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Course Number: CH 610
Course Title: The Psalms as Christian Prayer
Term: Summer 2014

Professor

Daniel G. Van Slyke, S.T.L., Ph.D.

dvanslyke@holyapostles.edu

1. COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course focuses on the Psalter specifically as the prayer book of the Church. Students will explore the Psalms from five perspectives. (1) The historical-critical study of the psalms, including their genre and historical context. (2) The use of the Psalms by New Testament authors, who saw Christ as the fulfillment of the prophecies uttered in the Psalter and continued to pray with the Psalms. (3) Christian interpretation of the Psalms throughout history. (4) The use of the Psalms in sacred liturgy. (5) Spiritual studies and exercises on how to join oneself with the psalmist in the longing for and love of God.

2. ENVISIONED LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. Students will demonstrate general knowledge of the historical-critical issues regarding the Psalms.
  2. Students will demonstrate understanding of and the ability to appropriate the Psalms according to the mind of the Catholic Church, in relation to their spiritual meaning and fulfillment in Jesus Christ.
  3. Students will demonstrate a coherent comprehension of the Psalms, which integrates the results of scientific investigation with the manner in which the Holy Spirit guides the Church in scriptural interpretation and prayer.
  4. Students will demonstrate familiarity with the use of the Psalms in the sacred liturgy.

3. REQUIRED READINGS and RESOURCES:

A. Books to Obtain

  • The Navarre Bible: The Psalms and the Song of Solomon. Ed. José María Casciaro et al. Bodmin, Cornwall: Four Courts Press, 2003. This is the recommend version of the Psalms for use in this course. The introductory material is required reading.
  • All other required readings are posted on Populi either as full-text pdf files or as links to texts available on the internet. The readings posted as pdf files are listed below.

B. Readings Posted on Populi

  • Drijvers, Pius. The Psalms: Their Structure and Meaning. New York: Herder and Herder, 1965.
  • Garrone, Gabriel. How to Pray the Psalms. Trans. Benedictine Monks of Mount Savior Monastery, Elmira, New York. Notre Dame, IN: Fides, 1965.

4. COURSE REQUIREMENTS

  • Weekly Discussion Postings: 37.5% – 2.5 points each, times 15
  • Quizzes: 25% – 2.5 points each, times 10 (Weeks 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, and 14)
  • Brief essays (350 word postings): 12% – 4 points each, times 3 (Weeks 2, 4, and 5)
  • Final Essay: 20%
  • Themes in the Psalms: 5.5%

Weekly Discussion Postings

  • Post on the Discussion forum of Populi at least three (3) times each week.
  • First, post at least one answer to one of the discussion prompts posted in the Lessons folder or on this syllabus. Discussion prompts are questions or topics proposed for the purposes of basing our conversations on the week’s materials. Complete answers require a minimum of one well-structured paragraph.
  • Second, post at least one response to the entries of your classmates. Responses to classmates can provide brief follow-up questions, make additional points, or politely offer alternative responses.
  • Each of your posts should include at least one reference to or quotation from one of the assigned readings for the week. You may cite your sources in a manner of your own choosing, so long as you are consistent.
  • You are invited but not required to continue following the class discussion and to make further contributions after your three required postings.
  • Both your answer and your response must be posted by 11:59 p.m. on the last day of the week­. It is highly recommended, however, that answers be posted at least several days before the due date; this provides more opportunity for student interaction. Late postings will not receive any credit.
    • Note that Dr Van Slyke allows 8 days for each week. For this class, then, the “last day of the week” is counted as the same Monday that the next week begins. For example, if week 8 begins on Monday March 4th, then the final day for posting materials and taking the quiz for Week 8 is Monday March 11th (by 11:59 p.m.). Monday March 11th is also considered as the first day of Week 9.

