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Course Number: CH 661
Course TitleThe First 21 Ecumenical Councils
Term: Summer 2014

Professor

Daniel G. Van Slyke, S.T.L., Ph.D.

dvanslyke@holyapostles.edu

1. Course Description

This course focuses on the twenty-one ecumenical councils of the Catholic Church. Readings, discussions, and research assignments will focus on the texts and the contributions of the councils themselves. The professor’s study material will provide the broader context of each council, and relate it to significant events and development in ecclesiastical history. The councils will be studied in their historical contexts, and from the perspectives their contributions to theology and ecclesiastical discipline.

2. Envisioned Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the doctrinal contributions of the twenty-one ecumenical councils recognized by the Catholic Church, and how they contribute to the doctrine of the faith.
  2. Students will demonstrate familiarity with the historical context of the councils, and how they reflect and impact the relationship of the Church to broader political and social developments.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to read and interpret disciplinary prescriptions of ecumenical councils in their proper contexts.

3. REQUIRED READINGS:

  • Tanner, Norman P., et al., eds. Decrees of the Ecumenical Councils. 2 vols. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 1990. This two-volume set is expensive because it contains the original Greek and Latin texts of the councils alongside English translations. If you do not think that this would be a good investment for you, then you will be able to find most or all of the texts we will read on the internet, so do not feel compelled to purchase Tanner’s volumes. If you are serious about pursuing theology or classical languages and can afford these volumes, however, they will prove an invaluable resource.
  • Bellitto, Christopher M. The General Councils: A History of the Twenty-One Church Councils from Nicaea to Vatican II. New York: Paulist Press, 2002.

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • Discussion Postings: 39% – 3 points each, times 13
  • Quizzes: 28% – 4 points each, times 7
  • First Essay: 15% (Week 7; for instructions, see the separate document titled “Essay Assignments”)
  • Second Essay: 18% (Week 13)

5. Course Schedule

Week 1: The Council of Jerusalem and Councils in General

Study Notes:

The Council of Jerusalem

Readings:

Acts 15 [any Bible]

Galatians 2 [any Bible]

Bellitto, p. 15

Bellitto, pp. 35-43

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion A: On the discussion board provided for this purpose, introduce yourself. Please indicate how far you are advanced in your theological studies, and why you are taking this course.

Discussion B: In this week's forum, respond to one or more of the following topics: (1) Post a summary of what you see as the most salient points (not necessarily all salient points, but those which you consider most helpful or most central) in the assigned readings and study notes. (2) Reflect upon why the Council of Jerusalem is not listed among the Twenty-One Ecumenical Councils, despite the fact that it seems to meet all the criteria. Responding to this prompt will demand that you draw from other theological topics you have studied. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 2: Nicaea (325) and Constantinople I (381)

Study Notes:

Trinitarian Controversies of the Fourth Century, Part I: The First Ecumenical Council, Nicaea I (325)

Trinitarian Controversies of the Fourth Century, Part II: The Second Ecumenical Council, Constantinople I (381)

Readings:

First Council of Nicaea, profession of faith and canons, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 1-19

First Council of Constantinople, exposition of faith, letter, and canons, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 21-35

Bellitto, pp.17-22

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: On the discussion board for week 2, post a summary of what you see as the most salient points (not necessarily all salient points, but those which you consider most helpful or most central) in the assigned readings and study notes. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 2 quiz.

Week 3: Ephesus (431) and Chalcedon (451)

Study Notes:

The Third Ecumenical Council, Ephesus (431): Christological Controversies of the Fifth Century, Part I

The Fourth Ecumenical Council, Chalcedon (451): Christological Controversies of the Fifth Century, Part II

Readings:

Council of Ephesus, all documents, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 37-65

Council of Chalcedon, all documents, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 75-103

Bellitto, pp. 22-27

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post a summary of what you see as the most salient points (not necessarily all salient points, but those which you consider most helpful or most central) in the assigned readings and study notes. This week, pay attention to the role and development of heresies in your studies and your postings. They are central to understanding the ecumenical councils of the early Christian period. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 4: Constantinople II (553) and Constantinople III (680-681)

Study Notes:

The Fifth Ecumenical Council, Constantinople II (553)

The Sixth Ecumenical Council, Constantinople III (680-681)

Readings:

Second Council of Constantinople, sentence against the “Three Chapters” and anathemas, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 105-122

Third Council of Constantinople, exposition of faith, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 121-130

Bellitto, pp. 27-30

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post a summary of the key issues at the Second and Third Councils of Constantinople, based upon the assigned readings and study notes. Be sure to comment on church-state relations and the impact of imperial politics on these two councils. In particular, why did Emperors Justinian and Constantine the New call these two councils? A complete answer must refer to the previous ecumenical councils and their aftermath. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 4 quiz.

