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Academics

MA in Theology Degree Program

Master of Arts in Theology

Degree Program Goals:

  1. To educate students in the discipline of Catholic theology, attending to the biblical, historical, philosophical, and systematic roots of Catholic life and belief in a manner that is critical, accurate, and informed by current scholarship
  2. To develop in students a coherent and detailed knowledge of their theological concentrations, including classical and current problems and insights in those concentrations, their developing methodologies, and their current scholarly literature, together with the ability to articulate this knowledge in speech and writing
  3. To train students in the skills of theological research, including the use of traditional library resources and new media resources, as well as in the normal methods and style of theology
  4. To foster in students sound habits of study, dialogue, and discerning theological judgment, especially with a view to their roles in the work of evangelization and/or their further academic work in theology

Degree Program Learning Outcomes:

Students earning the M.A. in Theology will

  1. be able to identify and explain the biblical, historical, philosophical, and systematic foundations of Catholic life and belief in a manner that is critical, accurate, and informed by current scholarship
  2. exhibit, in speech and writing, a coherent and detailed knowledge of their theological concentration, its developing methodologies, its current literature, its major theoretical constructs, and its classical and current problems and insights
  3. manifest the skills of theological research, including facility with traditional library resources and new media resources, as well as the ability to recognize and correctly cite materials appropriate to academic theology
  4. exhibit a critical understanding of diverse theological discourses and positions, assessing them critically and charitably in the light of the Catholic faith
  5. demonstrate competence in communicating Catholic doctrine accurately at a popular level, in a practical and commonly accessible way, whether by ordinary speech and writing or via the new media of social communication

MA in Theology Degree Program Requirements for Students who Matriculated into the Program in fall 2014 or earlier

Apologetics concentration

Apologetics 4 courses
Church History  1 course
Philosopical Theology

 1 course

  • PHTH600 Philosophy for Theologians, prerequisite
Dogmatic Theology

2 courses

  • STD707 One & Triune God (Core)
  • STD901 Christology (Core)
Moral Theology

1 course

  • STM620 Fundamental Moral Theology I (Core)
Sacred Scripture

 1 course

  • SS704 Synoptic Gospels (Core)
Electives  2 courses

Bioethics concentration

Bioethics 4 courses
Church History  1 course
Philosopical Theology

 1 course

  • PHTH600 Philosophy for Theologians, prerequisite
Dogmatic Theology

2 courses

  • STD707 One & Triune God (Core)
  • STD901 Christology (Core)
Moral Theology

1 course

  • STM620 Fundamental Moral Theology I (Core)
Sacred Scripture

 1 course

  • SS704 Synoptic Gospels (Core)
Electives  2 courses

Church History concentration

Church History  4 courses
Philosopical Theology

 1 course

  • PHTH600 Philosophy for Theologians, prerequisite
Dogmatic Theology

 2 courses

  • STD707 One & Triune God (Core)
  • STD901 Christology (Core)
Moral Theology

 1 course

  • STM620 Fundamental Moral Theology I (Core)
Sacred Scripture

 1 course

  • SS704 Synoptic Gospels (Core)
Electives  3 courses

Dogmatic Theology concentration

Dogmatic Theology 4 courses
  • STD707 One & Triune God
  • STD901 Christology
Church History 1 course
Moral Theology

1 course

  • STM620 Fundamental Moral Theology I (Core)
Philosophical Theology

1 course

  • PHTH600 Philosophy for Theologians, pre-requisite
Sacred Scripture

 1 course

  • SS704 Synoptic Gospels (Core)
Electives  4 courses

Moral Theology concentration

Moral Theology

 4 courses

  • STM620 Fundamental Moral Theology I (Core)
Church History 1 course
Philosopical Theology

1 course

  • PHTH600 Philosophy for Theologians, prerequisite
Dogmatic Theology

2 courses

  • STD707 One & Triune God (Core)
  • STD901 Christology (Core)
Sacred Scripture

 1 course

  • SS704 Synoptic Gospels (Core)
Electives  3 courses

Sacred Scripture concentration

Sacred Scripture 4 courses
  • SS704 Synoptic Gospels (Core)
Church History 1 course
Moral Theology

