Graduate


Summer 2015 Online Learning Semester

Preparing for Fall 2015:

Graduate students wishing to take the comprehensive exam during the fall semester must sign up for it by registering for the ‘Fall 2015 Comprehensive Exam Resource’ and paying the $150 exam fee during the fall course registration period. In order to take the comprehensive exam, graduate students must be finished with all coursework or in the final semester of coursework. Students are expected to complete the comprehensive exam within two semesters of finishing coursework.

The following courses are scheduled to be offered through the Online Learning program, graduate level, for the Summer 2015 semester.

Syllabi are being added as they are received.  Please do not contact any professor about his or her syllabus until the first day of the term. Prior to that day, all questions should be directed to the Online Learning Office at 860.632.3070.

Note: At the start of the term, the syllabi that are located in the Info tab of your courses in Populi should be considered as the most updated.

Course descriptions for the Summer 2015 semester graduate course offerings are listed below.

Master of Arts in Philosophy

New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHH 605 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. You may take any core course at the same time.

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

PHH 605: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy Smith
This course covers Aquinas on medieval education, the rise of universities, faith and reason, Aristotelian thought, Aquinas on the world and man, man as a moral agent, the meaning of life, the ultimate end of human action, difference between knowledge and faith; God.

Courses Offered by Concentration

Christian Wisdom

PHS 741 Saint Thomas Aquinas on Being and Nothingness Delfino
This course will help students to learn the most important metaphysical doctrines of St. Thomas. It presents an understanding of reality from Being itself (God) to nothingness (complete absence of being). We shall mostly focus on primary texts from Aquinas, but, when appropriate, we shall read selections from other thinkers who have influenced Aquinas, such as Aristotle and St. Augustine.

Ethics

PHE 663 Natural Law Bazela
This course includes topics such as enlightenment jurisprudence and the “Culture of Death,” the foundations of the natural law, how the natural law works, natural law as a basis for good laws, and natural law in Catholic moral teaching.
PHE 775 Political Philosophy DeMarco
This course studies the basic concepts of political philosophy from a Thomistic point of view. Topics include the nature and purpose of political association, the origin of obligation, the nature of power and authority, the relationship of law and liberty, the role of property, etc.
PHE 841 Catholic Social Teachings Toolin-Wilson
This course traces major themes in Catholic social teachings by using the U.S. Bishop’s document, Sharing Catholic Social Teaching: Challenges and Directions and includes topics therein.

History of Philosophy

PHH 651 Aristotle Geraghty
This course will engage the works of Aristotle.
PHH 781 Philosophy of St Thomas Aquinas DeMarco
This course covers Aquinas on medieval education, the rise of universities, faith and reason, Aristotelian thought, Aquinas on the world and man, man as a moral agent, the meaning of life, the ultimate end of human action, difference between knowledge and faith; God.

Systematic Philosophy

PHS 541 Natural Theology Colton
This course examines arguments for the existence of God, His nature and relation to the world and man.
PHS 551 Philosophical Anthropology Chervin and Apodaco
This course studies human nature from the perspective of the perennial tradition of Catholic philosophy, as well as that of Catholic phenomenological and existential insights.
PHS 611: Logic and Epistemology Yates
This course surveys twin foundations upon which all philosophy depends relying on Aristotelian insights as developed by the great Christian philosophers of the Middle Ages, and develops these in the light of contributions from modern and contemporary philosophy.
PHS 621 Philosophy of Nature and Metaphysics Smith
This course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods, along with the metaphysics of Aristotle; presuppositions of metaphysics, the subject matter of metaphysics, the scandal of generality, substance and essence, from finite to Infinite Being, the nature of existence, the names of God.
PHS 657 Phenomenology Finley
This course introduces phenomenology as a way of doing philosophy, and in particular, as a study of human experience. 

The discipline of Aesthetics emerged in the modern period consequent upon the separation of the transcendental qualities True, Good, and Beautiful from each other, and the emergence of a notion of “fine art” dedicated to beauty. We will argue that this differentiation is a good thing, provided we can begin to see these three in their complex interrelationship and relate fine art to the broader human capacity of making.

