liturgy
  • Mahrt, William, “Gregorian Chant as Fundamentum of Western Musical Culture: An Introduction to Singing the Solemn High Mass,” The Musical Shape of the Liturgy
  • Mahrt, William, “Active Participation and Listening to Gregorian Chant,” The Musical Shape of the Liturgy
  • Required music videos of sacred music (YouTube links)

Assignments

  • Quiz 8

Week 13: Art and beauty in the liturgy & vestments of the Roman Rite

Readings

  • Sacrosanctum Concilium, Chapter VII: Sacred Art and Sacred Furnishings (nos. 122 – 129)
  • Catechism of the Catholic Church: on Art and Beauty (nos. 2500 – 2503)
  • Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis (no. 41)
  • Lew, Lawrence, OP, “Beauty is of the Essence of Liturgy”
  • Ratzinger, Joseph, “The Feeling of Things, the Contemplation of Beauty”
  • “The Pope Theologian Says: The Proof of God Is Beauty”
  • Brankin, Anthony, “The Cult of Ugliness in America”
  • Required videos on sacred art (YouTube links)

Supplemental Reading

  • “Liturgy and Beauty: Experiences of renewal in certain Papal Liturgical Celebrations”
  • “Liturgical Vestments and the Vesting Prayers” (Office for the Liturgical Celebrations of the Supreme Pontiff)
  • “Vestments”
  • (Articles on individual elements of Catholic liturgical vestments can be found in the online Catholic Encyclopedia on www.newadvent.org)

Assignments

  • Discussion Board 6

Week 14: Ecclesiastical architecture of the Western Church

Readings

  • Ratzinger, Joseph, "Sacred Places: The Significance of the Church Building" (from:The Spirit of the Liturgy")
  • Rigali, Cardinal Justin, “Sacred Architecture: Encountering the Beauty and Mystery of God”
  • Lang, Uwe Michael, “Louis Bouyer and Church Architecture: Resourcing Benedict XVI's The Spirit of the Liturgy
  • Lucas, Herbert, “Ecclesiastical Architecture”
  • Tribe, Shawn, “The Iconography of San Clemente”
  • McNamara, Denis, “Bearers of the Heavenly Jerusalem: Vatican II and Development in Church Architecture”
  • McNamara, Denis, “The Spirit of Mediator Dei”
  • Required videos on sacred architecture (YouTube links)

Supplemental Reading

  • Quotes on Architecture by Pope Benedict XV

Week 15: Reflections on the future of the Roman Rite

Readings

  • Aillet, Marc. The Old Mass and the New: Explaining the Motu proprio “Summorum pontificum” of Pope Benedict XVI. Ignatius, 2010.
  • Summorum Pontificum and accompanying letter
  • Universae Ecclesiae
  • Hitchcock, Helen Hull, “Pope Benedict XVI and the Liturgical Reform”
  • Supplemental Reading
  • Roy, Neil J., Rutherford, Janet E. (editors), Benedict XVI and the Sacred Liturgy

Assignments

  • Discussion Board 7
  • FINAL RESEARCH PAPER DUE

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • Midterm Exam—40%
  • Final Paper—40%
  • Quizzes—10%
  • Discussion Postings—10%

READINGS

Reading assignments are listed under each individual weekly lesson tab.

Because this is a graduate level course, a substantial amount of required reading should be expected if one hopes to gain a reasonable understanding of this subject. But because this is more than just an academic subject, what you read should also be taken into your personal experience of the Mass. It should provide material for your personal spiritual reflection on the Mass and encourage you to continue to read the additional suggested texts as a way to further enrich your understanding of the Mass.

QUIZZES

There will be periodic quizzes to test your understanding of the material from specific lessons. Your answers are due by 12:00 midnight EST on Saturday of the week under which the quiz is listed.

DISCUSSION POSTINGS

You will be required to make periodic Discussion Board postings. In contrast to Quizzes, which test your knowledge of subject matter, Discussion Board postings will be subjective comments and reflections on a specific topic. The Discussion Board is a forum for intelligent and civil discussion. IT IS NOT AN OPEN FORUM FOR GRIEVANCES OR RANTS ABOUT LITURGICAL ABUSES. POSTS OF THIS SORT WILL BE MARKED AGAINST THE STUDENT’S GRADE.