Week 5: Nicaea II (787) and Constantinople IV (869-870)

Study Notes:

The Seventh Ecumenical Council, Nicaea II (787)

The Eighth General Council, Constantinople IV (869-870)

Readings:

Second Council of Nicaea, definition, anathemas, and canons, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 131-156

Fourth Council of Constantinople, definition and canons, in Tanner, vol. 1, 157-186

Bellitto, pp. 31-34

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post a summary of the key issues at the Second Council of Nicaea and the Fourth Council of Constantinople, based upon the assigned readings and study notes. Be sure to comment on East-West relations and the impact of imperial politics on these two councils, as well as the role of representative iconography in the Church. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 6: Lateran I (1123) and Lateran II (1139)

Study Notes:

The Ninth General Council, Lateran I (1123)

The Tenth General Council, Lateran II (1139)

Readings:

First Lateran Council, canons, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 190-194

Second Lateran Council, canons, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 197-203

Bellitto, pp. 49-51

Bellitto, pp. 65-75

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion. Post your observations on how councils changed between the close of the patristic period (with Nicaea II and Constantinople IV) and the thirteenth century. Include some element of comparison and/or contrast between the First and Second Lateran Councils, on the one hand, and any or all of the preceding eight ecumenical councils, on the other. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 6 quiz.

Week 7: Lateran III (1179) and Lateran IV (1215)

Study Notes:

The Eleventh General Council, Lateran III (1179)

The Twelfth General Council, Lateran IV (1215)

Readings:

Canons of the Third Lateran Council, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 211-225

Constitutions of the Fourth Lateran Council, 1-10, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 230-40; Constitutions 14-15, pp. 242-243; Constitutions 24-27, pp. 246-248; Constitution 71, pp. 267-271

Bellitto, pp. 51-56

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Submit First Essay by the end of the week as an attachment to a post in the Week 7 discussion forum.

NO REQUIRED DISCUSSION this week. Reading your fellow students' essays and discussing them is recommended but not required.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 8: Lyons I (1245) and Lyons II (1274)

Study Notes:

The Thirteenth General Council, Lyons I (1245)

The Fourteenth General Council, Lyons II (1274)

Readings:

First Council of Lyons, Bull Deposing the Emperor Frederick II, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 278-283

First Council of Lyons, Constitution I, 18-22, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 290-293; and Constitution II, 1-5, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 293-301

Second Council of Lyons, Constitution I, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 309-314; Constitution II, 1-14 and 26-31, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 314-322 and pp. 328-331

Bellitto, pp. 57-61

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: On this week's discussion board forum, respond to one or more of the following prompts: (1) Post your observations on how councils changed between Lateran I, II, III, and IV on the one hand, and Lyons I and II on the other. Be sure to address the roles of popes and secular rulers and their relationships. (2) How does the shift in location from the Lateran to Lyons illustrate a number of other changes and issues that arise during the thirteenth century? How is this shift demonstrated in the documents of these councils? Be sure to address the roles of popes and secular rulers and their relationships. (3) Does anything new to ecumenical councils appear in Lateran III, Lateran IV, Lyons I, and/or Lyons II? (4) Comment on the development of relations between the Eastern Churches and the West during this period, paying particular attention to the role of the general councils in this development. (5) What internal crises does the Church face and address in these councils? (6) What external crises does the Church face especially in the thirteenth century and address in these councils? Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 8 quiz.