PHL 725 Philosophy of Nature Smith
This course explores the fundamental aspects of the natural world knowable to philosophy and science, including a discussion of the methodology and limits of the scientific and philosophical methods.

Summative Evaluation

ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing Buttjer and Van Slyke
This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Master of Arts in Theology

New Students, please note that the first course you must take in the program is PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians. You may take any core course at the same time.

Intercultural Study Tours

Spain [click here for details]

CHH 630 Spanish Mysticism in the Context of Spanish History and Culture Olsen and Soto
This course explores Spanish Mysticism in the lives and writings of St. Teresa of Jesus and St. John of the Cross. Students will spend the first part of the course reading and preparing for a four- week study in Avila, Spain, where they will develop an appreciation for the cultural context of Spanish mysticism through excursions to key historic, cultural and religious sites.
SAS 651 Synoptic Gospels Soto
This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.

Co-Requisite Courses Offered

PHS 607: Philosophy for Theologians Mullady
This course teaches basic philosophy, which is at the basis of the theology of the Catholic Church, for graduate students. This material is necessary to understand the terminology used in Catholic theology.
DTH 600 Introduction to Theology Mullady
This course explains why modern European ideas both within and outside the Catholic Church have led to the conclusion that faith is contrary to reason; examines the relationship of theology, the science of faith, to reason, emphasizing why theology is the queen of the sciences identifying its nature and method; and shows the nature of the act of faith itself and how it relates to other kinds of human knowledge.

Courses Offered by Concentration

Apologetics

APO 512 Apologetics Madrid
This course introduces the student to the art of fulfilling this biblical mandate to cogently and convincingly explain and defend Christian truth, and focuses on the “what” and “how” of apologetics to present a compelling defense of the Faith.
APO 620 Evolution and Catholic Thought Sparling
This course explores the theory of evolution and sources of Catholic teaching regarding whether evolution is an ‘acceptable’ concept within the Church.
APO 652 The New Atheism Mahfood/Sparling
This course focuses on the nature of the New Atheism and the attempt it is making to secure political power in its assault against the faith.
PAS 531 Theology of Social Media Olsen
This course explores the history, trends, and issues related to the Catholic Church and its use of media for social communications. Students discuss how media is “social” and how this can be used to “introduce people to the life of the Church and help our contemporaries to discover the face of Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for 44th World Communications Day, 2010).

Bioethics

BIE 625: Catholic Bioethics Babarsky and Toolin-Wilson
This interdisciplinary course prepares students for pastoral service through an intensive review of the teachings of the Catholic Church regarding the sanctity and dignity of human life from the moment of conception until natural death. Topics include the most challenging and difficult moral and medical issues in the field of contemporary bioethics.
BIE 661 Theology and Biotechnology for Ethicists H. & L. Frieboes [Per the Kentucky State Office of Higher Education, residents of Kentucky may not take this course]
This course studies the basic biological principles related to ethical issues such as in vitro fertilization and other reproductive technologies, embryonic and adult stem cells, artificial contraception, and genetic engineering from the standpoint of the Catholic faith.

Church History

CHH 672 St Teresa of Avila Olsen
This course explores the life, writings and spirituality of St. Teresa of Avila. Teresa’s method of prayer and her reform of the Carmelite way of life to foster closeness with God are emphasized. Her writings, The Book of Her Life, The Way of Perfection and The Interior Castle, are studied.
CHH 707 Church History Church History to 1400 Kucer
This course surveys the first fourteen centuries of the Church, studying the major forces, events and persons shaping the growth and development of Christianity in the East and West. 

Dogmatic Theology

DTH 645 Nature and Grace Mullady
This course examines the natural desire to see God; the controversy over the desire to see God; the state of human nature; the nature of the law; the new law of Christ – sanctifying grace; and the nature, necessity and effects of sanctifying grace.
DTH 731: One and Triune God Toolin-Wilson
This course studies God, One and Three. It considers the divine nature and the trinity of persons in God, attending particularly to the theology of St. Augustine, of St. Thomas Aquinas, and of the contemporary Church.
DTH 751: Christology Toolin-Wilson
This course considers the person of Jesus Christ and the theology of the Incarnation, with particular attention to the development of Christological doctrine and to the theology of Thomas Aquinas.
DTH 760 Ecclesiology & Ecumenism Toolin-Wilson
This course investigates the nature and characteristics of the Church, its attributes, its structures, its mission and its relation to the world, and the development of Catholic thought concerning ecumenical and inter-religious dialogue.
DTH 765 Mariology Lockwood
This course examines Marian doctrine in its scriptural, historical, and modern context using the infallible statements, Lumen Gentium and the post-conciliar documents.