1 course

  • STM620 Fundamental Moral Theology I (Core)
Philosophical Theology

1 course

  • PHTH600 Philosophy for Theologians, pre-requisite
Dogmatic Theology

 2 courses

  • STD707 One & Triune God
  • STD901 Christology
Electives  3 courses

MA in Theology Degree Program Requirements for Students who Matriculate into the Program in spring 2015 or later

Core Curriculum

Two propaedeutic courses, DTH 600 Introduction to Theology and PHS 607 Philosophy for Theologians, are required for all students who do not possess a Bachelor of Arts in Theology. Holy Apostles requires M.A. candidates to complete a twelve-credit core curriculum within the program. The core courses are:

The following descriptions provide an overview of each area of graduate study and specify course work normally required for the M.A. in Theology.

Apologetics
Concentration Chair: Fr. Peter Samuel Kucer, MSA

Courses provide students with the biblical basis for the key Catholic teachings and customs that non-Catholics wonder about, object to, and preach against. Topics include an introduction to apologetics, Catholic norms, nature and grace, the moral magisterium of John Paul II, and non-Catholic beliefs.
Concentration Goals

Bioethics
Concentration Chair: Dcn. Thomas J. Davis, Jr.

Courses articulate authentic Catholic teaching with respect to bioethical issues. They provide students with a solid Magisterial foundation in medical ethics and bioethical science. Some of the topics discussed in an interdisciplinary model are technological reproduction, the criteria for brain death, genetic engineering, end-of-life decisions, "living wills," fetal tissue research, cloning and various legal issues pertaining to bioethical procedures.

Concentration Goals

Concentration Outcomes

Church History
Concentration Chair: Dr. Alphonso Pinto

These courses offer a comprehensive study of the Church from its foundation to the Second Vatican Council. They include the teachings of the Church Fathers as well as the history of the Church in America. They provide students with an understanding of the role of Catholics in knowing the times and interpreting them in light of the Gospel.

Concentration Goals

Concentration Outcomes

Dogmatic Theology
Concentration Chair: Dr. Cynthia Toolin-Wilson

Courses are designed to examine the doctrine of the Catholic Church. Topics covered include Trinity, Christology, Ecclesiology, the Sacraments, Mariology and Grace. Required courses are DTH 731 - One and Triune God and DTH 751 - Christology.

Concentration Goals

Concentration Outcomes

 

Description, goals and outcomes forthcoming

Moral Theology
Concentration Chair: Fr. Luis Luna, MSA

Courses place in perspective the philosophical and theological tools with which the complex issues of morality are theoretically and practically evaluated. They help the student to discover the theological and moral virtues within the context of human activity. Canon Law is covered by courses in this area. The required course is MTH 611 - Fundamental Moral Theology I.

Concentration Goals

Sacred Scripture
Concentration Chair: Dr. Daniel Van Slyke (Interim)

Courses are designed to provide the student with a comprehensive understanding and love of Scripture, the soul of theology. Courses will include books of the Old and New Testaments, particularly the Gospels as the heart of the Scriptures. Methods of patristic interpretation as well as modern methods of interpretation will be utilized. The required course is SAS 651 - Synoptic Gospels.

Concentration Goals

 

Summative Evaluation

The Summative Evaluation is the capstone of the student’s academic work in the M.A. program at Holy Apostles College and Seminary. All candidates for the M.A. degree are required to complete a Summative Evaluation exercise, which may take the form of a thesis or a comprehensive exam. Full descriptions of the Summative Evaluation exercise are available on the Summative Evaluation page.

 

  • SAS 651 Synoptic Gospels
  • DTH 731 One and Triune God
  • DTH 751 Christology
  • MTH 611 Fundamental Moral Theology I
  • Four courses must be taken within the area of concentration. A candidate for the M.A. in Theology is required to complete course work from appropriate areas of graduate study. Theology students must choose from one of six areas of concentration for their studies: Apologetics, Bioethics, Church History, Dogmatic Theology, Liturgical Theology, Moral Theology and Sacred Scripture.