Quizzes

  • On the first day of a week for which a quiz is assigned, an open-book online quiz will appear in the “Lessons” folder at the beginning of the week.
  • Quiz questions are drawn from assigned readings, study notes, and any other materials provided in the week’s Lessons folder.
  • You may open the quiz and print it, find the answers, and return later to submit your answers. Once you press the submit button you will immediately receive your grade.
  • In order to enhance your learning experience, the professor recommends that you (1) read the materials for the week, then (2) attempt to answer the quiz questions without consulting any of those materials. Finally, before submitting your quiz answers, (3) review the weekly materials in order to ensure that you have answered all questions correctly.
  • Each quiz must also be submitted by the end of the week devoted to the topic covered by that quiz (the Monday or 8th day after the week begins, as explained above).
    • Once the quizzes are removed from Populi, they cannot be taken and no credit for them can be received.

Final Essay

  • The final essay of this course is an exercise in understanding a given Psalm both on its own terms, from the perspective of historical criticism, and, even more so, from the perspective of its use in the Church. Choose any Psalm, and discuss it from the following perspectives:
    • The historical-critical study of the Psalm, including its genre and historical context.
    • The citations or references to this Psalm in the New Testament. Since not all Psalms are cited in the New Testament, this factor puts some limits on your choice of a Psalm.
    • The interpretation of the Psalms by any two Fathers or doctors of the Church.
    • The use of the Psalms in the sacred liturgy. Where does it appear in the Mass, in the Divine Office, or in any other significant rites (e.g., baptism, consecration of a Church).
    • The mystical or spiritual meaning of the Psalm.
  • Formatting instructions:
    • Approximately 10 double-spaced pages in length.
    • Arial 12 point font, with one-inch margins all around the pages.
    • Use footnotes (not endnotes), carefully formatted according to the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Guidelines for Papers, Projects, and Theses.
    • Provide a complete bibliography of works cited or consulted on a final page. Carefully format the bibliography according to the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Guidelines for Papers, Projects, and Theses.
  • The final essay must be submitted as an attachment to a discussion board post by 11:59 p.m. (that is, one minute before midnight) on the Wednesday of Week 15. The discussions of the week will be devoted to conversations about these essays.

Themes in the Psalms

  • The content for Week 12 of the course will be designed by the students.
  • Each student will choose a theme that recurs in the psalter.
    • Post your choice of theme on the discussion forum titled “Themes in the Psalms.”
    • No two students may choose the same theme.
  • Prepare course content for your theme. This course content should include:
    • A one-page set of study notes on the theme.
    • Two psalms that particularly illustrate your chosen theme. These two psalms will be assigned reading for the class during Week 12.
    • One or two discussion prompts, that is, topics or questions to facilitate class discussion on your theme.
    • At least one link or reading that illuminates your theme.
  • When you have prepared your course content, submit it as an attachment to a post on the discussion forum “Themes in the Psalms.”
    • You must submit these materials by the last day of Week 10.
  • Be prepared to engage in discussion on your theme during Week 12.

5. Course Schedule

Week 1: Introduction and the Psalms in the New Testament

Study Notes:

“Navigating the Psalms” [doc]

“Navigating the Psalms” [xls]

“The New Testament: Key to Understanding the Psalms”

Readings:

The Navarre Bible: The Psalms and the Song of Solomon, Introduction to the Psalms, pp. 17-37

Garrone, “Prayer in Christ and the Church”

Three choices of Psalms and corresponding New Testament texts from “The New Testament: Key to Understanding the Psalms”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion A: On the discussion board provided for this purpose, introduce yourself. Please indicate how far you are advanced in your theological studies, and why you are taking this course.

Discussion B: On the discussion board, post on the correlation between the New Testament and the Psalms in the instances of the scriptural passages you chose to read. Comment also on how Garrone helps us to understand the relationship between Christ and the Psalms. Raise any questions you may have regarding navigating the Psalms. Read and respond to your fellow students’ postings, for a total minimum of three contributions.

Take the week 1 quiz.

Week 2: Patristic Exegesis and the Psalms

Study Notes:

“Patristic Exegesis and the Psalms”

Readings:

St Athanasius Alexandria, Letter to Marcellinus on the Psalms

Augustine, On Christian Doctrine, book III (only)

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: On the discussion board, post a brief essay of 350 words that summarizes salient points (not necessarily all salient points, but those which you consider most helpful or most central) of comparison, contrast, or complementarity between the reading from Augustine and the reading from Athanasius assigned for this week. In at least two other postings, respond to the summaries of your fellow students.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 3: Christians and the Psalms

Study Notes:

“Notes on Terms Used by Pope John Paul II”

Readings:

John Paul II, Wednesday General Audiences of 28 March 2001 and 4 April 2001

Drijvers, chap. 1: “The Psalms as Christian Prayer”

Garrone, “Some Working Principles”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: In one contribution to the discussion board, draw together what you deem to be the most significant points raised by John Paul II, Drijvers, and Garrone in the assigned readings. In at least two other postings, respond to the summaries of your fellow students.