MIDTERM EXAM

The Midterm Exam will be due by 12:00 midnight EST on Saturday of Week 8. This will be a closed book exam to be taken on Populi, which will consist of short answers, as well as essays.

FINAL RESEARCH PAPER

You must submit the topic of your Final Research Paper by 12:00 midnight EST on Saturday of Week 9. A list of suggested topics will be listed under the Lesson Tab for Week 9. You may, however, submit a topic of your own choosing but it must be approved by the instructor.

The Final Research Paper will be due by 12:00 midnight EST on Saturday of Week 15. It must be double spaced, using Times New Roman Font, 12 point, with one-inch margins. The paper should be at least 12 full pages, but no longer than 15, in length. You must use a minimum of five sources for your material, which should be listed in a bibliography at the end of the paper. Wikipedia will not be accepted as a source for  your paper. Quotes and sources must be referenced by endnotes (not footnotes). It is expected that all bibliographic entries and endnotes will follow a consistent accepted academic style. The grade for papers submitted after the due date will be reduced in proportion to how long it is past due.

Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

  • Fortescue, Adrian, The Mass: A Study of the Roman Liturgy. Loreto Publications—$19.95. ISBN no. 978-1930278264 (1930278268)
  • Reid, Alcuin, The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council. Ignatius Press—$16.12. ISBN no. 978-1-58617-106-3
  • Aillet, Marc. The Old Mass and the New: Explaining the Motu proprio “Summorum pontificum” of Pope Benedict XVI. Ignatius Press—$11.13. ISBN no. 9781586173623
  • Additional articles on specific topics (links supplied)

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

  • Bouyer, Louis, Eucharist: Theology and Spirituality
  • Bouyer, Louis, Life and Liturgy
  • Crouan, Denis. The History and the Future of the Roman Liturgy
  • De musica sacra et sacra liturgia (from the Internet)
  • Dix, Dom Gregory, The Shape of the Liturgy
  • Dunney, Joseph, The Mass
  • Gamber Klause, The Reform of the Roman Liturgy: Its Problems and Background
  • Guardini Romano, the Church and the Catholic & The Spirit of the Liturgy
  • Hahn, Scott, The Lamb’s Supper
  • Hemming, Laurence Paul. Worship as Revelation: The Past, Present and Future of Catholic Liturgy
  • Jungmann, J.A., Mass of the Roman Rite
  • Jungmann, J.A., Public Worship
  • Klauser, Theodor, A Short History of the Western Liturgy
  • Meagher, James, How Christ Said the First Mass
  • Metzger, Marcel. History of the Liturgy: The Major Stages
  • Mitchell, Leonel, The Meaning of Ritual
  • Musicae Sacrae
  • Mystici Corporis
  • Nichols, Aiden. Lost in Wonder
  • Ratzinger, Joseph, The Spirit of the Liturgy
  • Rousseau, Dom Olivier, The Progress of the Liturgy
  • The Church at Prayer: An Introduction to the Liturgy (Volumes 1 & 2)
  • Vagaggini, Cyprian, Theological Dimensions of the Liturgy

7. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

After completing undergraduate studies at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in 1974, Fr. Koliński did postgraduate study at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland where he received an M.A. in Slavic Ethnography. During that time, in the late 1970s and early 1980s he also had the rare opportunity to witness firsthand the effects that John Paul II’s election to the papacy had on his homeland, his first visit to Poland as pope, the birth and growth of Solidarity and the eventual imposition of Martial Law.

After returning to the United States Fr. Koliński moved to Chicago where he worked for many years as the Senior Program Officer of the Illinois Humanities Council. Perceiving that God was calling him to a vocation in religious life, Fr. Koliński was one of the founding members of the Canons Regular of St. John Cantius, a new religious community of men that was founded at St. John Cantius Parish in Chicago in 1998. He received an MDiv degree following the completion of his seminary studies at Holy Apostles Seminary in Cromwell, Connecticut and was ordained to the priesthood in 2004.

After serving as an Associate Pastor at St. John Cantius Parish in Chicago, Fr. Koliński was appointed in 2007 as pastor of his community’s second parish, St. Peter’s in Volo, Illinois. Since 2010, he has been assigned to Holy Apostles Seminary and College as formator and academic advisor for the seminarians of the Canons Regular of St John Cantius. He is also a member of the seminary faculty and helps in seminary formation.

(860) 632-3010