Moral Theology

CLA 720  Institutes of Consecrated Life and Apostolic Societies Luna
The course explores the state of the consecrated life: an historical approach and her spiritual commitment; their implications and full knowledge of this state of life proposed by the Church as means of Christian perfection in the charity.
DTH 645 Nature and Grace Mullady
This course examines the natural desire to see God; the controversy over the desire to see God; the state of human nature; the nature of the law; the new law of Christ – sanctifying grace; and the nature, necessity and effects of sanctifying grace.
MTH 611: Fundamental Moral Theology I Mullady
This course presents fundamental moral principles from the perspective of classical and contemporary moralists. Primary questions include the end of man, human acts, moral determinants, freedom, sin, moral responsibility, conscience, conversion, divine love.
MTH 612 Fundamental Moral Theology II Mullady
This course provides a balanced foundation for the personal and pastoral practice of virtue within the context of the moral law. Students examine in detail the practice of each of the virtues in their proper application to the commandments.

Sacred Scripture

SAS 602: Methods of Theology and Scripture Analysis Lockwood
The course examines concepts and criteria used in Biblical Sciences: word, Revelation, transmission, Truth in Scripture, Canonicity, Authenticity, Integrity, Magisterium, Tradition, etc., and acquaints the students with the Books of the Bible per se: languages; traditions.
SAS 641: Apocalyptic Literature Mills
This course focuses on the eschatological dimension of biblical revelation, exemplified in the book of Revelation. Apocalyptic literature is found in both the Old and New Testaments. Biblical and extra-biblical apocalyptic literature are compared.
SAS 651: Synoptic Gospels Soto
This course explores the stylistic and literary characteristics of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Students study the Synoptic Gospels’ theological, spiritual, and historical background.
SAS 671 Letters of St Paul Mills
This course studies the composition, structure, purpose, historical background and theological themes of the Pauline letters with an exegesis of selected passages.

Summative Evaluation

ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing Buttjer and Van Slyke
This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.

Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies

(MAPS courses may be taken as electives within the MA in Theology Degree Program)

Co-Requisite Course

PAS 601: Fundamentals of Pastoral Theology Anaeto
This course reflects on the identity of the church and its praxis, the ultimate point of reference is the praxis of Jesus Christ himself, examining the pastoral shift from Vatican Council I to Vatican II.

Program Core Courses

PAS 985 Pastoral Issues Concerning Human Sexuality Anaeto
This course addresses the meaning of human sexuality, education and integration of emotion, sexual aberrations, relationship skills such as intra- and inter-personal skills, personal freedom skills, sexuality and spirituality, human sexuality and eschatology.

Concentrations

Marriage & Family

PAS 741 D. Von Hildebrand and C.S. Lewis on Love Chervin
In this course the nature of love as explored by Dietrich Von Hildebrand and C.S. Lewis, will be studied from the philosophical, spiritual and psychological perspectives. Topics will include what love is, types of love, loving and unloving masculine/feminine traits, marriage and family, friendship and ethical choices.
PAS 791 Morals and Psychology Mullady
This course concerns the mutual influence of the life of reason and the emotions on moral practice with emphasis on the nature of emotions, repressive and affirmation neuroses, freedom of the will in neurotics, and the influence of moral practice on the prevention of neuroses.

Spiritual Direction

PAS 531 Theology of Social Media Olsen
This course explores the history, trends, and issues related to the Catholic Church and its use of media for social communications. Students discuss how media is “social” and how this can be used to “introduce people to the life of the Church and help our contemporaries to discover the face of Christ” (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for 44th World Communications Day, 2010).

Summative Evaluation

ENG 891: Academic Research, Design, and Writing Buttjer and Van Slyke
This course walks through the process for producing quality academic research papers, beginning with topic selection, research, and writing. The course culminates in the production of an academic research paper.