Take the week 3 quiz.

Week 4: The Fathers and the Psalms

Study Notes:

None

Readings:

Any sermon or commentary on any Psalm by a Father of the Church. Challenge: you find it, online or elsewhere; ask the professor if you need assistance.

The Psalm on which the Father is commenting. In this case and in all subsequent assignments, read the Psalm as it is found in the Navarre Bible, along with any notes and commentaries therein.

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Discussion: On the discussion board, post a brief essay of 350 words discussing the commentary you have chosen to read, including how it helped you to understand and appropriate the Psalm. In at least two other postings, respond to the summaries of your fellow students.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 5: The Psalms and the Liturgy

Study Notes:

“The Liturgy of the Hours or Divine Office: Structure of Each Hour”

“Psalms in the Mass”

Readings:

General Instruction of the Liturgy of the Hours, sections 100-135

General Introduction to the Lectionary (Second Edition), sections 19-22, 89

Mass readings, including psalms, from any Sunday or solemnity of the liturgical year. If you do not have a missal, these are posted on the website of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops at www.usccb.org.

Morning prayer, evening prayer, and the office of readings for the same day of the liturgical year. If you do not have a copy of the Liturgy of the Hours, you can find these prayers at www.ebreviary.com and on other websites.

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post a brief essay of 350 words discussing the scriptural readings for Mass and the Divine Office on the day you chose. Comment on how the Psalm readings relate to the other readings of that day, or to the particular occasion of the liturgical year on which it is read. In at least two other postings, respond to the summaries of your fellow students.

NO QUIZ this week

Week 6: Royal Psalms

Study Notes:

“Royal Psalms”

Readings:

Psalm 72(71) and Pope John Paul II’s commentaries on it, delivered 1 December 2004 and 15 December 2004

Choose any other royal psalm from the list of commentaries, along with the accompanying papal commentary. Read that psalm and at least one papal commentary on it.

Drijvers chap. 10: “The Royal Psalms”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings

Review the lectures

Discussion: Post substantive observations on either of the assigned Psalms (Psalm 72 or the one you chose), indicating how the commentary by Pope John Paul II and Drijvers’ chapter shed light on the meaning of that Psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 6 quiz.

Week 7: Penitential Psalms

Study Notes:

“Penitential Psalms”

Readings:

Psalm 51(50) and John Paul II’s commentary, delivered 30 July 2003

Psalm 130(129) and Benedict XVI’s commentary, delivered 19 October 2005

St. John Fisher, commentary on Psalm 50

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post substantive observations on either of the assigned psalms, indicating how the commentaries by John Paul II, Benedict XVI, and/or St John Fisher shed light on the meaning of that psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 7 quiz.

Week 8: Psalms of Petition

Study Notes:

“Psalms of Petition”

Readings:

Psalm 42(41) and John Paul II’s commentary, delivered 16 January 2002

Psalm 85(84) and John Paul II’s commentary, delivered 25 September 2002

Drijvers chap. 7: “The Psalms of Petition”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post substantive observations on either of the assigned psalms, indicating how the commentary by Pope John Paul II and Drijvers’ chapter shed light on the meaning of that psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 8 quiz.

Week 9: Imprecatory Psalms

Study Notes:

“Imprecatory Psalms”

Readings:

Samuel F. Weber, "Taking up the Psalter"

Psalm 109 and St John Chrysostom’s Commentary on it

Choose another imprecatory psalm, read it and Augustine’s commentary: either St Augustine, Exposition on Psalm 58, Exposition on Psalm 109, or Exposition on Psalm 137

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion: Post substantive observations on either of the assigned psalms (Psalm 109 or the one you chose), indicating how the commentary by St John Chrysostom or St Augustine and Fr Weber’s letter shed light on the meaning of that psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 9 quiz.