Week 9: Vienne (1311-1312)

Study Notes:

The Fifteenth General Council, Vienne (1311-1312)

Readings:

Council of Vienne, Bulls and ordinances of the Roman curia concerning the order of the Templars, 1 and 2, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 336-346; and Decree 28, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 383-384

Bellitto, pp. 61-64

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: This week, during which we will consider only one relatively brief council, provides an opportunity to take a breath and to review the "broader picture" of the councils considered thus far. In your postings this week, compare and/or contrast the Council of Vienne with any or all of the previous councils, whether of the Middle Ages (from Lateran I to Lyons II) or of the early Christian centuries (Nicaea I to Constantinople IV). Pay particular attention to the significance of one or more of the following topics: the crusades; church-state relations; and the rise (and sometimes decline) of new religious orders and congregations. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 10: Constance (1414-1418) and Basel-Ferrara-Florence-Rome (1431-1445)

Study Notes:

The Sixteenth General Council, Constance (1414-1418)

The Seventeenth General Council, Florence (1431-1445)

Readings:

Council of Constance, Session 15, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 421-432

Council of Florence, Definition of the Holy Ecumenical Synod of Florence, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 523-528

Bull of Union with the Armenians, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 534-559

Bellitto, pp. 79-95

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post a summary of the key issues at the Council of Constance and the Council of Basel-Ferrera-Florence-Rome, based upon the assigned readings and study notes. In your summary, be sure to comment on one or more of the following topics: (1) the rise and fall of papal power and prestige; (2) the rise and fall of conciliar power and prestige; (3) the changing dynamics of international politics, and how they affect the Church; (4) the edifying and/or not-so-edifying figures at and around these councils. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 10 quiz.

Week 11: Luther and Lateran V (1512-1517)

Study Notes:

Martin Luther and the Origins of Protestantism

The Eighteenth General Council, Lateran V (1512-1517)

Readings:

Fifth Lateran Council, Session 9, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 609-617

Fifth Lateran Council, Session 10, On Printing Books and On the Pragmatic Sanction, in Tanner, vol. 1, pp. 632-634

Bellitto, pp. 96-101

Activities:

Read the assigned readings

Review the study notes

Discussion: On this week's discussion board, respond to the following topics: (1) Compare and/or contrast the Fifth Lateran Council with the Councils of Constance and Basel-Ferrera-Florence Rome. What new issues have arisen, and what old issues continue to be problematic? (2) Consider Lateran V in light of Martin Luther’s appearance on the scene. (3) What is the significance of the Pragmatic Sanction of Bourges and the Synod of Pisa, and how do these impact the history of the ecumenical councils? Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 12: Trent (1545-1563)

Study Notes:

The Nineteenth Ecumenical Council, Trent (1545-1563), Part I

The Council of Trent, Part II: Trent on the Sacraments

Readings:

Session 4, decree concerning the canonical scriptures, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 663-665

Session 5, decree concerning original sin, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 665-667

Session 6, decree and canons on justification, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 671-861

Session 7, decree and canons on the sacraments in general, on baptism, and on confirmation, in Tanner, Vol. 2, pp. 684-686

Session 23, canons 14-18, on those to be advanced to the priesthood, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 749-753

Bellitto, pp. 101-111

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: On the discussion board for this week, address one or more of the following topics: (1) Post your observations on the Council of Trent and how it compares or contrasts with any or all of the councils that have preceded it. (2) Comment also on Trent’s response to the early Protestants’ challenges to Catholic faith and practice. (3) What topics does Trent address, in what order, and why? (4) Discuss Trent’s teachings on the sacraments in general, and on the Eucharist in particular. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 12 quiz.

Week 13: Vatican I (1869-1870)

Study Notes:

The Twentieth Ecumenical Council, Vatican I (1869-1870)

Readings:

Vatican I, Dogmatic Constitution on the Catholic Faith Dei Filius, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 804-811

Vatican I, Dogmatic Constitution on the Church Pastor aeternus, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 811-816

Bellitto, pp. 115-125

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Submit Second Essay as an attachment to a comment on the Week 13 discussion forum by the end of the week.

NO REQUIRED DISCUSSION this week. Reading your fellow students' essays and discussing them is recommended but not required.

NO QUIZ this week.

Week 14: Vatican II (1962-1965), part I

Study Notes:

The Twenty-First Ecumenical Council, Vatican II (1962-1965)

The Second Vatican Council, Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum concilium (4 December 1963)

Readings:

Dogmatic Constitution on Revelation Dei Verbum, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 971-981

Constitution on Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum concilium, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 820-843

Bellitto, pp. 126-145

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Address one or more of the following topics in this week’s discussions: (1) According to Dei Verbum, what is the relationship between Scripture and Tradition? (2) What did you find in Sacrosanctum concilium that you did not expect to find, and what did you not find that you expected to find? (3) Now that you have read the document, how will you celebrate 50th anniversary of Sacrosanctum concilium on December 4th? (4) Discuss the relationship between Vatican I’s Dei Filius and Vatican II’s Dei Verbum. Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings.

