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Online Learning

Course Number: HUM 103
Course Title: Humanities in the Ancient World
Term: Fall 2014

Professor

Fr. Peter Samuel Kucer MSA STD

pkucer@holyapostles.edu

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is an introduction to the origin and development of the humanities of the pre-Christian world.  Students will be introduced to the various cultures of the ancient world that prepared for the fullness of time when God the Father in his infinite wisdom sent his only begotten son Jesus into the particular human culture of Judaism.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. That standing on the shoulders of the peoples of the ancient world, students will demonstrate through class discussion an awareness of the perennial questions of humanity and a wonder at the creature called “human.”
  2. That through the perennial questions and corresponding answers given in Gaudium et Spes, students will demonstrate through class discussion an understanding of the radical difference between the pre-Christian (or post-Christian) and Christian world.
  3. In studying the capacity of man to execute his imaginative intellect, students will demonstrate by writing essays an awareness and appreciation of beauty.

3. COURSE SCHEDULE

Please note: The reading assignments were designed for you to read the chapter reading first and then my accompanying lecture notes.   In addition, all quizzes and the final exam are open book tests.

Week 1: The Rise of Culture: From Forest to Farm

Process

  1. Chapter 1
  2. Lecture 1 part A
  3. Post response to discussion Lecture 1 part A questions
  4. Quiz 1 Chapter 1

Week 2: The Rise of Culture: From Forest to Farm

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 1 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 2
  3. Lecture 1 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 1 part B questions
  5. Quiz 1.2 Chapter 1

Week 3: Mesopotamia:  Power and Social Order in the Early Middle East

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 1 part B questions.
  2. Chapter 2
  3. Lecture 2 part A
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 2 part A questions
  5. Quiz 1.3 Chapter 2

Week 4: Mesopotamia:  Power and Social Order in the Early Middle East

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 2 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 2
  3. Lecture 2 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 2 part B questions
  5. Quiz 1.4 Chapter 2

Week 5: The Stability of Ancient Egypt: Flood and Sun

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 2 part B questions.
  2. Chapter 3
  3. Lecture 3 part A
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 3 part A questions
  5. Quiz 1.5 Chapter 3

Week 6: The Stability of Ancient Egypt: Flood and Sun

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 3 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 3
  3. Lecture 3 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 3 part B questions
  5. Quiz 1.6 Chapter 3

Week 7: The Aegean World and the Rise of Greece:  Trade, War, and Victory

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 3 part B questions.
  2. Chapter 4
  3. Lecture 4 part A
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 4 part A questions
  5. Quiz 1.7 Chapter 4

Week 8: The Aegean World and the Rise of Greece:  Trade, War, and Victory

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 4 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 4
  3. Lecture 4 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 4 part B questions
  5. Quiz 1.8 Chapter 4

Week 9: Golden Age Athens and the Hellenic World:  The School of Hellas

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 4 part B questions.
  2. Chapter 5
  3. Lecture 5 part A
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 5 part A questions
  5. Quiz 1.9 Chapter 5

Week 10: Golden Age Athens and the Hellenic World:  The School of Hellas

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 5 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 5
  3. Lecture 5 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 5 part B questions
  5. Quiz 2.0 Chapter 5

Week 11: Rome: Urban Life and Imperial Majesty

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 5 part B questions.
  2. Chapter 6
  3. Lecture 6 part A
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 6 part A questions
  5. Quiz 2.1 Chapter 6

Week 12: Rome: Urban Life and Imperial Majesty

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 6 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 6
  3. Lecture 6 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 6 part B questions
  5. Quiz 2.2 Chapter 6

Week 13: Other Empires:  Urban Life and Imperial Majesty in China and India

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 6 part B questions.
  2. Chapter 7
  3. Lecture 7 part A
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 7 part A questions
  5. Quiz 2.3 Chapter 7

Week 14: Other Empires:  Urban Life and Imperial Majesty in China and India

Process

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 7 part A questions.
  2. Chapter 7
  3. Lecture 7 part B
  4. Post response to discussion Lecture 7 part B questions
  5. Quiz 2.4 Chapter 7

Week 15

Assignments

  1. Respond to the instructor’s feedback to the student’s post to discussion Lecture 7 part B questions.
  2. Take the Final Exam.  The Final Exam will consist of 100 multiple choice questions.  All questions will be taken from the previously taken quizzes.  Students will have two hours to complete the exam.  As with the quizzes, this exam is open book.  In order to complete the exam before time is up, it is important to not rely exclusively on looking up answers.

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • 30%: Chapter Quizzes – 14 Quizzes
  • 30%: Lecture Questions for 14 Lectures
  • 20%: Final Exam
  • 20%: Response to Instructor’s feedback

5. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

  • Sayre, Henry M.  The Humanities: Culture, Continuity & Change Book 1: Prehistory to 200 CE (2nd Edition) (Humanities: Culture, Continuity & Change).  New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc., 2012.  $34.03 to buy $19.07 to rent.  | ISBN-10: 0205013309 | ISBN-13: 978-0205013302 | Edition: 2

6. EVALUATION

(Basis of evaluation with explanation regarding the nature of the assignment and the percentage of the grade assigned to each item below). Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubrics for Essay on Lecture

CONTENT

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Absence of Understanding

Essay shows no awareness of the concepts addressed in the topic by shifting off-topic

Misunderstanding

Essay demonstrates a misunderstanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic through an inability to re-explain them

Adequate Understanding

Essay demonstrates an adequate understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic by a re-explanation of them

Solid understanding

Essay demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts addressed in the topic and uses that understanding effectively in the examples it provides

Insightful understanding

Essay demonstrates an understanding of the basic concepts of the topic through the use of examples and by making connections to other concepts

 

WRITING EXPRESSION

 

1 (F)

2 (D)

3 (C)

4 (B)

5 (A)

Incomplete writing

Writing is only partially written or fails to address the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Writing touches only on the surface of the topic and proceeds to talk about something else; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number  of errors in grammar, mechanics and usage.

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Writing is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment; satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors.

Solid writing with something interesting to say

Writing is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples; level-appropriate syntax and diction; mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any  error.

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Writing is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage.

 

Discussion Post Rubric

Points

5

4

3

0

Quality of Post

Appropriate comments: thoughtful, reflective, and respectful of previous posting.

Appropriate comments and responds respectfully.

Responds, but with minimum effort. (e.g. “I agree.”

No posting

Relevance of Post

Posts topics related to discussion topic; which can prompt further discussion of topic.

Posts topics that are related to discussion content.

Posts topics which do not relate to the discussion content; makes short or irrelevant remarks.

No posting

 

7. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

8. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students, where applicable:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

9. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

10. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete and must receive the grade that they have earned. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

11. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Your instructor, Fr. Peter, is most eager to open your minds to the humanities of pre-Christian times.  I hope my youthful will lift your spirits up and, with the grace of God, we will mutually grow in wisdom and knowledge of the ancient world.

(860) 632-3010