Week 10: Psalms of Thanksgiving

Study Notes:

“Psalms of Thanksgiving”

Readings:

Psalm 118(117) and John Paul II’s commentary, delivered 5 December 2001

Choose any other psalm of thanksgiving from the list of Commentaries. Read that psalm and at least one papal commentary on it.

Drijvers chap. 6: “The Psalms of Thanksgiving”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings

Review the study notes.

Discussion. Post substantive observations on either of the assigned psalms (Psalm 118 or the one you chose), indicating how the commentary by Pope John Paul II and Drijvers’ chapter shed light on the meaning of that psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 10 quiz.

Post your content for “Themes in the Psalms.”

Week 11: Pilgrim Psalms

Study Notes:

“Pilgrim Psalms”  

Readings:

Psalm 100(99) and John Paul II’s commentaries, delivered 7 November 2001 and 8 January 2003

Psalm 122(121) and BXVI’s commentary, delivered 4 May 2005

Drijvers chap. 8: “The Pilgrim Psalms”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion. Post substantive observations on either of the assigned Psalms, indicating how the commentaries by John Paul II and/or Benedict XVI and Drijvers’ chapter shed light on the meaning of that Psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 11 quiz.

Week 12: Themes in the Psalms

Study notes:

To be provided by students

Readings:

To be provided by students

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion. To be provided by students.

There is no quiz this week.

Week 13: Processional and Enthronement Psalms

Study notes:

“Processional and Enthronement Psalms”

Readings:

Psalm 149 and John Paul II’s commentary, delivered 23 May 2001

Choose any other processional or enthronement Psalm from the list of papal commentaries. Read that Psalm and at least one papal commentary on it.

Drijvers chap. 9: “The Processional and Enthronement Psalms”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion. Post substantive observations on either of the assigned psalms (Psalm 118 or the one you chose), indicating how the papal commentary and Drijvers’ chapter shed light on the meaning of that Psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 13 quiz.

Week 14: Psalms of Praise

Study notes:

“Psalms of Praise”

Readings:

Psalm 117(116) and John Paul II’s commentaries of 28 November 2001 and 5 February 2003

Choose any other processional or enthronement Psalm from the list of Commentaries. Read that Psalm and at least one papal commentary on it.

Drijvers chap. 9: “The Processional and Enthronement Psalms”

Activities:

Read the assigned readings.

Review the study notes.

Discussion. Post substantive observations on either of the assigned Psalms (Psalm 117 or the one you chose), indicating how the papal commentary and Drijvers’ chapter shed light on the meaning of that Psalm. Read and respond to other student’s postings, for a minimum total of three postings.

Take the week 14 quiz.

Week 15: Final Essay Submission and Discussion

Study Notes:

None

Readings:

Three essays by your fellow students

Activities:

Post your final essay on the discussion board.

Discussion: Comment on at least three of your fellow student’s essays. Your comments may include further questions and observations about the essays, or points of comparison or contrast with the materials that you have read or researched during the semester.