Take the week 14 quiz.

Week 15: Vatican II (1962-1965), part II

Study Notes:

Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity Apostolicam actuositatem (18 November 1965)

The Dogmatic Constitution on the Church Lumen gentium (21 November 1964)

Readings:

Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity Apostolicam actuositatem, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 981-1001

Dogmatic Constitution on the Church Lumen gentium, in Tanner, vol. 2, pp. 849-898

Bellitto, pp. 126-145

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Now that you have read several documents by the Second Vatican Council, post a summary of the Second Vatican Council in light of the First Vatican Council and any council or councils that preceded it. In what ways does Vatican II continue the project of previous councils, and in what ways is Vatican II unique? In addition to considering this question, comment on one or more of the following: (1) Based upon Apostolicam actuositatem, what is the role of the laity in the Church? How does this correspond with what you thought Vatican II taught about the laity? (2) What sort of ecclesiology does Vatican II set forth in Lumen gentium? How does this correspond with what you thought Vatican II taught about the Church? Respond to the postings of other students, for a minimum total of 3 postings. (3) Discuss the relationship between Vatican I’s Pastor aeternus and Vatican II’s Lumen gentium.

NO QUIZ this week. Concentrate on the final discussion board.

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

  • Carroll, Warren H. The Founding of Christendom. A History of Christianity, vol. 1. Front Royal, VA: Christendom Press, 1985-2005. The titles of the remaining individual volumes follow: The Building of Christendom (vol. 2); The Glory of Christendom (vol. 3); The Cleaving of Christendom (vol. 4); The Revolution against Christendom (vol. 5).
  • Davis, Leo Donald. The First Seven Ecumenical Councils (325-787): Their History and Theology. Collegeville MN: Liturgical Press, 1983.
  • Moczar, Diane. Ten Dates Every Catholic Should Know: The Divine Surprises and Chastisements that Shaped the Church and Changed the World. Manchester, NH: Sophia Institute, 2005.
  • Schreck, Alan. The Compact History of the Catholic Church. Cincinnati, OH: St. Anthony Messenger Press, 1995.

7. EVALUATION

Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

0 pts. – Paper
0 pts. – DB Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
2 pts. – DB Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
4 pts. – DB Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
6 pts. – DB Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
8 pts. – DB Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
10 pts. – DB Posting;

 

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as the relate to the topic

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of  concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connec-tions to other con-cepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

 

 

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format

 

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering;  simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment;  satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

 

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development

 

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Daniel G. Van Slyke, S.T.L., Ph.D. is Associate Dean of Online Learning at Holy Apostles College and Seminary. He has taught and researched at Caldwell College in New Jersey, the Liturgical Institute of the University of St Mary of the Lake in Illinois, Ave Maria College in Michigan, Kenrick-Glennon Seminary in St Louis, Missouri, the University of Dallas in Texas, Catholic Distance University, and the programs of formation for permanent diaconate candidates in St Louis and in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Holding a certificate in online teaching through the Catholic Distance Learning Network, Dr Van Slyke also helps to train other theological teaching faculty in the use of pedagogical technology.

With training in historical theology (Ph.D., Saint Louis University), systematic sacramental theology (S.T.L., Mundelein Seminary), and moral theology (M.A., University of Dallas), Dr Van Slyke has made numerous contributions to scholarship. His articles have appeared in various venues, including Antiphon: A Journal for Liturgical Renewal, Dumbarton Oaks Papers, Ephemerides Liturgicae, The Josephinum Journal of Theology, New Blackfriars, Providence, Usus Antiquior, The New Catholic Encyclopedia (2nd ed. and Supplement), and The New Westminster Dictionary of Church History. In 2010, Ligouri Press published his popular book, Liturgy 101: Sacraments and Sacramentals.

An active member in several professional organizations, Dr Van Slyke has delivered numerous papers at scholarly conferences and workshops, and reviewed dozens of books. For eight years he sat as an elected member on the board of directors of the Society for Catholic Liturgy. For five years he served on the editorial staff of Antiphon: A Journal for Liturgical Renewal, and he currently serves as associate copy editor of the Seminary Journal.

Dr Van Slyke lives in the Dallas-Ft Worth area of Texas with his wife and their seven children.

(860) 632-3010