    1. To demonstrate that arguments given by atheists are not compelling especially: that science proves that God doesn't exist, that there could not be a God of love since there is so much evil in the world, that reality of sins committed by Catholics in the past and present do not prove that no one should be a Catholic.
    2. That philosophical ethics can articulate with convincing reasons that what Catholics know by faith to be immoral is also immoral by reason.
    3. To demonstrate that Catholic dogma and faithful practice is a fulfillment of the yearnings of non-Christians and non-Catholic Christians.
  • Concentration Outcomes

    1. That students exhibit an ability to speak truth with love and respect in addressing intellectual falsehoods and historical misrepresentations.
    2. That students are able to articulate, in practical and popular ways, philosophical doctrines that are particularly useful or even essential to giving an account of the doctrines of Catholic faith, whether by ordinary speech and writing or via new media of social communication.
    1. To teach students a fully Catholic understanding of bioethical principles and issues as concerns life issues, in their diversity and changes.
    2. To teach students biological, medical, legal (e.g., advance directives) and ethical terminology and how to interpret what members of these different disciplines are saying when using this terminology.
    1. Students will demonstrate an ability to explain, in a popular way, the fully Catholic approach to bioethics, on a variety of life and death issues.
    2. Students will manifest a capacity to understand and interpret developing medical, biological, and legal approaches to life and death issues in a fully Catholic manner.
    1. Students will know a basic outline of the Western Church, and the Church’s involvement in the formation of western civilization.
    2. Students will learn how to use primary sources, examine the relevant secondary sources, and from this background become critical thinkers in evaluating historiography through properly composed assignments, research papers and presentations.
    3. In forming a genuine Catholic leader, the Church history concentration will lead students especially in the historical circumstances of the development of doctrine and how it was expressed in light of the Church’s missionary activity.
    1. Students will understand the foundational “language” of Church history and thus be able to express in spoken word and writing its relevant events and ideas, while being formed for a more profound study.
    2. With evangelization in mind, students will express Church history in a convincing prose based upon scholarly research done in light of Christ, having examined various forms of historiography and their philosophical, theological and methodological foundations.
    3. Students will be able to convey profoundly the historical circumstances of the Church’s Faith while clearly delineating a tradition of ideas, mission, liturgy, art and culture in light of a reflection upon the needs of contemporary culture
    1. To teach students the principles, sources, and methods of the science of theology, and its relationships to, and distinctions from, philosophy and reason.
    2. To educate students in the major dogmatic disciplines using Thomistic and magisterial sources, and fully Catholic theologians.
    1. Students will demonstrate a familiarity with, and the ability to explain in detail, major dogmatic teachings of the Catholic Church.
    2. Students will demonstrate competence in distinguishing between fully Catholic approaches to doctrine and other approaches, and be able to communicate the correctness of the former and the incorrectness of the latter.
    1. To establish the moral experience of the human being, from the personal morality and its its relationship with the ethos.
    2. To cultivate a coherent view of knowledge, freedom, and responsibility in a world where the fundamental rights such as life, family and distributive justice are challenged.
    3. Christian values must be submitted with coherence and as an aid to discover our humanity and respond to the most sublime man’s search: the truth. It is what is called the dialogue between faith and reason.
    4. Jesus Christ yesterday, today and always is the concrete response to the deepest aspirations of the human being, Christian morality seeks to present this reality with a new language to the present culture.

       

  • Concentration Outcomes

    1. To be able to identify and explain the biblical, historical, ethical, and systematic foundations of Catholic Moral Life and belief in a manner that is critical, accurate, and informed by current scholarship.
    2. To be able to exhibit, in speech and writing, a coherent and detailed knowledge of their theological moral concentration, its developing methodologies, its current literature, its major theoretical constructs, and its classical and current problems and insights.
    3. To be able to manifest the skills of theological research, including facility with  traditional library resources and new media resources, as well as the ability to recognize and correctly cite materials appropriate to academic theology.
    4. To be able to exhibit a critical understanding of diverse theological moral discourses and positions, assessing them critically and charitably in the light of the Catholic faith.
    5. To be able to demonstrate competence in communicating Catholic Moral doctrine accurately at a popular level, in a practical and commonly accessible way, whether by ordinary speech and writing or via the new media of social communication.
    1. To enable students to understand biblical vocabulary and themes.

       

    2. To immerse students into biblical history.
    3. To enable students to interpret Sacred Scripture.
  • Concentration Outcomes

    1. Students will employ various critical methods of interpreting Sacred Scripture.
    2. Students will demonstrate the ability to interpret Sacred Scripture in keeping with the Tradition of the Church.

       

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