NO QUIZ this week

6. SUGGESTED READINGS and RESOURCES:

A. Recent Commentaries and Aids

  • Britt, Matthew (ed.). A Dictionary of the Psalter: Containing the Vocabulary of the Psalms, Hymns, Canticles, and Miscellaneous Prayers of the Breviary Psalter. Boonville, NY: Preserving Christian Publications, 2007. This is a reprint of a hand text from the early twentieth century. It is mainly intended for those who pray the Divine Office in Latin, since the entries are all in Latin.
  • Dollen, Charles. Prayerbook of the King: The Psalms. New York: Alba House, 1998.
  • Jaki, Stanley L. Praying the Psalms: A Commentary. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2001.
  • Lamb, John Alexander. The Psalms in Christian Worship. London: Faith Press, 1962. This is not a commentary on the psalms so much as an overview of their use in early Christianity, Eastern Christianity, Western Christianity, and several Protestant traditions. 
  • Pope John Paul II. Psalms & Canticles: Meditations and Catechesis on the Psalms and Canticles of Morning Prayer. Chicago: LTP, 2004.
  • Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI. Praying the Psalms with the Holy Fathers. Compiled by Peter Celano. Paraclete Press, 2011. If this collection included all of these two popes commentaries on the Psalms, it would be required for the class; instead, it offers only a selection.
  • Neale, J. M. A Commentary on the Psalms: From Primitive and Mediaeval Writers and from the Various Office-books and Hymns. 2 vols. 2nd ed. New York: Pott and Amery, 1869. This one is a old, difficult to find, and expensive. Nonetheless, it is a veritable treasury of how the Church has used and interpreted the Psalter through the centuries.
  • Schaefer, Konrad. Psalms. Ed. David W. Cotter et al. Berit Olam Studies in Hebrew Narrative and Poetry. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2001. Schaefer provides commentary on each Psalm from a literary perspective.
  • Prevost, Jean-Pierre. A Short Dictionary of the Psalms. Trans. Mary Misrahi. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 1997. The words are alphabetized and presented in English, while each entry discusses the Hebrew word and its meaning.
  • Reardon, Patrick Henry. Christ in the Psalms. Ben Lomond, CA: Conciliar Press, 2000.
  • White, Bill. “The Commentaries of John Paul II and Benedict XVI on the Psalms and Canticles of Lauds (Morning Prayer) and Vespers (Evening Prayer) from the Liturgy of the Hours.” http://members.wolfram.com/billw/psalter/jp2-b16-commentaries.html

B. Commentaries by Fathers and Doctors of the Church

  • Augustine. Expositions of the Psalms. Vol. 1, Psalms 1-32. Trans. Maria Boulding. The Works of Saint Augustine A Translation for the 21st Century III.15. Hyde Park, NY: New City Press, 2000. The monumental scope of St Augustine’s commentaries on the Psalms indicate how central these were to his life, spirituality, and preaching. The new translations of this series are readable (although at times too colloquial) and provide very good commentaries and notes.
  • John Chrysostom. Commentary on the Psalms. Trans. Robert Charles Hill. Brookline, MA: Holy Cross Orthodox Press, 1998.
  • John Fisher. Exposition of the Seven Penitential Psalms. San Francisco: Ignatius, 1998.
  • Robert Bellarmine. Commentary on the Book of Psalms. Trans. John O’Sullivan. Reprint available through Preserving Christian Publications <www.pcpbooks.com> 

7. EVALUATION

Students who have difficulty with research and composition are encouraged to pursue assistance with the Online Writing Lab (available at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl).   

GRADING SCALE:

A 94-100; A- 90-93; B+ 87-89; B 84-86; B- 80-83; C+ 77-79; C 74-76; C- 70-73 60-69; F 59 and below

Grading Rubric for the Major Papers and Discussion Board (DB) Postings

0 pts. – Paper
0 pts. – DB Posting;

3 pts. – Paper
2 pts. – DB Posting;

6 pts. – Paper
4 pts. – DB Posting;

9 pts. – Paper
6 pts. – DB Posting;

12 pts. – Paper
8 pts. – DB Posting;

15 pts. – Paper
10 pts. – DB Posting;

CONTENT

Absence of Understanding

Analysis shows no awareness of the discipline or its methodologies as the relate to the topic

Lack of Understanding

Analysis seems to misunderstand some basic concepts of the discipline or lacks ability to articulate them.

Inadequate understanding

Analysis is sometimes unclear in understanding or articulating concepts of the discipline.

Adequate understanding

Analysis demonstrates an understanding of basic concepts of the discipline but could express them with greater clarity.

Solid Understanding

Analysis demonstrates a clear understanding and articulation of concepts with some sense of their wider implications.

Insightful understanding

Analysis clearly demonstrates an understanding and articulation of  concepts of the discipline as they relate to the topic; highlights connec-tions to other con-cepts; integrates concepts into wider contexts.

 

RESEARCH

Missing Research

Paper shows no evidence of research: citation of sources missing.

Inadequate research and/or documentation

Over-reliance on few sources; spotty documentation of facts in text; pattern of citation errors.

Weak research and/or documentation

Inadequate number or quality of sources; many facts not referenced; several errors in citation format.

Adequate research and documentation but needs improvement

Good choice of sources but could be improved with some additions or better selection; did not always cite sources; too many citation errors.

Solid research and documentation

A number of relevant scholarly sources revealing solid research; sources appropriately referenced in paper; only a few minor citation errors

Excellent critical research and documentation

Critically selected and relevant scholarly sources demonstrating extensive, in-depth research; sources skillfully incorporated into paper at all necessary points; all citations follow standard bibliographic format

WRITING & EXPRESSION

Incomplete writing

Analysis is only partially written or completely misses the topic

Writing difficult to understand, serious improvement needed

Analysis fails to address the topic; confusing organization or development; little elaboration of position; insufficient control of sentence structure and vocabulary; unacceptable number of errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Episodic writing, a mix of strengths and weaknesses.

Analysis noticeably neglects or misinterprets the topic; simplistic or repetitive treatment, only partially-internalized; weak organization and development, some meandering;  simple sentences, below-level diction; distracting errors in grammar, mechanics, and usage

Acceptable writing, but could use some sharpening of skill

Analysis is an uneven response to parts of the topic; somewhat conventional treatment;  satisfactory organization, but more development needed; adequate syntax and diction, but could use more vigor; overall control of grammar, mechanics, and usage, but some errors

Solid writing, with something interesting to say.

Analysis is an adequate response to the topic; some depth and complexity in treatment; persuasive organization and development, with suitable reasons and examples;  level-appropriate syntax and diction;  mastery of grammar, mechanics, and usage, with hardly any error

Command-level writing, making a clear impression

Analysis is a thorough response to the topic; thoughtful and insightful examination of issues; compelling organization and development ; superior syntax and diction; error-free grammar, mechanics, and usage

COMMUNITY INTERACTION (50-word response)

Inadequate response

Response merely provides laudatory encouragement for original post, e.g., “Excellent post! You really have thought of something there.”

Poor response

Response misses the point of the original posting

Weak response

Response summarizes original posting to which it responds

Acceptable response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds

Individually-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the posting to which it responds and fosters its development

Community-conscious contributory response

Response makes a contribution to the learning community and fosters its development

Professor Van Slyke uses the following symbols in grading papers:

? = some problem in grammar, content, argument, or comprehensibility.

+ = good point.

adrift = a thought, sentence, or paragraph that may contain a fine idea, but is improperly placed within the organizational structure of the paper.

EE = economy of expression. The idea should be expressed more concisely, with fewer words.

fluff = fluff. This indicates a passage that may read well but does not contain any pertinent points, or exhibits a tendency to ramble. Beware of “padding” papers in order to meet criteria of length.

I = insight. Can make up for weaknesses elsewhere.

NAS = not a sentence. It could be a run-on or a fragment.

org = re-organize

r-p = re-phrase. The phrasing may be clumsy or uneven, and may affect the content.

trans = unclear transition, or no transition, either from one paragraph to another or from one sentence to another.

wc = word choice. This indicates a poor word choice.

X = simply wrong, mistaken, or confused statement or assumption.

8. DISABILITIES ACCOMMODATIONS POLICY

Holy Apostles College & Seminary is committed to the goal of achieving equal educational opportunities and full participation in higher education for persons with disabilities who qualify for admission to the College. Students enrolled in online courses who have documented disabilities requiring special accommodations should contact Bob Mish, the Director of Online Student Affairs, at rmish@holyapostles.edu or 860-632-3015. In all cases, reasonable accommodations will be made to ensure that all students with disabilities have access to course materials in a mode in which they can receive them. Students who have technological limitations (e.g., slow Internet connection speeds in convents) are asked to notify their instructors the first week of class for alternative means of delivery.

9. ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY

Students at Holy Apostles College & Seminary are expected to practice academic honesty.

Avoiding Plagiarism

In its broadest sense, plagiarism is using someone else's work or ideas, presented or claimed as your own.  At this stage in your academic career, you should be fully conscious of what it means to plagiarize. This is an inherently unethical activity because it entails the uncredited use of someone else's expression of ideas for another's personal advancement; that is, it entails the use of a person merely as a means to another person’s ends.

Students:

  • Should identify the title, author, page number/webpage address, and publication date of works when directly quoting small portions of texts, articles, interviews, or websites.
  • Students should not copy more than two paragraphs from any source as a major component of papers or projects.
  • Should appropriately identify the source of information when paraphrasing (restating) ideas from texts, interviews, articles, or websites.
  • Should follow the Holy Apostles College & Seminary Stylesheet (available on the Online Writing Lab’s website at http://www.holyapostles.edu/owl/resources).  

Consequences of Academic Dishonesty:

Because of the nature of this class, academic dishonesty is taken very seriously.  Students participating in academic dishonesty may be removed from the course and from the program.

10. ATTENDANCE POLICY

Even though you are not required to be logged in at any precise time or day, you are expected to login several times during each week. Because this class is being taught entirely in a technology-mediated forum, it is important to actively participate each week in the course. In a traditional classroom setting for a 3-credit course, students would be required, per the federal standards, to be in class three 50-minute sessions (or 2.5 hours a week) and prepare for class discussions six 50-minute sessions (or 5 hours) a week. Expect to devote at least nine 50-minute sessions (or 7.5 quality hours) a week to this course. A failure on the student’s part to actively participate in the life of the course may result in a reduction of the final grade.

11. INCOMPLETE POLICY

An Incomplete is a temporary grade assigned at the discretion of the faculty member. It is typically allowed in situations in which the student has satisfactorily completed major components of the course and has the ability to finish the remaining work without re-enrolling, but has encountered extenuating circumstances, such as illness, that prevent his or her doing so prior to the last day of class.

To request an incomplete, distance-learning students must first download a copy of the Incomplete Request Form. This document is located within the Shared folder of the Files tab in Populi. Secondly, students must fill in any necessary information directly within the PDF document. Lastly, students must send their form to their professor via email for approval. “Approval” should be understood as the professor responding to the student’s email in favor of granting the “Incomplete” status of the student.

Students receiving an Incomplete must submit the missing course work by the end of the sixth week following the semester in which they were enrolled. An incomplete grade (I) automatically turns into the grade of “F” if the course work is not completed.

Students who have completed little or no work are ineligible for an incomplete. Students who feel they are in danger of failing the course due to an inability to complete course assignments should withdraw from the course.

A “W” (Withdrawal) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the first week of a semester to the end of the third week. A “WF” (Withdrawal/Fail) will appear on the student’s permanent record for any course dropped after the end of the third week of a semester and on or before the Friday before the last week of the semester.

12. ABOUT YOUR PROFESSOR

Daniel G. Van Slyke, S.T.L., Ph.D. is Associate Dean of Online Learning at Holy Apostles College and Seminary. He has taught and researched at Caldwell College in New Jersey, the Liturgical Institute of the University of St Mary of the Lake in Illinois, Ave Maria College in Michigan, Kenrick-Glennon Seminary in St Louis, Missouri, the University of Dallas in Texas, Catholic Distance University, and the programs of formation for permanent diaconate candidates in St Louis and in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Holding a certificate in online teaching through the Catholic Distance Learning Network, Dr Van Slyke also helps to train other theological teaching faculty in the use of pedagogical technology.

With training in historical theology (Ph.D., Saint Louis University), systematic sacramental theology (S.T.L., Mundelein Seminary), and moral theology (M.A., University of Dallas), Dr Van Slyke has made numerous contributions to scholarship. His articles have appeared in various venues, including Antiphon: A Journal for Liturgical Renewal, Dumbarton Oaks Papers, Ephemerides Liturgicae, The Josephinum Journal of Theology, New Blackfriars, Providence, Usus Antiquior, The New Catholic Encyclopedia (2nd ed. and Supplement), and The New Westminster Dictionary of Church History. In 2010, Ligouri Press published his popular book, Liturgy 101: Sacraments and Sacramentals.

An active member in several professional organizations, Dr Van Slyke has delivered numerous papers at scholarly conferences and workshops, and has written dozens of book reviews. For eight years he served as an elected member on the board of directors of the Society for Catholic Liturgy. For five years he worked as an editor of Antiphon: A Journal for Liturgical Renewal, and he currently serves as associate copy editor of the Seminary Journal.

Dr. Van Slyke lives in the Dallas-Ft Worth area of the great state of Texas with his wife and their seven children.

(860) 632-3010